Letters, References and Notes (1780-1809) 
Relating to James Caldwell

The following is a listing of letters, references and general notes, from 1747-1810, relating to James Caldwell  For notes relating to other years please go to Letters, References and Notes (1780-1874).

 

9 February 1693. Declaration Marshall v Cartwrights and signed by Andrew Skerrett.  A later Mr Skerrett married James Caldwell’s sister.

 

[Richard, Dirk?] Mutsholl Aquittance for the Consideration money upon the sale of his land.

 

Be it known unto all men by these Presents that I Richard Mutsholl late of Burslem in the County of Stafford yeoman (Son of Richard Mutsholl late of Burslem aforesaid deceased) have on and before this day of the Date hereof had and would of from Ralph Cartwright of Brown Edge in the Parish of Norton on the Moors in the County of Stafford yeoman Robert Cartwright of Burslem aforesaid potter and Richard Cartwright of Burslem aforesaid potter (two sons of Thomas Cartwright the Elder of Burslem aforesaid yound) the sum of One Hundred Pounds of lawfull money of England in full payment of One hundred pounds being the possession now mentioned in retain Judenture bearing Date the fifteenth day of April last past before the Date now of and made between us the said Richard Mutsholl of the one part and the said Ralph Cartwright, Robert Cartwright and Richard Cartwright of the other part and for Sum of One hundred pounds of the said Richard Mutsholl do hereby acknowledge to have had a Rord of aforesaid and thereof and of every part and [parcel?] thereof, do acquit and discharge the said Ralph Cartwright, Robert Cartwright and Richard Cartwright and every of them, their and every of their Heirs, Executors and Administrators and every of them for and by these and executors in Witness whose of I the said Richard Mutsholl have hereunto put my hand and seal the Ninth day of February in the fifteenth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord and Lady  William and Mary now King and Queen of England and [Mogy Doud?] 1693

Sealed and delivered in the presence of

Dorothy Butterton [Buttroton?]

Andrew Skerratt [Sherratt?]

His + mark

 

 

14 February 1745.  Letter to Hannah Hacker (1678-1757) from her brother Abraham Crompton.

 

To Mrs Hacker

In Duffield

Near Derby

 

Chorley

14th February 1745

 

Deare Sister,

I received you kind letter by sister and one since with ye account of ye Rebels proceedings at Derby which I thank you for. I was very glad to hear you bore up so well under your hurrys. It’s a great mercy so many of our relations and friends returned in so much safety, after being driven from our habitations. I went into York [shr?] and took ye opportunity to see friends and relations when at Doncaster. I did not think Cousin Coape and Cousin Hacker was so near as Rotheram. I went to Gainsborough, ye road lay through [Missin?} where cousin Catherine was born and I recollected ye name Whitaker, her relations names and called of them. They were very glad to see me, a great many people came out of their houses, they were so afraid of ye rebels. As I wondered at ye Minister they told me couldn’t preach ye day before. Cousin Crompton’s family was well. I went up to Leeds where I found them well and Cousin Molt in a very fine composed frame, not much disturbed. Mr Makant was with me, we went up to York and happened to be recommended to a large inn but we did not know it was a disaffected house. Sabath day I had a desire to hear ye Bishop though he wouldn’t preach because he was in ye City ye night before but he did not come ye next day. We was in ye Minster and in Service was fetcht out by ye Blues and taken before ye Lord Mayor and a Steward to ye Dean. A friend of ours came and informed them of us and we was released.

 

Please to turn over.

 

On ye Fast day I was at Stockport. Mr Hardy, ye Minister there preached. He then had a cold but it was on ye mending hand. Ye rebels had taken him near Leek and run him to Derby and back to Manchester through thick and thin, where he was released. Deborah[?]  was at ye Chappol at Stockport. She lives about a mile of Stockport in ye road to Chester. Ye Rebells were round about them in sight of them, within a quarter of a mile of them. They was wonderfully preserved from them. She lives in a very pleasant place, has a pleasant being there. Her husband is very loving and quiet, not doubt but she carrys well to him for I take her to be very considerate and prudent. She had a very dangerous time with she lay in 4th child was dead. She had Dr White and another. She desired when I wrote to you to give her humble service to you and ye rest of your family. I came home on Friday after ye Fast and found General Oglethorpe’s Lady and servant. The General was here and a Indian King with him. He sent for his Lady hither. She went to Preston, didn’t like there and came again. She was here about a fortnight, a week after I came home and then went into the North. She had a man cook with her. The Rebells, part of them, they were march ye South, came through this town road to ye Cross, pulled out a paper and read a many of our names and then came and searcht our houses for arms and asked where I was. They had heard of me, they wanted four or five thousand pounds of me towards bearing Charge of their Prince’s Army. What I was gone into York [City?] asked in their return from Derby whether I was akin to him of ye name in Derby.

One of the heads of them sat on horseback att our door, made a speech and said they were come to mend ye times and they would or they would all die. The Church should be as it was, and so should ye protestant dissenters be ever ye same. One of them told me they heard ye speech, I askt him exactly, when they returned a party came in after nine at night with torches flaming and affrighted ye inhabitants very much. A many great persons lodged here, they sent a file [of?] soldiers, they had ye Tune Let ye King have his own again, they said what if you should be hanged for playing a tune. They had dancing to ye music. They bid Paul set candles in all ye windows, after a while one said its late, lets got to bed. Paul was glad to hear ye saying. They made our people buy them coffee, tea, brandy, rum &c. The night after ye Shabrage came in. Nine was billotted but near 100 came, it was ye Guard House. Paul said he fetcht them in hay almost as soft as heath, and they lay upon the floor and had great fires. They eat a great deale and drank us almost dry. They loved boyld milk in ye morning. They quit Paul and another one their Oath that we had no more than one horse &c. Three mean men went out of this town with them. Ye Great ones that holds a correspondence with France and encouraged their coming durst not go with them with ye did come but sent little ones. It’s a mercy they did no more mischief amongst us for they have been very rough in some places. Some of our neighbours happily about 1½ or 2 years ago went into ye Highlands under pretence of buying wood and got none but settled a correspondence there and could write to their friends there anytime. I design to speak to Brother, I believe ye money sent was what left of yours. I am afraid a many of ye Rebels will get of their so cunning. Duke William and others are hotly pursuing them. Our Papist holds a correspondence and or other were continually go to France and a little before ye Rebells priests swarm here abouts. They are like bats now, they are crept into their holes.

It is time now to conclude for I shall tire you. These with my kind respect and services to yourself Cousin Coape and Cousin Hanah are from your loving brother

Abraham Crompton.

Please to give my respects and services to relations and friends where you think proper.

 

 

26 August 1747.  Burger Ticket for James Caldwell of Scotland .


James Caldwell His Barges Ticket, Paisley, 1747.
At Paisley the twenty six day of August 
Fajoy and fourty seven years
The which day James Caldwell merchant in Namptwich 
for his good Deeds done and to be done for the Utility of 
the Burge of Paisley was by the Majestrates
and Council there of Made and Created a free Burger 
of the Said Burgh And Admitted to the whole prive
ledges of the Same as a free Burges there of in all
time comeing Who made faith as of is One therentered
Instruments Estracted By
Thomas Simpson Clerk

  

21 January 1759.  James Caldwell of Linley Wood was born, presumably in Nantwich.

 

Note written by James Caldwell of Scotland, father of James Caldwell of Linley Wood.

Special & Particular Mercys of the Lord Towards me 1759 & 1760.

Special & particular Merceys, of God Towards me in 1759 August.  When in Scotland Being threatened with a fever, Exceeding bad all one Night, at Beith, at a Time When a Very Bad Fever Generaly Prevailed all Over the Nightboarhod and many People was Carried off, the Lord in is great Goodness Recovered me the Next day, & Preserved me in Health, & safely Brought me; Home to my Family For Which I Desire to Sincerely Retain a Most Gratefull sense Upon my Heart, & pray God would Enable me to do it as I ought.

Feb 1760.  The Lord Restored me to Health from a very Extraordinary Cold & Violent Pain, Settled in my head For Upwards of Fifteen days and I Trust a most Gratefull sense of it As well as all his great Goodness to me, Will be For Ever Deeply Impressed Upon my Heart Which pray God Enable me to Retain.

April 1760.  The Lord Preserved me from all Misfortunes on my way to & in London & Safely Brought me home to my Family and Preserved also my Wife & Family in health During my Absence; Not withstanding I left her but Very Weak and only a Month of the Child Bed.

For Which Great Mercie I hope a Greatfull Sence of it will be for Ever Impressed on my mind and Pray God to Inable me to Retain.

In April & part of May the Lord Preserved me From some Other Particular Misfortunes, that Threatened me with Regards to my Worthy Affairs; & safely Delivered me from them; God Grant I may be Dearly Thankful for the same.

Viz. Two of my Best Customers  Beeing very ill at Chester & one in Particular R G Likely to Died But Both Recovered & now Well.

In June my dear Wife Being Very Ill Threatened Very much in Tending to A Weakness is Now Blessed be God Recovered and in Good health this June the 18th 1760.

For Which Great Mercie and the many fold Goodnesses of God toward Us.  Lord grant wee may be Duly Thankful, through Christ.

Oct 25, 1760.  The Lord preserved us all in my Family from a Dreadfull Calamity Befalling Us, when Our whole wall of Our House Thratened Falling Upon Us, which In all Humane Likelihood had it Fallen would have Destroyed most of Us for Which great Merciee In preventing it, I desire to Humbel my self Before the Lord, and do hope I Shall Never Forgett the great Merciee and Interpositions of his Providence; in preserving Us all from Death & Ruin and I do most Earnestly Beg our Lord my God

That this great Mercie and all the by past merseas of my Soul, may be so deeply Stampd upon my mind so as to be a great means of Regulating my Conduct in Love so long as I shall Love this would I most Earnestly Begg for Jesus Christ’s sake to whom with thy self & Ever Blessed spirit be glory for Ever Amen.

Vesatations of the almighty To us Poor unworthy Creatures.

Saturday 8 Oct 1760 half an hour after 3 oClock it pleased the Almighty to take from us poor Tomey Sine Child of a partial sore throat.

Decem 29 same year my dear good child Peggy seeased with the same disorder and Poor little Bettey also and on the 30 Dear Jamey

of same two days after Poor Nanney seeased also all four confined the Lord God only Know the unspeak be the sobs of grief that self and Dear wife underwent as wee gave Poor Bettey up for lost to this world.

January 20 1769 our Dear Lad Jammy and our dear child Peggy ceeased with a relapse of the same disorder we in the utmost distress Dr Penlington being out of Town our good child Peggy complained of a Difaculty of Breathing came to a Restoration of sending for Dr Wickstead when he came found Jammy in a smart fever Ordered immediately a Bleeding continued several day in & the fever the ulcers same time came . . .   O Lord Good

Thow & Thee only Knows the the fear & Pangs of grief was thy Poor unworthy creatures felt at that time every hour of their illness.  Thursday the 26 Jamey seiesed by a considerable hoareness & cough and as wee thought a Dificulty of Breathing after going to Bed in the utmost distress of mind concluding he was going in the same manner as our Tommy he having been seeased in the same way two days & before his death at Eleven oClock at night I arose from Bed & went for Dr Wickstead came immediately & sett by him & for some time while asleep he observed to us that he Breathed easier and in some days we Removed our inexpressible fears for that night what wee held for him the greatest Part of the night God only alone Knoweth.

Contented hoarse for near a fourthnights term offered heal & is Pleased God to Recover him & for which and the many great merices thou oGod have Restored upon us Grant we may be truely Thankful and that these Vesetations may have their dead weight and Influence upon us so as to Remind us of our Latter End.  This grant othou Father of mercies Through Jesus Christ & Amen.

 

 

 

 

10 September 1762. A Copy of a letter to Abraham Crompton.

 

To

Mr
Abraham Crompton

In Chorley

 

Sept 10 1762

 

Sir

As ceremony is an idle thing upon most occasions more especially to persons in my state of mind, I shall proceed immediately to acquaint you with the motive and end of addressing this epistle to you, which is equally interesting to us both, you are to know then that my present situation in life is such that I should prefer annihilation to a continuall of it, desperate diseases require desperate remedies, and you are the man I have pitched upon either to make me or unmake me yourself, for I never had the honour to live among the greater, the tenor of my proposals will not be very courtly, but let that be an argument to inforce the belief of what I am now going to write, it has imployed my invention for some time, to find out a redress for my present agonies without hazarding too much my own safety; now for the application of it. I am desperate, and must be provided for; you have it in your power, it is my business to make it your inclination to serve me, which you must determine to comply with, by procuring for me in a months time the sum of fifty pounds which in six years with reasonable interest, shall faithfully be paid back to you, or him you make your heir, so I have given that [hole in letter] and as I wish you well and all mankind I would have you think seriously upon it. Secrecy and compliance may preserve you from all danger: but think I know the world too well to trust my secret in any breast but my own, a few weeks determine me you friend or enemy. Within the limited time; observe on the left hand the steps as you come down to the front gate post exactly over against the ninth bar from the gate post a little sod cut in the flat close to the wall; under which you’le find a little oyl’d leather bag; where you may put the money safely and securely till such time I call for it, or in case of refusal stones and fire are my executioners.

P.S. Order this affair in the night for fear anybody should see you. I am no murderer.

 

For Mr Abraham Crompton, Chorley

 

 

 

 

10 September 1762. A Copy of a letter presumably  to Abraham Crompton presumably dated after 10 September 1762.

 

To Peter Brook and Thomas Gillibrand Esqs, and Abraham Crompton Gent.

 

Gentlemen,

It is now about six months ago since I writt a letter on the same subject as the following, which tho’ it proved abortive and all things now seem quiet on that account yet do assure yourselves if my request is still to be rejected I shall most certainly use such means as may at last convince you that I am in earnest. And though twas never my design to have recourse to time yet I shall not fail to harass you with almost incessant mischief: for what is it any won would not do when a prospect of a great importance stands in his view yet for want of money can’t come at it? How ardently could I wish I had any other means to compass my desire but alas [have?] no other hope then what this unwarrantable method may afford, consider it your own condition; and then try if in your imaginations you can conceive some light ideas of mine: And from such thought only resolve through point of generous goodwill to assist a distressed object when he makes such a proposal as you can’t think he means to wrong you, which was never my intention towards any won: though I’ve cause to conjecture had discovered me in my late adventure I might in all probability have had some occasion to have been providing for my latter and, which if I had no more to answer for than on account thereof, would have been very welcome tome. Death could but have been the utmost exertion of blind zeal putting a period to the [existence?] of a life scarcely for [illegible] of death. Was the unthinking burden [hole in letter] for a time, what if not redress I must experience the remainder of my miserable days, [hole in letter] the most obdurate unrelenting breast could not but chuse to have compassion on such an object, especially since my request is so far bounded as to desire nothing more than what might be consistent with an unprejudicial gratitude. Worldly wealth I’m not ambitious of any further then what may be a handsome supper with industrous management. And though the sum of eighty pounds a piece is what I must require yet was it twice that sum it now lays in my power to make so considerable an advantage thereof as even to dubble it in a very short time. Don’t imagine I am only building castles in the air or fear I shall anyways banggle away the money, for let me tell you my scheme’s infallible and [hole in letter – disposition?] the reverse to that of an extravagant: Both which things you’ll better believe when you come to be acquainted with the designs and conduct of the author only I mention these particulars in order that you may have nothing to object. But if you knew how much it lays in my power inform [one?] of some things I [hole in letter] need to use so many arguments to induce you to compliance in this affair but it is altogether improper and dangerous to my project even to give the least hint till such time as by oath you’ve assured me of a profound secrecy when I shall not fail to unravel the whole unto you. So now if possibly you can think these lines of any consequence you also not fail each of you to make me a [writing?] in some such like a manner as what I’ve here proposed unto you. Finally wishing your designs as good towards me, as mine to all the world at present.

 

 

10 September 1762. A Copy of a letter presumably relating to Abraham Crompton presumably dated after 10 September 1762.

 

I N.N. of N Hall does herby promise to the author of that writeing which was dropt at Mr. Abraham Cromptons of Chorley on the night of the ninth of Marsh last past that if the said author of the said writeing will come and submit himself to me the said N.N. I will both forgive him his offence on account of the said writeing and will also lend unto him the sum of eighty pound current money of Great Britain and also further promise that I will never discover the least secret with which the said author may acquaint me except it be with his own consent but then the said money must be paid back with full interest at the expiration of the term of five years to be accounted from the time that he receives it which shall be as soon as required but if he refuses or neglects to perform what I’ve here prescribed on his part I will when the said term is expired be so far absolved from ties of secrecy as may be only required for the recovery of the money whilst on the other hand if it is returned at the appointed time this affair shall most invilalably be kept a secret and these my other ingagements most faithfully be performed unto which I here subscribe the sacred name of the

Al—gh-y G-d for and as a witness

 

Most ardently wishing by this my hand writeing that d-vi-e Ju-s may inflict upon me the most horrid C-rs-s that possibly can befall me in this world or in the World to come if I the said N.N. does not perform these my promises to which also as witness the underwritten gentlemen has subscribed their names.

Thomas Gillibrand

Abraham Crompton

 

To preserve these from the wet fowld them up in the same manner you found this writeing and in the dusk of an evening order them laid (by won whom it will be proper to sware to Secrecy) in won of those heaps of earth on the side of the causeway that leads over the middle of Chorley Moor in a strite line betwixt James Rigby’s commonly called Stuart and the nursery of trees belonging to Mr Gillibrand, but to prevent any mistake let won go immediately to the place where if he examines the left hand heaps on the side towards the said Rigby’s he will find a small hole thrust there in which is the exact place I’d have you conceal the writeings wherein you must specify that ower of the night at which I may meet each of you in that new building under the door of which I put first letter.

 

 

11 April 1763.  Printed Advertisement relating to Abraham Crompton

 

Chorley, April 11th 1763

Advertisement

Whereas a letter was put under the door of Mr. Abraham Crompton, of Chorley in September last, in which the said Mr. Crompton was ordered to lay fifty pounds in a hole made for that purpose, within the pales in the front of his house; and if this demand was not immediately complied with; fire and stones were to be his executioners. And also another letter of the same kind, and wrote by the same person, was found on the tenth of last month in the court of the said Mr. Crompton, directed to Peter Brooke, and Thomas Gillibrand, esquires, and Abraham Crompton, gentleman, demanding two hundred and forty pounds, or in case of refusal, they might expect to be harassed with incessant mischief. And in consequence of these threats, in the night between the fourth and fifth of this instant several windows at that [fold in paper] and Mr Crompton, were broke by the person it is presumed who wrote the said letters.

 

This is therefore to give Notice,

 

That these incendiary letters are in the hands of Mr John Hollinshead, of Chorley, to be seen and examined by any person in order to prove the hand, and if possible to find out the author. And we whose names are hereunto subscribed do promise a reward of twenty guineas, to any person that shall discover and give information who wrote the said letters or broke the said windows, to be paid immediately after the conviction of the offender.

Peter Brooke

Thomas Gillibrand

Abraham Crompton.

 

 

 

 

1770 James Caldwell approx 10 years old

 

 

 

24 July 1773.  Note from William Bate to Mrs M Arnott

24th July 1773

William Bate to Mrs M. Arnott.

Bond for Payment of £1000 at [?] interest.

Performance of Covenant in a mortgage for [brames?]

Note. Security for £800 to be drawn from Midds 76 and £200 the next thereof to be [used?] from 8th April to Mids [Midsummer?] that term being those paid by Mr Whitehead.

Know all men by these Presents, that I, William Bate, late of Lawton in the County of Chester but now of the Parish of Audley in the County of Stafford Yeoman, am held and firmly bound to Mary Arnott of Congleton in the said County of Chester, a spinster in the sum of two thousand pounds, of good and lawful Money of Great Britain, to be paid to the said Mary Arnott or her certain Attorney, Executors, Administrators and Assigns for which payment to be well and faithfully made, I bind myself, my Heirs, Executors, and Administrators, firmly by these Presents. Sealed with my Seal dated the twenty fourth day of July in the 1st year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the third, King of Great Britain &c, and in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and seventy three.
The Condition of this Obligation is such, that if the above-bounden William Bate, his Heirs, Executors, Administrators or Assigns, shall and do well and truly pay or cause to be paid unto the above-named Mary Arnott, her Executors, Administrators or Assigns, the full sum of One thousand Pounds of good lawful Money of Great Britain with Interest for the same after the Rate of four Pounds for an hundred Pounds for a year on the twenty fourth day of January and twenty fourth day of July being the same Sum of one thousand pounds which is mentioned in the Provisoe of the Indenture herein after set forth. And also if the said William Bat, his  Heirs, Executors, Administrators, and Assigns, do and shall from time to time, and at all times hereafter well and truly observe, perform and keep, all and singular the Covenants, Grants, Articles, Clauses, Provisoes Conditions, and Agreements whatsoever, which, on the part and behalf of the said William Bates his Heirs, Executors, Administrators or Assigns, are or ought to be Observed, Performed, Fulfilled, and Kept Comprised or Mentioned, in a certain Indenture being even date with these Presents, and made or expressed to be made between John Gallimore of Morton in the County of Chester, Butcher and Esther his Wife of the first part the said William Bates of the second part, the said Mary Arnott of the third part and William Harrison of Morely Mess in Congleton aforesaid Gentleman of the fourth part. In all things according to the true intent and meaning of the same. Then this present Obligation to be void, and of none Effect, or else remain in full Force and Virtue.

Sealed and delivered in the presence of

Thomas Harwar

Jos Hanwar

Wm Bates [red wax seal]

 

 

 

 

7 June 1775.  Receipt from a Margaret Caldwell.  It concerns the will of Thomas Caldwell who presumably died a short while before June 1775.  Was Thomas Caldwell, perhaps an Uncle?  It mentions James Caldwell as executor but this could be her father James Caldwell of Scotland or James Caldwell of Manchester.  The receipt reads as follows :

Received June 7 1775 of Mr James Caldwell Executor of the late Mr Thomas Caldwell the sum of One Hundred and Thirty Nine Pounds & Three Shillings and Three Pence, being my share of the residue of the effects of the said Mr Thomas Caldwell with the Accumulating Interest of the same being left me by the said Mr Caldwell, by will.  I say Received by me

                                    Margaret Caldwell

£139.3.3

 

30-22558 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
1775
Bill from Mr Sparrow to Josiah Wedgwood for £3,631:13:6½ 
No mention of James Caldwell.

 

1776.  A collection of 10 printed items which appear to be French opera tickets dated 1776.

Journal des Spectacles

Du Samedi 3Aout 1776

L’Opera

Point de Spectacle

Dimanche laseconde representation

Des Romans

Ballet heroique en trios Entrees

Compote des Acts de la Bergerie

De la Chevaliere et de la feerie

Qu’il continuera Mardi prochain.

[Handwritten notes on the back]

En D’Eslandes 12 Cartons.

En Deslandes

12 Cartons.

 

20th of February 1777.  At the age of 18, James Caldwell started a new job, working as a clerk for the lawyer John Sparrow, in Newcastle under Lyme.  James later mentions in his diary (17/12/1821) that he first became acquainted with Mr Sparrow as Clerk in February 1777. Articles of Agreement John Sparrow to take James Caldwell and train him to become an attorney at law as as follows:

 

Mr Caldwell

Mr Sparrow

Articles

20th February 1777

[45 - 1822]

ARTICLES of Agreement made concluded and fully agreed upon the twentieth day of February in the seventeenth year of the reign of our sovereign Lord George the third by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and Ireland King Defender of the faith and so forth and in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy seven Between John Sparrow of Newcastle under Lyme in the County of Stafford Gentleman one of the Attornies of his Majesty’s Court of Common Pleas at Westminster and one of the Sollicitors of his Majesty’s High Court of Chancery of the one part and James Caldwell the elder of Nantwich in the County of Chester Linen Draper and James Caldwell the younger son of the said James Caldwell the elder of the other part.

And first the said John Sparrow in consideration of the Sum of three hundred and fifteen pounds of lawful money of Great Britain to him in hand well and truly paid by the said James Caldwell the elder at or before the Sealing and Delivery of these Presents the Receipt whereof the said John Sparrow doth hereby acknowledge and thereof and of every part thereof doth acquit release and discharge the said James Caldwell the elder his heirs executors and administrators and every of them for ever by these presents, He the said John Sparrow doth for himself his heirs, executors and administrators covenant promise and agree to and with the said James Caldwell the elder his executors administrators and assigns by these presents That he the said John Sparrow shall and will take into his Service and retain the said James Caldwell the younger as his Clerk for the full term of five years to be computed from the Day of the Date of these presents, And shall and will teach and instruct the said James Caldwell the younger in the profession of an Attorney and Sollicitor in the best manner that he can And shall and will at the end of the said Term use his Endeavours to get the said James Caldwell the younger admitted an Attorney of some or one of the Court of Chancery And also shall and will find and provide for the said James Caldwell the younger during the said Term good and sufficient meat drink and lodging of the said Term of five years that the Executors or Administrators of the said John Sparrow shall and will at their own costs and charges cause the said James Caldwell the younger to be assigned to some other practicing Attorney of one of the said Courts at Westminster and a Sollicitor of the said Court of Chancery for and during the then residue of the said Term And the said James Caldwell the elder for himself his heirs executors and administrators doth covenant promise and agree to and with the said John Sparrow his executors administrators and assigns by these presents That  the said James Caldwell the younger shall and will during the said Term of five years well and faithfully serve the said John Sparrow as his Clerk And that he the said James Caldwell the elder shall and will be answerable and accountable to the said John Sparrow for all and every sum and sums of money books deeds and writings that the said James Caldwell the younger shall receive or be intrusted with on account of the said John Sparrow during the said Term and shall and will find and provide for the said James Caldwell the younger during the said Term sufficient wearing apparel and all other necessaries [meat drink and lodging only excepted] In witness whereof the said Parties to these Presents have hereunto set their hands and Seals the day and year first within written.

Sealed and delivered in the presence of

J Sparrow

Thomas Myddelton

[red wax seals John Sparrow, James Caldwell, James Caldwell Junior.]

Received the day and year first within written of and from the within named James Caldwell the elder the sum of three hundred and fifteen pounds in full for the consideration Money within mentioned to be by him paid to me. £315

Signed in the presence of

Joseph Gibson

Thomas Myddleton

John Sparrow.

No.5 21st March 1777

12 dy pd Fifteen Pounds £15

£15.15

Paid H.Alleyns

 

 

 

 

14 June 1779.  Letter to James Caldwell from his sister Elizabeth who was approx 13 years old.

June 14th 1779

Dear Brother,

This [‘shall’ crossed out] will be [‘my’ crossed out] the last time I shall take up my pen to write to you unless you will CONDESCEND to answer my letters. We have been expecting you at Nantwich for this fortnight past and cannot help thinking that you have utmost forgot we are alive Sir, I have staid at home on purpose to write to you and I think that you are very much obliged to mee but I don’t know what you may think, and so soon more for at present,

From your Sister

Bessy.

 

 

1780  James Caldwell approx 20 years old

 

22 May 1780.  Letter to James Caldwell from his sister Anne.

Mr Caldwell

At John Sparrow’s Esq.,

Newcastle

Staffordshire

Clapham, Monday May 22nd 1780

Dear Brother

If your letter had not just come when it did I believe I should have sent an express by last nights mail to enquire about the parcel, which I had almost concluded was either lost, or fallen into wrong hands. I am more than paid for the trouble I had about them, by their meeting with your approbation, and need I add, that any other little service which it may ever be in my power to render you will never want a heart, though it may want a judgment to be executed to your wish.

I have been with Mrs Acton about ten days, and they have been the most agreeable ten days, I have spent since I came to London . Mrs Acton is indeed a most pleasing woman, and she not only attended me to every place of entertainment, but seems to enjoy them with me too, and takes off a great deal of that painful obligation which I must more immediately appear to lie under to her, if her inclination seemed to go astray from her actions. We live quite in a style, I can assure you for when we have surfeited ourselves with the pleasures of the town, we retire to our Country house at Clapham, which is one of the most delightful spots you can conceive; and where you may reverie the noisy scene, and enjoy all the beauties of the spring in the highest perfection. At this said delightful spot we have been since last Thursday, and have employed ourselves very agreeably and much more usefully than you can possibly do in London . But, as variety has always abundance of charms for the woman, we propose leaving our blissful abode early to morrow morning, and re-enter upon a set of pleasures that are to continue for the remainder of my time. On Wednesday if nothing material happens to prevent us, we go to Ranalagh. Thursday to Greenwich and Woolwich, if we can get admission, to see the Convicts but as the Law against the keepers are now much more strict than they used to be owing to the inconvenience that arose from their exposing the wretches to public view, we are in some doubt about executing this last design. Friday I mean to spend with Miss Hawthornes[?]. They have behaved extremely civil to me, and I have unfortunately always been engaged when they sent for me to their house. Saturday, I don’t yet know how we shall dispose of ourselves, but as I have a good many calls to make at the other end of town, such as Mr Newton, Mrs Banks, Miss Hilditch &c, I think I may as well set Saturday apart for dividing myself amongst them. The first fine day in the next week we go to Vauxhall, and Vauxhall is to put a finishing stroke to all the pleasures I must ever hope to enjoy in London . My time for returning home is expired, and more than expired, so towards the latter end of next week, or the beginning of the week following I must endeavor to think seriously and composedly of quitting all these gay and charming scenes, for my former old fashioned, but comfortable ease and quiet. A letter from home, which I am in daily expectation of, will determine my fate, and if I can divine aright, I shall be within fifteen miles of Newcastle about the middle of the first week of June. I believe I have not been at the play since I wrote last to you. The weather is now so warm, and the houses so full, that t’is as much as one life is worth to attempt getting into any other place but the Boxes, and those you know are not everyday seats. I have not been much [wax seal covering word] with anything I have seen since I came to London , than I was [wax seal again]. Exhibitions of paintings at Somerset House, last Wednesday evening. The House itself is the most elegant piece of building I ever saw, and all the rooms are adorned with paintings of excellent workmanship with most excellent taste. After we had satisfied our curiosity there, we went, as the evening was extremely fine, into the park and walked by moonlight till ten o’clock, not without a Beau though. Mr Corbet attended us all the evening, and has offered to be at our service whenever we will accept him. We did not go to any public places last week because it is esteemed a great piece of vulgarity to keep holyday in Whitsun-week, and having had so long a visit, makes me more keen for getting back to Town. You have heard, I suppose, of the death of Sir Charles Hardy? Remember me to everybody at Newcastle . When I read that part of your letter that mentioned your spending Sunday at Nantwich with Miss W, I could not help wishing myself with you. I don’t know that Miss W expects to hear again from me, but if I can possibly find time I shall write this week. Sam Penlington desired when I wrote to you, I would not forget to give his best complements. He is strangely altered since you saw him, one should not be uncharitable in ones judgment; but he looks to me as if he likes either good eating or drinking. He is monstrously puffed up in his face, and looks vastly plainer than he used to do. I will take care to enquire about the books.

Ever your sincerely affectionate AC.

 

 

22 April 1782.  Note confirming James Caldwell qualified as an Attorney.

Kings Bench

It Happening unto this Court that James Caldwell of Newcastle under Lyme in the County of Stafford Gentleman is duly qualified to act as an Attorney of his Majesty’s Court of Kings Bench and he having this day taken in an open Court the Oaths appointed to be taken instead of the Oathes of Allegiance and Supremacy and also taken and subscribed the Oath as appointed to be taken by Attorney by an Act of Parliament made in the Second year of his late Majesty’s Reign entitled ‘An Act for the Better regulation of Attorneys and Solicitors’ this Court doth hereby appoint him the said James Caldwell as an Attorney of His Majesty’s said Court of Kings bench and direct his admission to be enrolled by the proper officer as an Attorney of the said Court pursuant to the directions of the said Act dated this Twenty second day of April in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred and eighty two

By the Court

Sworn in open Court of our lord the King before the King himself at Westminster the Twenty Second day of April in the Twenty Second year of the Reign of King George the Third.

Inrolled the same Day

Edward Benton

26 April 1782.  Note confirming James Caldwell empowered to take affidavits.

George the Third, by the Grace of GOD King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and so forth, to our well beloved James Caldwell of Newcastle under Lyme in our County of Stafford Gentleman, Greeting Know ye that we very much confiding in your Fidelity, Industry and provident Circumspection, Have assigned, and by these Presents do assign you the aforesaid James Caldwell our Commissioner to take Affidavits within our several Counties of Stafford, Derby, Chester, Warwick and Salop our Cities of Litchfield, Coventry and Chester and Counties of the said Cities and do by these Presents give and grant unto you full Power and Authority to take and receive within our said Counties all and singular such Oath and Oaths in Writing as any Person or Persons are willing and desirous to take before you in or concerning any Cause Matter, or Thing depending or any way concerning any Process in our Court of Common Pleas according to the Form and Effect of a certain Act of Parliament of King Charles the Second, late King of England, held by Prorogation at Westminster, the Fifteenth Day of February, in the Twenty-ninth Year of his Reign, INTITULED, “And Act for taking of Affidavits in the Country, to be made Use of in the Courts of King’s-Bench, Common-Pleas and Exchequer, made and provided;” To have, enjoy and exercise the said Office of our Commissioner as aforesaid, and the Power and Authority aforesaid, as long as it shall please us. Witness Alexander Lord Loughborough the Twenty sixth day of April in the Twenty Second year of our Reign [1782?].

By Warrant of the Chief Justice

Randall.

 

 

28 Oct 1782.  Letter to James Caldwell from J Willett.  Presumably J Willett is a son or relative of Rev William Willet (1697-1778) who married Catherine (Katherine) Wedgwood, sister of Josiah Wedgwood. Peter Holland married Mary Willets (1768-1803) daughter of the Rev William Willet.

Mr Caldwell

Newcastle

Staffordshire

Dear Sir,

You were very good in affording me so much pleasure. Your favors are long in coming. I did not receive yours till [Toryday?] though dated the 20. This is a most delightful day. We have just been sailing on the water. I should have enjoyed it much had the Willets been pleased with it, but she was does not seem to enjoy any thing. Cousin Shushan{?] was very sick but she has just had a dip in the water which has cured her, this poor lass of mine continually dwells on my mind, and is a dead weight on my spirits. She says she like this situation vastly, but I don’t find she gets any better, we are trying today to persuade here to go spend a day at Chester while the [crep?] tide is: and have advice there but I do not think we shall prevail: when I look back on a few years and think what I have suffered, I am amazed I have not sunk under it, next to a kind providence my good friends have contributed much to my relief, you have kindly took a large share in them for which I will always thank you. I dread another bitter cup and nobody can blame me for being very anxious, and solicitous to do all in my power, but it is all in vain, she will not go nor have any advice, which distresses me greatly. I have just had a letter from Peter Holland and another from Jenny Byerley. I hope you will visit that family before we return or we shall hear of it, why will you sit by your self so much whatever affairs you have on your mind, you can settle as well or better on a walk, or if you will give me leave to guess what it is, you will never settle it any where. I hope you will enjoy this fine day, nothing has the appearance of Sunday here. You have took up rather too mean an opinion of this place, here is a deal of good building, a large Assembly Room, a Billiard Table, a large Custom House, a Madame Crosby that kept her Carriadge, there is very little company left except two Miss Staffords, some where out of Staffordshire, that are at Captain Williams, the boys are sailing again this afternoon, we have just seen nine sail come in together out of the Colliery going for Ireland, and a sloop set sail today with a Phaeton on board, and we saw them draw up the horses on board, which seemed to be very barbarous work, it seems a long time since we left home, I think the hours are longer here than with you, pray is Mr J Sparrow moved yet? Is your room finished. Here is a great many enquiring after Mr Lomas and he could tell you what smart milliners there is here, the Post comes in here only three times a week, and we are always glad to see him, you don’t say Mrs Baddily is come home, you might have picked up something to have entertained us in this barren place.

Monday morning what night have we had, poor Shushan went to bed very early sick with her sailing before it was light we were alarmed by very shocking noises and firing of guns, we got up and saw by the light of their lanterns a great number of sailors and soldiers, it was a Press Gang from Liverpool, it very much alarmed the inhabitants, the women assisted many of the sailors, they got into a boat and rowed of for whales. After this hurry was over the Duke of Portland and his suite landed here which was a very fine sight, the yacht that brought him stands opposite our window. We have had two very fine days, but the sea is as rough to day.

Tuesday. You would enjoy this fine watery scenery this morning; Shushan and I have been our morning walk and almost blown away, one part of the water is green as grass like a fine lawn then appears the sands which are a fine strip of brown, and then a stripe of white and beyond the fine hills which look delightful with the sun shining on them, but my pen is so bad, I can write no more. I wish you were here to mend it. All here beg their respectful compliments, accept every good wish from your very sincere and affectionate.

J Willett

Park Gate

October 28,29  1782.

 

Presumed to be a draft of a love letter from James Caldwell to Elizabeth Stamford his future wife.  Probably dates to 1783.

Will you acquit me of taking an unfair advantage of your goodness if I should be encouraged from those kind lines which I found enclosed with the [sermon?] to open a correspondence I am extremely desirous to establish. If there is anything unreasonable in the wish, forget that I ever formed it, and receive this letter as the tribute of my gratitude and of my friendship. It seems almost necessary that I should write, if it was only to apologise for those parts of my behaviour at N-bar[?] which occasioned you so much trouble. You will perhaps laugh at me when I tell you that the sensations I experienced in that ever to be remembered Wednesday were more [exquisite?] than any I had felt before. It was not for want of exertion, that I was so much apprized. I proved my fortitude to the utmost, and had the mortification to find it unable to afford me any material assistance. The recollection of the past, however, has not any longer a power to make me unhappy. If you could read my heart at this moment, you would not only be convinced that those unpleasant looks, (as Jane terms them) are entirely done away, but that every idea which brings my dear friend to my remembrance is accompanied with a delight and satisfaction which is not easily expressed. The time may possibly arrive when I shall be able to give you by something more than profession; that my affection and regard will be as lasting as it is sincere, and that I shall ever consider my own happiness as most compleat, when I am obliged with an opportunity of contributing in any degree to yours.

I have not lately seen any of my friends from Newcastle but they have endeavoured to make a pretty sufficient recompense for this disappointment by sending me some comfortable pacquets. Last night I had a whole folio from Jane. She complains &c &c. As this is a first epistle I will forbear to make it along one, when you have indulged me with an assurance that I am not doing wrong. I shall not be so ready to promise for any moderation. Once more let me entreat you to accept of my best love. The prospect of our encreasing friendship affords me in contemplation the highest enjoyments, and though the advantages on your side can by no means to equal to those derived from it on mine, yet the pleasure of sincerity may be reciprocal. From this consideration I will presume to urge you to write soon. It is more than a common interest which I now take in all your concerns, and my heart will ever be open to receive, and preserve faithfully, whatever relates to, or affects you.

 

 

5 March 1783.  Letter from K Willett to James Caldwell

Mr Caldwell

No.36 Suffolk Street

Charing Cross

London

N Castle

March 5th 1783

Yes! My dear friend, I do not forgive you, though your silence has not bee born without a good deal of concern, I cannot bear the thought of being forgot by one I esteem and value so highly. I hope I shall not live to see that day. You will always remember I look on you not as a common acquaintance or friend, there is a nearer tie that binds me which will never be forgot. (I hope by either party). We want you at home very much, our evenings are dull, and the winter seems to set in fresh again. Jenny has been a more [- corner missing off letter] she has still returns of her old complaint – expected Miss Caldwell this week, but for -  will scarce come till you return, which M - tells me may be a month yet, he is – into his new house and I am still in s- at the house. Cousin J Wedgwood dined – and today he begs to be remembered – have heard from you, Miss Wedgwood – to the Assembly, and danced and – who engaged her the evening sh- I fancy you will see my – you will have heard by – the Committee I have been – at Ladyday so give me a joint Bond for it, by my Brother’s advice have not yet had his answer, we have had Mr and Mrs Lexingham to drink tea with us. She wanted to see you much about a Clerk, she begged I would send her compliments and tell you how glad she should be to see you at [Mogipits?] you say not a word of Mr Byerley, I fear you never go there. I am very glad you are tired of London, and that you will enjoy this still town better for it when you return; the Dancing Assemblys are over which Mary seems to lament, they expect one at Miss Polly Latewards, perhaps you may come down time enough for it, in the mean time I know you will indulge me and steal a few moments for me, I have not many indulgences now, if you only say you are well it will give me more than pleasure. What ails that unhinged mind of yours that it cannot be quiet, what numberless good things have you to be thankful for, and that of business is not the least though often forgot, it is the best relief to the mind and yours would not do at all without it, and the line of life you are in has great advantages attending it, into what Gentile Company does it introduce you. I should have said Great Grand Noble &c &c &c. You are now engaged in serving your Country in a Publick Capacity, the result of which must do you great credit, and give you inward satisfaction but if all of this avails not, you have sufficient grounds for that inward peace but rest satisfied that what ever it is right. It is Sunday night and you will say I am moralizing but I have done excuse my great wish to see you happy. You deserve to be. All here beg their respects as do our neighbours who often enquire after you and to whom I paid your respects. God bless you, accept every good wish from your sincere and affectionate
K Willett

Poor Mrs Rhodes is very ill, if you see Mr Skerrett pray my respects.

 

 

 

 

19 March 1783.  List of payments made relating to an Accident.

Talk Fire and Explosion – List of payments made

19th March 1783

List of Payments made to the Sufferers by the Fire and Explosino of Gunpowder at Talk on the Hill in the County of Stafford at a Meeting of the Trustess held at the Roebuck in the County of Stafford on Saturday the 19th day of March 1785

Present

William Swinnerton Esq.

Charles Tollett Esq.

Rev. Mr. Fernyhough

Mr Matthew Lowe.

A Dividend of Ten Shillings in the Pound

To

Jesse Smith                  – 15/0/0

Charles Bate                – 5/0/0

Charles Hatton            – 1/3/7½

Samuel Boughey         – 0/7/7

John Froden                – 2/-/-

Charles Blundart         – 15/0/0

John Jones                   -0/10/-

Amy Basford              – 0/5/8 ½

Charles Salmon           – 1/13/6

Richard Whittal          – 1/17/4

Hannah Chadwick      – 0/6/-

Jonathan Buckley        – 0/17/3

-          44/1/

Brought Forward        44/1/0

John Zigler                  – 1/17/9

W. Colclough              – 0/10/6

Mary Hollins               – 5/3/0

Mary Lea                     – 1/11/0

Elizabeth Smith           – 15/0/0

John Forrest                – 15/0/0

John Lowe                  – 4/1/6

To Mr John Shaw by Draft on Stevenson at 1 Month 129/0/0

March 27th

To William Rhodes Draft on Stevenson 48/18/7

To Ditto Stevensons Part Note Bill and Cash for Elizabeth Rhodes 15/0/0

 

 

 

34-5869 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
4 May 1783
Short note from Sparrow & Caldwell to Mr Swift.  The note reads as follows:
Sir
We duly received your letter enclosing Halock & Co on Everitt & Drummond which is placed to Account.  The balance of Mr Kinnersley's Account together with a &ldots; shall be sent to you as soon as this matter is finally settled which will be in a day or two.
We are Sir
Your obedient servants
Sparrow & Caldwell.

 

34-5908 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
14 May 1783
Note from James Caldwell to Mr Swift regarding the estate of William Greatbach.  Peter Swift was an employee of Josiah Wedgwood as was also William Greatbach

 

34-5909 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
11 July 1783
Note from James Caldwell of Sparrow & Caldwell, presumably to Josiah Wedgwood.

 

34-5870 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
4 August 1783
Receipt which reads as follows:
Received 4 August 1783 of Josiah Wedgwood Esq Bills value Fifty five Pounds to be accounted for
£55
Sparrow & Caldwell.

 

21 August 1783.  Letter to James Caldwell from R Godwin.

Mr Caldwell

Attorney at Law

Newcastle under Lime

Dear Sir,

I beg you will send me your bill as soon as possible for, without it I cannot proceed in my collections. The little expense attending the final determination of the court of Kings Bench may be, I suppose nearly guessed at, or, if you please, at present omitted: but indeed you must send me the bill immediately. I must likewise have a brief as soon as possible, for our friends in Liverpool, Manchester, Chester and Bolton will be impatient to see it, and I have promised to draw out 2 or 3 copies of it as soon as it comes to my hands.

I am, in haste but with the utmost sincerity your friend and servant,

R Godwin

Thorncliffe

August 21st 1783

PS I cannot, I will not now attempt to express my gratitude to God almighty and you for the happy [‘event’ crossed out] and I trust, ever memorable event at Stafford on Friday last. I will however say that you and I are both rewarded, I fully, and you in part with a degree of success which always equaled [‘and surpassed’ crossed out] my most sanguine expectations and generally surpassed them.

 I must insist upon as full a charge for your trouble as if I were a rich stranger and you no way particular, interested in the cause. I must likewise declare to you, which I now do in a solemn manner, that I will not touch one farthing of your money; I am not disposed to do it, but, if I was, Mr Chidlaw, Mr Lord and scores of my brethren more, as well as others, would deservedly condemn my conduct.

I have indeed but collected £100, or a very little more; but, if you will send me your bill I can soon raise the greatest part of the rest, and if I be obliged to make up a deficiency of £20 or 30 it will give me no concern, in support of so important a cause which has lately had an issue so glorious.

I should forget, be particularly grateful to our worthy friend Mr Wedgwood whose public countenance was a great support and credit to our cause. Mr Boarcroft likewise deserves particular thanks: he discovered uncommon [liabilities?] and made uncommon exertion, in our favour: but what shall I say of 5 or 6 of our special jury; gentlemen [‘of’ crossed out] amongst the first rank for fortune and character in this country? Why that, from motives of justice and compassion so deeply written upon the face of our cause they for once son[hole in page] dispensed with the formal niceties of[hole in page, long?] testimony.

I thought to have concluded this letter with my name, but I find, whenever I have occasion to write to you, I cannot give over till the paper is full.

I am sending [you?] copies of an Advertisement for Liverpool, Chester, Manchester and Nottingham papers. I wish it could have had your remarks but it can [rivitat?] have yours nor that of any other friend and therefore I alone alas! Must answer for its imperfections.

 

 

30-22560 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
July to November 1783
Bill from Sparrow & Caldwell to Mrs Mary Bentley for £370.  (Mary Bentley was an aunt of Elizabeth Caldwell).

 

34-5910 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
17 November 1783
Note from James Caldwell to Mr Swift regarding Mr Wedgwood.

 

24 November 1783.  Recorded in Aris's Birmingham Gazette 
Estate in the Parish of Cheadle for sale: For further Particulars apply to Messrs Sparrow & Caldwell, Attornies at law, in Newcastle under Lyme.

 

34-5871 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
16 December 1783
Note from Sparrow & Caldwell

 

25 December 1783.  Recorded in the Marsh Trustees Minute Book.  
Second lease for 200 years granted 25 December 1783 to James Caldwell, Barrister = 3794 sq. yds.  On the North side of King Street adjacent to the Junction Canal.

 

34-5872 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
31 December 1783
Note from Sparrow & Caldwell

 

1784.  Recorded in the Newcastle-Under-Lyme Land Tax assessments.  James Caldwell is noted as owning No 3 King Street and of letting it to his partner John Martin from 1804-1809, also possibly before 1804 and after 1809.  John Martin died in December 1811.

 

8 June 1784.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.  James Caldwell married Elizabeth Stamford (St Werburgh, Derby).  She was the daughter of Thomas Stamford (1712-1787) and Hannah Stamford (nee Crompton, 1720-1788).

 

 

4 June 1784. Note to James Caldwell from his father JC of Scotland (died 1791).

James Caldwell

Newcastle

I never in my life was joyntley Bound in a Bond but once with Mr Sprout and Andrew
Onderson upwards now of Thirty years which was cancelled soon after by Onderson, and Mr [Welby’s?] Agent to Mr Egerton of Alton. I never borrowed any money in my life for which I give a Bond - or note of hand as Thanks to a good and Kind Providence I never had occasion, only some few times in my troubled life time have Borrowed from him only Twenty Thirty or some little many Pounds, but for which he never Regained my note as I always Paid him soon. This I thought Proper to Attest this 4th day of August 1784.
James Caldwell.
Received June of 1775 of the James Caldwell

 

 

30-22561 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
30 October 1784
Note which reads as follows:
Sir
By the Bearer you receive £136:11:8 the sum desired.
I am for Messers Sparrow & Caldwell 
Sir your most obedient servant
Huimmereton
Newcastle 30 Oct 1784

 

30-22562 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
17 December 1784
Note which reads as follows:
Sir
By the bearer you receive one hundred pounds being one years interest of £2,000 due to Mr Wedgwood from Mr John Smallwood of Drayton and received from him on Monday last.  You will be pleased to send a receipt for the same, Messers Sparrow & Caldwell having given Mr Smallwood one.
I am Sir for Messers Sparrow & Caldwell
your most obedient servant
Huimmereton
Newcastle  17 Dec 1784

 

1784.  Recorded in Bailey's British Directory.
Sparrow and Caldwell, Attornies at Law, Newcastle under Lyme.

 

1784.  Recorded in the Newcastle-Under-Lyme Land Tax assessments.
No 8 Red Lion Square, owned by Thomas Sparrow (and formally occupied by Thomas Sparrow in 1783), occupied by James Caldwell in 1784 and 1785.  Tax assessed 12 shillings per year.

 

1785.  James Caldwell appears to have moved his family from No 8 Red Lion Square to No 3 King Street in Newcastle-Under-Lyme.

 

Letter to James Caldwell from Peter Crompton.

Mr Caldwell

Newcastle

Staffordshire

En Angleterre

Leydon, January 16 1785

Dear Sir,

I received your very affectionate letter a few days since, by which I am sorry to find how much trouble I have occasioned you by not giving the proper information in mine with regard to the Posts to Holland . Accept my warmest thanks for it, and be assured that its long arrival was imputed to the true cause alone, well knowing that no slight whatsoever could proceed from a person whom I have the honor and happiness to rank amongst the number of my real friends. Concerning the proceedings of the Emperor and the Dutch, I am as much and perhaps more in the dark than yourself, the freedom of the Press being restrained, necessarily involves the Public and the Politicians in uncertainties, some are of opinion that Peace will soon be re-established, other incline to War, and a third part (though seemingly entirely without foundation) suppose should the French take a decided part with Holland, the English would afford assistance to the Emperor; this, whether I regard the matter in a general or partial view will not I hope be the case; in the late War the Dutch carried their resentment so high that it was very disagreeable for any English who might be in the place, so much so indeed, that many who had been almost naturalized to the Country found themselves necessitated to quit it and returned again when Peace had been declared. Be it as it may however I trust I shall not be much incommoded as my stay now will be but that, since I intend to set out for Paris in about a months time. My route lies through the field of action, this alarmed me at first, but I have been lately assured that my passage can not be impede, provided I obtain a Passport from the College.

I shall regret leaving Leyden for several particulars, we have here an agreeable, though small society, a town excellently calculated for study, free from all disturbances and most amusements; the advantages I shall meet with in France will I hope more than counter balance the difficulties of getting there, they have many public hospitals which [are?] altogether necessary to m- [hole in letter] and I am told there is a fine – to books of every kind; the library here is [hole in letter] composed of a collection of the best books both ancient and modern in every science, it is regulated in such a manner as to be of the least possible utility, it is free to every one four hours in the week, but it is contrary to the regulations that any book should be taken out of the room by an except the Professors; they have many exclusive privileges such as a freedom from all taxes which is of great importance in a country like this where they are laid upon the necessaries instead of the superfluities of life; they receive also from the state 2000 florins a year each, besides having the different articles found them which may be wanted in the course of their lectures. My paper tells me I must bid you adieu, and believe me yours sincerely Peter Crompton. Remember me affectionately to Mrs Caldwell. Mr D desires me to insert his [camper?]

 

34-5920 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
13 June 1785
Letter from James Caldwell to Josiah Wedgwood regarding a meeting of the "Potters".

 

September 1785.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.
Baptism: Hannah Eliza, daughter of Mr James Caldwell, born September 11.

 

17 April 1786. Recorded in Aris's Birmingham Gazette.
James Caldwell executor to Thomas Wedgwood, Master Potter, of the Overhouse, Burslem, (together with Josiah Wedgwood II).

 

March 28, 1786.  All Persons having any Demands upon the Estate of Mr Thomas Wedgwood, late of Burslem, in the County of Stafford, Potter, deceased, are requested to send a state of their Accounts to Josiah Wedgwood, of Etruria, in the County of Stafford, Esq., or Mr James Caldwell, Attorney at Law, in Newcastle under Lyme, the Executors named in the Will; and such Persons as stand indebted to the said Estate are desired to pay their respective Debts to the Executors immediately.

 

34-5873 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
12 July 1786?
Receipt from James Caldwell to Mr Swift.

 

27 December 1786.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.
Baptism: James Stamford, son of Mr James Caldwell.

 

34-5911 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
5 January 1787
Bill for £150 from Sparrow & Caldwell to Mr Swift at Etruria.

 

18 June 1787. Recorded in Aris's Birmingham Gazette
The Creditors of Thomas Bolton, late of Lane delph, in the County of Stafford, Potter, deceased, and also of Ann Bolton, Sarah Bolton, and Hannah Bolton, late of the same Place, Potters & Copartners, Daughters of the said Thomas Bolton, deceased, are requested to send a State of their respective Accounts to Messrs Sparrow & Caldwell, Attornies at Law, in Newcastle under Lyme, in the said County of Stafford, forthwith, in order that the same may be examined and adjusted previous to the 13t" Day of July next; on which Day the Trustees appointed for the Sale of the Estates, late of the said Thomas Bolton, deceased, do hereby give Notice, that they Intend to meet at the Roe-Buck Inn, in Newcastle under Lyme aforesaid, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon, finally to close and discharge such Accounts.
June 15, 1787.

 

September 1787.  Thomas Sparrow is noted as the Secretary of the Trent & Mersey Canal company.  See page 72 of "The Trent & Mersey Canal Company".

 

34-5912 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
16 March 1788
Note from James Caldwell to Mr Swift regarding Mr Collision.

 

34-5913 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
9 June 1788
Note from James Caldwell to Mr Swift regarding Mr Salmon and also regarding a sum of £16:10:0 received from Mrs French.

 

30-22563 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
1785-1788
A statement of Bank Account for J Wedgwood from Sparrow & Caldwell £6,252:13:5

 

30-22559 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
November 1782 to September 1788
Bill from Sparrow & Caldwell to Josiah Wedgwood.  This is a very detailed document and possibly gives a good overview of all the business performed in this period.

 

13 March 1788.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.
Burial: Mary, daughter of Mr Coardwell, Attorney.

 

30-22559 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
November 1782 to September 1788
Bill from Sparrow & Caldwell to Josiah Wedgwood.  This is a very detailed document and possibly gives a good overview of all the business performed in this period.

 

2 February 1789.  Note from Aris's Birmingham Gazette.

NEWCASTLE SUBSCRIPTION DANCING and CARD ASSEMBLIES, will be held at the Great Room, at the Roe Buck, on the three following Days, viz.  Thursday, February 12; Thursday, March 12; Thursday, April 9.
Gentlemen's Subscription Tickets for 3 Nights 10s 6d
Ladies and Gentlemen: 5s Od
Non Subscribers, Gentlemen for each Night: 5s Od
Ladies and Gentlemen: 2s 6d
Tea and Cards Included
JOHN WEDGWOOD, Esq.)
JAMES CALDWELL, Esq.) Stewards
Newcastle, Feb. 4, 1789

 

Draft copy of a letter from James Caldwell regarding his purchase of the Montpelier Estate (Linley Wood)

Newcastle 2nd February 1789

Sir,

I received yesterday, but no, I must confess, without some surprise, the favour of your letter accompanying the Draft of the Conveyance of the Montpelier Estate.

I cannot persuade myself, but that on a moment’s recollection, both you and Mr Yoxall must be fully satisfied that the insertion of the Covenant to which you object, arose from the question which was started by Mr Beard, relative to the liability of the Purchaser to see to the Application of his purchase money, and not from any difficulty in respect to the execution of the Conveyance by Mr Lawton, which was at that very time, unless [bad?] to be got over, by what you were pleased to call the very liberal, and certainly more voluntary allowance which I agreed to make to him.

I hope that it not be necessary for me to enter into any particulars respecting this disagreeable and long protracted affair; [‘especially’ crossed out] as I could but feel conscious to myself of having acted throughout the whole with candour and openness, and of having discovered, what I really felt, a sincere wish to accommodate both you and Mr Yoxall in every thing that was consistent with my own safety; but if surely never could be imagined for a moment that I would consent to accept doubtful or defective Title, nor can I bring myself to believe that you should either wish or believe me to be capable of doing so very weak and absurd a thing.

When the Contract was entered into with Mr Yoxall, it was as he very well knows and as from my opinion of that gentleman, I am [‘confident’ crossed out] persuaded that he will acknowledge, in general terms, an Agreement [‘in my part’ crossed out] generally per my part to give the price that was fixed [‘and which you have so often declared to be in your opinion an outside one, but, undeniably’ crossed out] in the common principle and presumption of a good [‘Title’ crossed out] one being made out. An abstract of the Title was afterwards delivered [in the commission?] with the price endorsed, many letters written which are now in my possession and promises given to compleat the contract and part of the purchase money received and paid [‘on person confidence and good opinion’ crossed out]. All that passed afterwards [insert unreadable] was as you very well know [‘that it must be’ crossed out] mere matter of accommodation amongst the parties, and in regard to the mention of my acceptance of such a Title as the Trustees could make without the concurrence of Mr Lawton we are certainly meant and understood what could alone at least be meant and understood [anyhow?] the best Title which the Trustees had it in their power to make and not such a one as might [sent their convince?].That Title I am [nin?] and have all along been ready to accept. I am ready to accept a Conveyance from the Trustee alone on having the parties [pardon?] – applied in payment of Debts mentioned in the Schedule and and [enhancing, entering?] copies of the necessary Deeds with undertakings to produce them delivered. I am ready to accept a Conveyance from the parties and Mr Lawton, and permit the purchase money to be applied as the parties requested on being satisfied that the money then is a balance due to the Trustees from the Trust Estate more than equal to my portion money and making a Covenant from them to indemnify against any persons claiming [against?] the Trust Deed with the necessary copies of Deeds and undertakings to produce them delivered. I am ready to set aside [insert line unreadable] any thing that has hitherto passed respecting the Title and to accept it in such a form as  shall be recommended to me by any Gentleman of eminence and respectability in the profession or I am ready to file a Bill, or if [‘or if it be more agreeable to’ crossed out] you will file a Bill to put in an answer in the shortest and easiest made possible in order to obtain the Declaration of the Court of Chancery and get the Title and conveyance settled by the Masters.

I as I have already

 

 

 

 

To Hold unto and to the use of the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assigns for ever upon trust that they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall thinking  - should sell and dispose absolutely convey the said Messuages and Tenements Lands and Hereditaments and the Fee Simple and Inheritance thererof either entire and together or in separate lots as they should think most proper for the best rate or pride that could or might reasonably and conveniently be had or gotten for the same and did or should retain or pay and apply the money arising by such sale in satisfaction of such part of the debts as were then due and owing from the said John Lawton as they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their executors administrators and assignees should think proper And it is by the now reciting Indenture declared and [‘agreed’ crossed out] directed that the receipt or receipts of the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assignees should effectually discharge the purchaser or purchasors of the said premises or any part thereof of [spom?] so much of the purchase money for which such receipt or receipts should be given and that such purchaser and purchasors should afterwards be acquitted and discharged of an from the same and should not be responsible for any loss, misapplication or nonapplication of the said purchase money or any part thereof as in and by the said herein before in part recited Indres [Indenture?] of Lease and Rebase reference being thereunto had will more fully and at large appear. And whereas the said [‘John Beckett’ crossed out] James Caldwell hath contracted and agreed with the –

Draft of an agreement

This Indenture made the – day of – in the 28th year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the third by the Grace of God of Great Britain, ffrance and Ireland, King Defender of the ffaith and so forth and in the year of our Lord One thousand seven hundred and eighty eight [1788] between Charles Bate of Nantwich in the County of Chester Gent and William Yoxall of Nantwich aforesaid Gent in the first part John Lawton now or late of Lawton in the County of Chester Esq of the 2nd part and James Caldwell of Newcastle under Lyme in the County of Stafford Gent of the third part and Abraham Crompton, Gent of Chorley aforesaid – of the 4th part, whereas by certain [Indentures?] of Lease and Release bearing date respectively on or about the fourth and fifth days of December which was in the year of our Lord 1778 made or mentioned to be made between the said John Lawton of the one part and the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall of the other part reciting as therein is recited It is witnessed that for the consions therein mentioned the said John Lawton would grant, bargain sell alien release and confirm unto the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assigns and amongst other Hereditaments all being the messuages or tenements lands and Hereditaments therein and herein after particularly mentioned and described and intended to be hereby granted and released said Charles Bate and William Yoxall with the consent and approbation of the said John Lawton for the absolute purchase of the fee simple and inheritance of the said messuages or tenements lands and Hereditaments and premises [‘hereinafter particularly mentioned and described and intended to be hereby granted and released’ crossed out] at or for the price or sum of £750. Now this Indre [Indenture] witnesseth that in pursuance of the performance of this Agreement and for and in consideration of the sum of £750 of lawful money of Great Britain to the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall in hand well and truly paid by the said John Beckett at or before the sealing and delivery of these presents with the inset and approbation of the said John Lawton certified by his being made a party to and seals the receipt and payment whereof this the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall do hereby [responsible?] acknowledge and thereof and of and from the same and every part thereof  do and each of them doth acquit release and discharge the said John Beckett his heirs executors and assignees and every of  them for ever by these presents and also in consion of the sum of 10s of like lawful money of Great Britain to the said John Lawton in hand also paid by the said James Caldwell [‘John Beckett’ crossed out] at or before the sealing and delivery [‘of the said presents’ crossed out] him of the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall have and each of them hath bargained sold aliened and released and by these presents do and each of them doth bargain sell alien and release and the said John Lawton hath granted bargained sold aliened released ratified and confirmed and by these presents doth grant bargain sell alien release ratify and confirm unto the said James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton the and in their actual possession now being by virtue of a bargain and sale to them thereof made by the said Charles Bate, William Yoxall and John Lawton for the term of one whole year in Conson of 5s by Indenture bearing date the day next before the day of the date of these presents and executed before the execution hereof and by force of the statute made for transferring uses into and to their heirs and assigns all that messuage or tenement situate standing and being at Montpelier in the Hamlet or liberty of Talk ‘oth’ Hill aforesaid in the parish of Audley in the said County of Stafford with all houses edifices barns stables buildings yards orchards gardens arable lands meadows pastures feedings woods underwoods and other the lands Hereditaments and appurtenances to the said messuages or tenements belonging or appertaining or reputed so to be or therewith usually held used or enjoyed  and which were formerly in the tenure holding or occupation of the said Henry Hough Gent and Mary Rowley and afterwards in the several holdings of Timothy Hope, Thomas Johnson and John Lowe, late in possession of the said John Lawton, his assignees or [attendents?] but now of – his assignees or [Hereditaments?] and which 9, lands contain in the whole by estimation – acres or thereabouts to the same more or less and the revenue and revenues, rent and rents yearly and other rents issues and profits of all singular the said premises and all the estate right Title intered use trust benefit property claim and demand whatsoever of them the said Charles Bate, William Yoxall and Charles Lawton and each and every of them in to from or out of the same premises way or any party or parcel thereof to have and to hold the said messuages or tenement lands Hereditaments and all and singular other the premises hereby granted and received or mentioned, intended so to be and every part and parcel thereof with their and every of their appurtenances unto the said [‘John Beckett’ crossed out] James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton, their heirs and assignees to the only proper use and behoof of the said [‘John Beckett’ crossed out] James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton their heirs and assignees [‘for ever’ crossed out] in trust nevertheless as to the Estate and interest of the said Abraham Crompton the younger for the said James Caldwell his heirs and assignees for ever and to or for no other use interest or purpose – and the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall for themselves [seolly?] of further[sertgt?] respective heirs executors and administrators do and each of them doth covenant promise and agree to and with the said [‘John Beckett’ crossed out] James Caldwell his heirs and assignees by these presents that it shall and that they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall have not nor either of them hath at any time heretofore made and or committed or wittingly or willingly suffered to be made done so committed any act matter or thing whatsoever whereby or by means whereof the said messuages or tenements lands Hereditaments and premises hereby granted and [telled?] or mentioned or intended so to be or any part thereof is are can shall or may be impeached charged incumbered or affected in Title Charge Estate or otherwise however And the said John Lawton for himself his heirs executors and administrators doth covenant promise and agree to and with the said James Caldwell his heirs and assignees by these presents in manner and form following that is to say that for and notwithstanding any act matter or thing whatsoever by him the sad John Lawton done committed or suffered to the contrary they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and John Lawton now at the time of the sealing delivery of these presents are and rents issues and profits thereof and of every part and parcel thereof to his and their own use to have receive and take without any the lawful let suit trouble denial eviction or interruption whatsoever for by the said John Lawton his heirs and assigns or any other person or persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or do claim by here under or in Trust for them either or any of them and that free and clear and freely and clearly acquitted exonerated and discharged or otherwise well and sufficiently saved defended kept harmless and indemnified of from an agreement all and all manner of former and other gifts grants bargain sales leases mortgages [formtures?] and owers uses trusts wills intails statutes recognizance judgments extents execution and of from and of and all and singular other estates titles troubles burthens charges encumbrances whatsoever at anytime heretofore had made done committed occasioned or suffered or to be had made done committed occasioned or suffered by the said John Lawton his heirs or assigns or any other person or persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or to claim by from under or in trust for him them or any of them and moreover that he the said John Lawton and his heirs and all and every other person or persons whomsoever having or lawfully claiming or who shall or may have lawfully claim any estate right title benefit trust or interest either at Law or in equity of into from or out of the said messuage or tenements lands hereditaments and premises hereby granted and released or ment and intended so to be or any part thereof by from under or in trust for him them or any of them shall and will from time to time and at all times hereafter on every reasonable request and at the proper costs and charges of the said [‘John Beckett’ crossed out] James Caldwell his heirs executors administrators or assigns make do acknowledge – suffer and except or cause or procure to be made done acknowledge levied suffered and executed all and every such further and other lawful and reasonable acts deeds devices conveyances and assurances in the law whatsoever for the further better more perfect and absolute granting conveying and assuring the said messuages or tenement lands hereditaments and premises hereby granted and released and every part and parcel thereof with their and every of their appurtenances unto the said James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton  the yt their heirs and assigns in trust nevertheless as to the estate fortune of the said Abraham Crompton the younger for the said James Caldwell and his issue and his heirs or assigns or his or their Counsel learned in the law shall be lawfully and reasonably devised or advised required in Witness and

[down side of page] May be lawful to and for the said James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton their heirs and assigns according to their estates as and from time to time at all times hereafter [penually?] and quietly to cater and come into and purchase hold occupy possess and enjoy the said messuages or tenements lands Hereditaments and premises hereby granted and released or mentioned and intended so to be and the rents incomes and profits thereof and of  every part and parcel to his and their own use to have receive without any loss, suit, trouble denial circution of or by any person or present – - lawfully claim or to claim by from them or either of them or by entire of the said –

This Indenture made the – day of – in the twenty eighth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the Third by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland King Defender to the Faith &c and in the year of our Lord 1788 Between Charles Bate of Nantwich in the County of Chester Gent: and William Yoxall of Nantwich aforesaid Gent: of the first part, John Lawton now or late of Lawtin in the said County of Chester Esq: and Ann his wife of the second part James Caldwell of Newcastle under Lyme in the County of Stafford Gent: of the third part and Abraham Crompton the Younger of Chorley in the County of Lancaster Esq. (a Justice nominated by the said James Caldwell for the purpose hereinafter mentioned) of the fourth part Where as a certain Indenture of Lease and Release bearing date respectively on or about the fourth and fifth days of December which was in the year of our Lord 1778 and made or mentioned to be made between the said John Lawton of the one part and the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall of the other part Reciting as therein is recited It is Witnessed that for the consions therein mentioned the said John Lawton did grant bargain sell alien release and confirm with the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assigns amongst other Heirs All and singular the messuage or tenement lands and heredits therein and herein after particularly mentioned and described and intended to be hereby granted and released to Hold unto and to the use of the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assigns for ever Upon Trust that they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assigns did and shall with all convenient speed sell and absolutely convey the said messuage or tenement lands and heredits and the Fee Simple and Inheritance thereof either entire and together or in separate and distinct Lots as they should think most proper for the best rate and price that could or might be reasonably and conveniently had or gotten for the same and did and should retain or pay and apply the money arising by such sale in satisfaction and discharge of such part of the debts as were then due and owing from the said John Lawton as they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their executors and administrators or assigns would think proper And it is by the now reciting Indenture declared and directed that the receipt or receipts of the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall their heirs and assigns should effectually discharge the purchaser or purchasors of the said premises or any part thereof of and from so much of the purchase money for which such receipt or receipts should be given and that such purchaser and purchasers should afterwards be acquitted and discharged of and form the same And should not be responsible for any loss misapplication or nonapplication of the said purchase money or any part thereof as in and by the said hereinbefore in part recited indenture of Lease and Release reference being thereunto had will more fully and atlarge appear And whereas the said James Caldwell hath constructed and agreed with the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall with the consent and approbation of the said John Lawton for the absolute purchase of the Fee Simple and Inheritance of the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises at or for the price or sum of £750 Now This Identure Witnesseth that in pursuance and performance of the said Agreement and for and in consion of the Sum of £750 of lawful money of Great Britain to the said Charles Bates and William Yoxall in hand well and truly paid by the said James Caldwell at or before the sealing and delivery of these presents with the Consent and approbation of the said John Lawton testified by his being made a party to and sealing and delivering these presents the receipt whereof they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall do hereby acknowledge and thereof and of and from the same and every part thereof they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and also the said John Lawton do and each and every of them doth aquit release and discharge the said James Caldwell his heirs executors and administrators and every of them for ever by these presents And Also in consion of the Sum of 10s of like lawful money of Great Britain to the said John Lawton in hand also paid by the said James Caldwell at or on before the sealing and delivery of the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall Have and each of them Hath bargained sold aliened released and confirmed and by these presents Do and each of them Doth bargain sell alien release and confirm And the said John Lawton hath granted bargained sold aliened released ratified and confirmed and by these presents Doth grant bargain sell alien release ratify and confirm unto the said Jame Caldwell (in his Actual possession now being by virtue of a bargain and sale to him thereof made by the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall, and John Lawton for the term of one whole year in consion of 5s by Indenture bearing date the day next before the say of the date of these presents and executed before the execution hereof and by force of the Statute made for transferring uses into possession and to his heirs All that messuage or tenement situate standing and being in the Hamlett or liberty of Talk oth’ Hill in the parish of Audley in the County of Stafford called the Wood otherwise Linly Wood otherwise Montpelier with all houses edifices barns stables buildings yards orchards gardens arable lands meadows pastures feedings woods underwoods and other the lands heredits and appurts to the said messuage or tenement belonging or appertaining or reputed so to be or therewith usually held used or enjoyed and which were formerly in the tenure holding or occupation of Thomas Fernyhough Gent and Mary Rowley and afterwards in the several holdings of Timothy Hope, Thomas Johnson and John Lowe late in the possession of the said John Lawton his assigns or undertenants but now of -  his assigns or undertenants and which said lands contain in the whole by estimation – acres or thereabouts be the same more or less And the reverse and reversions remr and remns yearly and other rents issues and profits of all and singular the said premises And all the Estate right Title interest use trust benefit properly claim and demand whatsoever of them the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and John Lawton and each and every of them of into from or out of the same premises or any part or parcel thereof To Have and to Hold the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and all and singular other the premises hereby granted and released or mentioned and intended so to be and every part and parcel thereof with their and every of their appurts unto the said James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton and the heirs and assigns of the said James Caldwell for ever In Trust nevertheless as to the Estate (and Interest) of the said Abraham Crompton for the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns for ever and to for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever And the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall for themselves severally and for their several and respective heirs executors and administrators do hereby severally but not jointly covenant and declare to and with the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns that they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall respectively have not at any time here to fore made done committed or executed or wittingly or willingly permitted or suffered any Act Deed matter or thing whatsoever whereby or by means whereof the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and related or mentioned or intended so to be or any poart thereof are or is or can shall or may be impeached charged incumbered or affected in Title Charge Estate or otherwise howsoever And the said John Lawton for himself his heirs executors and administrators doth covenant promise and agree to and with the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns by these presents in manner and form following that is to say that they the said John Lawton and Ann his wife shall and will as of Michaelmas Term last or in as appointed Hilary Term next or some other subsequent Term Acknowledge and levy before his Majesty’s Justices of the Court of Common Pleas at Westminster one or more Fine or Fines Sur Conuzance de droit come ceo &c whereupon proclamations shall and may be had and made according to the form of the Statute in that case made and provided and the usual course of Fines and such cases accustomed unto the said James Caldwell and his heirs of the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and released  or mentioned and intended to be by such apt and convenient name and names quantities qualities number of acres or other descriptions as shall be thought necessary or requisite to ascertain and comprehend the same which said Fine or Fines so as assured or in any other manner or at any other time or times levied or to be acknowledged and levied by or between the said parties to these presents or any of them or whereto they or any of them are or is or shall be parties or a party or  - of or concerning the said heredits and premises hereby granted and released or mentioned or intended so to be or any part thereof shall be and enure and shall be adjudged deemed construed and taken to be and enure and are hereby declared by all the said parties to these presents to be and enure to the use and behoof of the said James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton and the heirs and assigns of the said James Caldwell  In Trust nevertheless as to the Estate of the said Abraham Crompton for the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns for ever and to or for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever And Also that for an notwithstanding any Act matter or thing whatsoever by him the said John Lawton done committed or suffered to be contrary they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and John Lawton or some or one of them now at the time of the Sealing and Delivery of these presents are and stand or is and standeth lawfully rightfully and absolutely seized in their or some of one of their demesne as of the of and in the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and released or mentioned and intended so to be and of every part and parcel thereof with their and every of their appurtenances of a good sure lawful absolute and undefeazible Estate of Inheritance in Fee Simple to them and their heirs or the heirs of some or one of revocation or limitation of use or uses or any other matter restraint or thing whatsoever to alter change charge revoke make void lessen or incumber the same And likewise that for and notwithstanding any such Act matter or thing as aforesaid they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and John Lawton or some or one of them now have in themselves or himself good right full power and lawful and absolute authority to grant release and convey the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and released or mentioned and intended so to be and every part and parcel thereof with their and every of their appurtenances unto the said James Caldwell and Abraham Crompton and the heirs and assigns of the said James Caldwell in manner aforesaid and according to the purport true intent and meaning of the presents And further that it is shall and may be lawful to and for the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns from time to time and at all times hereafter peaceably and quietly to enter and come into and upon have hold occupy possess the messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and released or mentioned and intended so to be and the rents issues and profits thereof and of every part and parcel thereof to his and their own use to have and receive and take without any the lawful let suit trouble device eviction or interruption whatsoever of or by the said John Lawton his heirs or assigns or any other person or persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or to claim by from under or in trust for them or either or any of them And that free and clear and freely and clearly aquitted exonerated and discharged or otherwise well and sufficiently saved defended kept harmless and indemnified of from and against all and all manner of former and other gifts grants bargain sales leases mortgages tintures dowers uses trusts wills intails statutes recognizances judgements extents execution and of from and against all and singular other Estate titles troubles burthens charges and incumbrances whatsoever at any time heretofore had made done committed occasioned or sufferd or to be had made done committed occasioned or suffered by the said John Lawton his heirs or assigns or any other person or persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or to claim by from under or in trust for him them or any of them And Moreover that he the said John Lawton and his heirs and all and every other person or persons whomsoever having or lawfully claiming or who shall or may have or lawfully claim any Estate Right Title Benefit Trust or Interest either at Law or in Equity of into from or out of the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and released or mentioned and intended so to be or any part thereof by from under or In Trust for him them or any of them and shall and will  from time to time and at all times hereafter on every reasonable request and at the proper costs and charges of the said James Caldwell his heirs or assigns make do acknowledge levy suffer and execute cause or procure to be made done lawful and reasonable Acts Deeds Devices Conveyances and Assurances in the Law whatsoever for the further better more perfect and absolute granting conveying and assuring the said messuage or tenement lands heredits and premises hereby granted and released and every part or parcel thereof with their and every of their appurtenances unto or to the use of the sais James Caldwell his heirs and assigns or as he or they shall direct or appoint as by the said James Caldwell his heirs or assigns or his or their Counsel learned in the Law shall be lawfully and reasonably devised or advised and required And the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and John Lawton for themselves severally and respectively and for their several and respective heirs executors and administrators do and each and every of them doth covenant promise and agree to and with the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns That they the said Charles Bate and William Yoxall and John Lawton their respective heirs and assigns shall and will from time to time and at all time hereafter at the request costs and charges of the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns so long as the said hereinbefore in part recited Indenture of Lease and Release of the 4th and 5th December 1778 and also certain Articles of Agreement bearing date on or about the 24th day of January 1770 made subsequent to and in consequence of the marriage of the said John Lawton with Ann his present wife shall remain in their or any of their possession respectively produce and shew forth the same unto the said James Caldwell his heirs or his or their Agents or Counsel or upon any Trial at Law or in Equity or otherwise as occasion shall be an require for the manifestation and confirmation of the Title of the said James Caldwell his heirs and assigns to the said hereinbefore granted and released messuage lands heredits and premises every or any party or parcel thereof In Witness &c.

Date 1788

Messrs Bate & Yoxall Trustees for Sale of part of the Estate of John Lawton Esq and the said John Lawton to Mr James Caldwell and his Trustee.

Draft release of a messuage or tenement lands and heredits called Montpelier situate near Talk on the Hill in the County of Stafford .

Caldwell

 

22 March 1789.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.
Baptism: Mary, daughter of Mr James Caldwell, born 14 March.

 

25 March 1789. Title deed for the Linley Wood Estate bought by James Caldwell.  This title deed is in the Stafford Record Office (4229/6/2/2)
ABSTRACT OF THE TITLE OF JAMES STAMFORD CALDWELL ESQ TO A FREEHOLD ESTATE SITUATE AT ALSAGER IN THE PARISH OF BARTHOMLEY, CHESHIRE (SRO: 4229/6/2/2)
25 & 26 March 1789, Indenture between the Heirs & Executors of Edward Salmon, late of Hassall in the County of Chester, Esq. deceased and James Caldwell of Newcastle under Lyme, in the County of Stafford, Gent.; . . .  that the said Richard Lowndes Salmon had lately contracted and agreed with the said James Caldwell for the asolute sale to him of the Messuages Lands Tenements and Hereditaments thereinafter particularly mentioned and described for the sum of S4,750:
All that Messuage Farm or Tenement with the Appurtenances situate lying & being in the County of Chester theretofore in the tenure holding or occupation of Acton Fox the younger then late of [blank] but then of William Dale his assignees or undertenants And also all those several closes pieces or parcels of land arable meadow or pasture ground situate lying and being in Alsager aforesaid usually used or occupied with the said Messuage Farm or Tenement and commonly called or known by the several names following (namely) The Moss Meadow, The Further Corn Hay, the Near Corn Hay, Nathans Field, Big Meadow, Stoned Horse Field, Bottoms, Bottom Meadow, Brookfield, Further Wadfield, Near Wadfield, V%Theat Field, Kiln Meadow, Stack Yard Wall Finney, Near Pleck, Further Pleck, Near Middle Field, Further Middle Field, Broomy Bank, Rough Riding, The Wood, Rye Sitch, Little Randle, Big Randle, Little Hill, Big Hill, Mear Lake, Mear Lake Meadow, Banky Swallow Moor, Flatt Swallow Moor, the [blank], the [blank], the [blank], Margerys Bank, Prospect Bank, Little Hilditches Field, Big Hilditches Field, Shoulder of Mutton, Little Birchen Field, Big Birchen Field, Birchen Field Meadow, and the Lane. . .
And also all that Messuage Farm or Tenement situate in Alsager aforesaid then in the holding or occupation of Joseph Hall his assignees or undertenants And also all those three several closes pieces or parcels of Land Meadow or Pasture Ground used or occupied with the said last mentioned Messuage or Farm and commonly called or known by the names of The Birchen Croft, The Well Meadow, the Over Lane which said several Closes pieces or parcels od land or ground thereinbefore particularly mentioned and described contain in the whole by mensuration 211 acres 2 roods 30 perches or thereabouts And also all those 6 several Dwelling house or Tenements situate standing and being in Alsager aforesaid with the Gardens and appurtenances thereto belonging then in the several tenure or occupation of [blank] And all houses &c
And all other the Messuages Lands Tenements & hereditaments whatsoever of him the said Richard Lowndes Salmon situate lying & being in Alsager aforesaid
To hold unto the said James Caldwell & Abraham Crompton the younger

 

13 April 1789.  Note from Aris's Birmingham Gazette.
NEWCASTLE CONCERT
On Friday the 24,h of April instant, will be a Subscription CONCERT in the Theatre.  Vocal Parts by Mr Savile, and others.
Subscribers Tickets, 
Boxes, 5s.  Non Subscribers Tickets, ditto, 6s.  Pit and Gallery, 3s.
Stewards
THOMAS FLETCHER, Esq.
JOHN TURTON, Esq.
JOHN WEDGWOOD, Esq.
JAMES CALDWELL, Esq.
Subscriptions received by Mr Alcock, and Mr Smith, Printer.

 

 

25 July 1789. Notes relating to the purchase of the Montpelier Estate later called Linley Wood.

Additional Tracts and Observations stated by Messrs Bate and Yoxall.

For Mr Atherton

25th July 1789

 

WR Peake

For J Caldwell

Mr Bate and Mr Yoxall apprehend in necessary to state in the case intended to be laid before Mr Atherton, that the Trust contains in the Deed (a Copy of which is left for his perusal) enables the Trustees to retain or apply the purchase money arising from the sale of the Montpelier Estate; and as there was large sums now due to them from Mr Lawton, they conceive themselves warranted to retain the purchase money towards satisfaction of their Debts.

That all the debts mentioned in the Deed, as well at the most considerable of those that are specified in the Schedule, have been discharged by the Trustees, and the remainder of those debts are secured by the joint Bond of Mr Lawton and Trustees.

That the Covenant for quiet enjoyment against Mr Lawton’s creditors, whose Debts are enumerated in the Trust Deed, was introduced in the Trustees apprehension, to supply the want of Mr Lawton’s concurrence; but as he will join in the Conveyance to Mr Caldwell, that Covenant might not be expected.

That the purchase money being engaged to discharge a Debt contracted by the Trustees in consequence of their engagements with Mr Lawton cannot be now applied in exoneration of the Debts scheduled upon the Deed of Trust.

That upon the 7th November 1771 Mr Lawton executed a Warrant of Attorney for confessing judgment to the Trustees for £1,000, which was entered up in or about Easter Term 1780, on which a [ffisgge?] was issued, but no further proceedings were taken under it.

That the Trust Deed contain no Covenant for the Title except for further expenses, and it is a joint rule, that Trustees, in cases like the present, ought to Covenant only that they have done no Act to incumber.

That no part of the scheduled Debts are a specific Lien in themselves on the Trust Estate (abstracted from the Deed of Trust) and become such only by the Trust, and therefore they must be discharged on the Terms of it.

That the Decree in the case of Lloyd and Baldwin was a specific Lien, and if a Decree had been obtained for payment of Mr Lawton’s Debts (which would have had the same effect as a Judgment) in such case it would have been incumbent on the Purchaser to see his purchase money applied in discharge of Debts of that quality; but that the present schedule of Debts, being only Bond Debts, do not effect the Estate or the Purchase of it.

That the case of Lloyd and Baldwin, though founded on just principles, is not applicable to the subject matter, because it can’t here be said that the Trustees have changed, altered, or lessened the security of the Creditors or reversed the order of things, for in receiving the money arising from sale of the Estate, they are forwarding and executing the Trust.

That if Mr Lawton had sold this Estate instead of conveying it to the Trustees, and had dissipated the money instead of applying it for the honest purpose of paying his Debts, Creditors of the scheduled description could not have [reverted?] for satisfaction of the estate, or to the purchase of it, even if the purchaser had notice of such Debts.

That as by the Trust Deed only those Debts are become Liens on this Estate, if the Creditors are entitled to a satisfaction out of the money arising from the sale of it, they must submit to the Terms prescribed by the Deed, and the risk, if any, if imposes; and that the purchaser is not liable to the creditors for any misapplication of it, any more than he would have been responsible for the improper use of it by Mr Lawton, in case he had sold the estate before the executors of the Deed of Trust.

That if the usual Clause directing that the [Rect?] of the Trustees shall discharge the purchaser, will not indemnify him, it has been in vain employed by Conveyers; if it has no effect in such cases by inserting it, it becomes a trap. In case of scheduled Debts it is necessary, for where the Debts are not schedule and the purchaser has no notice, he may safely pay the purchase money into the hands of the Trustees, and submit it to their application.

That the annuity of £100 stated in the Deed of Trust to be granted by Mr Lawton to Mr Broomhead has been assigned to Mr Henry Tomkinson and Mr George Garnett, who regularly received it out of the Rents of Mr Lawtons’s settled Estates.

That the other Annuities of £50 and £100 granted to Mr Broomhead and Mr Biggs, and which have been transferred by them to Messrs Gagley and Baker, X appear to be secured only by Bonds and Judgments; and for the arrears[?] of those Annuities execution was some ago taken out against Mr Lawton’s person, and he is now in custody in the suit of these Annuitants.

X – This fact should be ascertained in the Trust Deed that are called Rent Charges.

 

 

20 August 1789.  Document relating to the purchase of the Montpelier Estate later called Linley Wood.

Draft Release of a Messuage and Tenement Lands and Heredits called Montpelier situate near Talk on the Hill in the County of Stafford.
in Concern of £670

[‘Make a fair copy of the Draft for perusal’ crossed out]

Copied T.T.

Messrs Bate and Yoxall Trustees for Sale of part of the Estate of John Lawton Esq and then John Lawton.

To [‘Mr John Beckett’ crossed out] Mr James Caldwell

Note,

Concerning purchase of Linley Wood, then called Montpelier and other lands of Mr John Lawton – and Messrs Charles and H-  and

Documents relating to further purchases in Alsager etc etc.

Tale

Mr James Caldwell having entered into a Contract with Messrs Bate and Yoxall, the Trustees named in the Deed of Trust, a Copy of which is left herewith, for purchase of the Estate therein mentioned Montpelier , an abstract of the Title was delivered upon the perusal of which the following opinions were given by the late Mr Beard.

Upon perusal of this Abstract, I see that the Deeds of Lease and Release of 24 and 25th March 1767 being the Conveyance from Rowley, Kent and Grandson and Heir at Law of Hugh Rowley and his Mortgages to William Bate from whom Mr Lawton purchased are wanting or are the Deeds of Lease and Release of 15th 16th October 1768 being the Mortgage from William Bate and his Trustees to Esther Myott, who afterwards intermarried with John Gallimore; neither does it appear from anything here stated that Mrs Lawton hat done any Act to be her Dower of the Estate intended to be purchased. The Articles of the 24th January 1770 must be produced to see whether any such Act has been done, if these objections are answered, I see nothing to prevent a good Title from being made to a purchaser. A copy of the Trust deed must be taken and a Covenant to produce it, and it would be desirable that Mrs Lawton should join in the Conveyance even if there appears no necessity for Mr Lawton’s concurrence.

William Beard, Newcastle Feb 20th 1788

It being doubtful whether Mr Lawton would join in a Conveyance of the estate, the following queries were afterwards put to Mr Beard.

In case copies should be procured of the Deeds of the 24th and 25th March 1767, the 15th and 16th October 1768 the Articles of the 24th January 1770, and a purchaser should be satisfied in respect to Mrs Lawton’ Dower may a conveyance be safely accepted from the Trustees alone without the concurrence of Mr Lawton?

I am of opinion it may, but I should if possible recommend Covenant from Bate or the Trustee to produce the above Deeds. If a Schedule of Debts is annexed to the Trust Deed, the purchaser should look to the application of his purchase money notwithstanding the Clause in the Deed that the receipt of the Trustee shall be a discharge to the purchaser. William Beard. Newcastle 16th June 1788

The purchaser being afterwards satisfied in respect to the Deed noticed in Mr Beard’s Opinion, proposed, in order to prevent [five?] “trouble, to give Mr Lawton 30 Guineas over and above the purchase money in case he and Mrs Lawton would join in the Conveyance and levy a fine; and to accept the Title, on having a Covenant from the Trustees (in whose hands the whole of Mr Lawton’s affairs were) to indemnify against Mr Lawton’s Creditors or any person claiming under the Trust Deed. Understanding this proposal to be approved of and acquiesced in by all parties, Mr Caldwell directed the Draft of the Conveyance left herewith, to be prepared, which, together with several letters that had passed in the course of the business, being laid before Mr Watson, he gave the Opinion following.


Reading as I have with much pleasure the letters of Mr Caldwell, an accomplished Gentleman (at least judging from the letters I am brought to think so) I should apprehend we may safely refer to his own candour and judgment the reasons hereafter offered against his requisitions. A Trustee having nothing but his labour for his pains, can’t in any degree of Justice be subjected to risqué or be made accountable for the actions or conduct of other men. If it were not so, who prudently would engage in such Trusts, however necessary for the accommodation of Society. Had Mr B been now living I should have had less reluctance in giving the Opinion following – think that the power given to the Trustees ( expressly exempting the purchaser from the application and consequences) to receive and apply the Trust money notwithstanding the Schedule of Debts (the Schedule in part being made for the information of the Trustees) is sufficient to enable them to discharge the purchaser and to render him unaccountable to the Creditors. I admit it is a general Rule that if the Debts are Scheduled, that the purchaser is to look to the application having notice of the Debts but otherwise as to unscheduled Debts. Not to obviate the mischief of the former this power was at first prepared by some ingenious conveyance of no very late period and has ever since been used by modern and more improved professions of the science. The difficulties and expenses attending the Application by the purchaser are to obvious to observe; but observe I must to prevent these difficulties and their expenses such Authorities are in a great measure (I know there are many more reasons for ‘em) given. By the Deed of Trust it is admitted all the Debts become a lien on the Estate, but if anterior to the Deed they were not so they can effect the Estate only on the terms and under the conditions of the Instrument itself, which directs that the Trustees shall discharge them by the money arising by the sale of the Trust Estates and directs the purchasers to pay it to them accordingly. I have not the Schedule before me and of course can’t judge of the quality of the Debt.

J Watson Lowe

20th March 1789

I have made an Observation in the margin which relates to Mr Caldwell

I flatter myself will give him no offence as an officious service. J.W.

N3. Mr Atherton will please to observe, that the Covenant from the Trustees to indemnify against the Creditors and – Deed was introduced into the Draft, merely in consequence of what Mr Caldwell understood to be the private agreement of the parties before mentioned, and not from any idea generally of Trustees entering into personal Covenants; which circumstance does not seem to have been explained to Mr Watson, the Trustees now – were only to enter into this Covenant, in case Mr Lawton would not join in the Conveyance.

 There being a contradiction between the opinions of Mr Beard and Mr Watson, particularly as to the liability of the purchaser to see to the application of his purchase money, a copy of the Trust Deed accompanied with the following queries, was sent up to town, and laid by a friend of the purchaser before Mr Holliday, who gave the Opinion also following.

You will please to advise the purchaser whether he may safely pay his purchase money to Messrs Bate and Yoxall and accept the Title under the Trust Deed; or whether, as there is a Schedule of Debts he is liable to see to the application of his purchase money, notwithstanding the Clause in the Deed directing that the receipt of the Trustees shall be a sufficient discharge; and whether in case the money be paid to the Trustees, they ought not to give the purchaser their own Covenant in his conveyance to indemnify him against the Creditors or any persons claiming under the Trust Deed.

The Case of Lloyd and Baldwin determined by Lord Hardwicke and reported in 1Veg 173 is an authority in point that Mr Lawton and his Trustees could not among themselves alter the – of the securities to the Creditors, and although it is said that the Trustees may sell the Montpelier Estate without the concurrence or direction of Mr Lawton, yet as there are not full Covenants or any Covenants for the Title to this Estate entered into, so as to run with the Lands, no purchaser will by any advice of mine compleat the purchase without Mr Lawton’s Grant, Release and Confirmation and proper Covenants in support of the Title.

A purchaser is bound to see to the Application of his purchase money in discharge of Scheduled Debts. Yet it does not follow that these were the first liens on the Estate, and in as much as the Lawton family appear on the face of the deed of Trust to have been greatly involved and to have executed many warrants of Attorney to confess judgments I cannot advise the purchaser to proceed further, unless he applies his money in discharge of the old Judgments and takes Assignments of such specialty debts as he shall discharge in the name of a Trustee in Trust to protect the inheritance from puisne or subsequent in ambro.

J. Holliday, Lincoln Inn. 28th April 1789

If this estate has been mortgaged the Mortgagee must of course be first paid.

J.H.

The Debts mentioned in the Schedule are Bond and simple contract only. There is no Mortgage upon Estate. Search has been made upon the Roll, from the date of Mr Lawton’s purchase Deed of the Montpelier Estate to that of the Trust Deed and the following Judgments appear to have been entered up against Mr Lawton viz., in the Kings Bench one in Hilary Term 1775 ads John Broomhead for £ 1200 Debt and 63d damages. Another in Trinity Term 1777 ads Henry Biggs for the like sum. Another in Michaelmas Term 1777ads Samuel Hooker but no sum specified and another in Trinity Term 1778 ads John Broomhead for £1200 debt and 63d damages. One in Exchequer ads Ralph Ratecliffe in p= for 1000l upon Bond and since satisfied by the Trustees. The former are Annuity Creditors only. And Mr Lawton, has been taken in Execution, and is now in prison at the suit of some or other of them.

The Trustees obtained a Warrant of Attorney in 1772 from Mr Lawton to confess Judgment [from?] them, which they entered up in 1777 for £--

The purchaser has been let into possession of the Estate, which he is now improving and -  unwilling to join in the Conveyance, and levy a fine, if the latter be necessary (vid p.2.of the Trusts Deeds)

Under these circumstances Mr Caldwell has proposed, that both the Title and Conveyance should be referred to Mr Atherton to be finally settled by him, and that all parties should be governed by his opinion and advice, to which the Trustees having assented, he will please to direct in what manner this Title ought to be made out, and a Conveyance accepted, after perusing the additional Tracts and Observations made by Messrs Bate and Yoxalland left herewith.

[different handwriting]

I am very much inclined to think the case of Lloyd and Baldwin is not appropriate to the present case, in that extensive sense in which Mr Beard and Mr Holliday have taken it for there it is to be observed, no mention is made of any such a Clause, as in the present Trust Deed, discharging purchasers form the obligation of seeing their purchase money properly applied, and of course, we have not, as I conceive, Lord Hardwicke’s sentiments of the effect of such a Clause in such a Deed with a Schedule of Debts to be discharged under the Trusts of it, annexed thereto. The case before him was that of a Decree which the subsequent transaction, deviating from the regular order of proceeding under it would have rendered of no effect; and therefore the decision in that case must appear to have been agreeable to the justice and equity of it; but as before observed, the Dictum or Doctrine of Lord Hardwicke to support it, is without any reference to such a Clause as I have been mentioning; so that I think the present may be distinguished from that case; and indeed I cannot suppose so many eminent men of the profession would have adopted a nullity, and which this case must be if Lloyd v Baldwin leans upon the question in the wayh above contended for. Consequently I must coincide with Mr Watson’s sentiment as to the operation and effect of this Clause; admitting at the same time (and which his opinion imports) that the purchaser’s indemnity to be derived from the Clause, extends only to such Debts, as were not of themselves a Lien upon the Estate antecedent to the Trust Deed. But perhaps it might have been unnecessary for me to give an opinion at all upon this point, as the additional facts and observations stated in a paper left herewith may possibly have rendered the above Clause useless, in relation to the purchaser of the premises in question. This there said “that as there are large sums now due  to the Trustees from Mr Lawton, they conceive themselves warranted to retain the purchasers money – the satisfaction of these debts.” Agreed, provided these Debts were owing at the time of the Trust Deed, or in consequence of the Trustees having out of their own money paid any of the Debts, the payment of which was provided for by the Trust Deed; for in the latter case, they would stand in the place of such Creditors, and most clearly would have right to retain to the amount of the debts they had so discharged: but this should not seem to be the case from the following statement in the papers above referred to “That the Purchase money being engaged to discharge the Debt contracted by the Trustees in consequence of their Engagement with Mr Lawton cannot be now applied in execution of the Debts scheduled upon the Deed of Trust.” Now if from this I am to understand that the purchase money is to be applied in discharging any of the Debt, then one of the Deeds [of description?] I have just mentioned, then the effect of the clause is discharged in relation to the present purchaser; for though this declaring the Trustees [Red ?] would secure him against this misapplication of his purchase money, supposing he had no Notice thereof, yet having notice (as he now has) I apprehend he would not be entitled to take advantage of such Clause, and consequently he could not be advised to pay his purchase money to the Trustees under these circumstances. If however, I have misconstrued the above statement in the paper left herewith, still I think this purchase cannot be completed with safety to the purchaser without first advertising to the particular circumstances of this case, and the previous knowledge of some facts, which I have not been able from the papers before me, to make myself perfect master of. It does not appear when Mr Lawton purchased the premises in question, and therefore the Rent charge of 100 granted to Mr Broomhead may possibly be general words he made chargeable thereon under recitals in Trust Deed Do.17;and consequently its having been uniformly paid out of the settled grant of the Estate does not preclude the necessity of Messrs Tomkinson and Garnett (to whom this Rent Charge is assigned) being made parties to the conveyance to Mr Caldwell. In the recital of the Trust Deed do: 8: the Annuity of £50 to Mr Broomhead and of £100 to Mr Bigg (and which have been assigned to Messrs Gagley and Baker) are called Rent Charges, therefore it should seem as if they were secured in some other way besides bond and judgment; and if so then Messrs Gagley and Baker should be made parties to the Conveyance; for though Mr Lawton is taken in execution upon the judgment, I apprehend the Annuitants would have a right to discharge for their Annuities or Rent Charges, upon the premises in question, supposing them to be granted thereout. After what I have said in the outset of this opinion with respect to the extent of the Clause declaring the Trustees [requirements?] &c I need not add that if there are any other judgment or other creditors whose debts were a lien upon the premises prior to the Trust Deed, they will be necessary parties to the conveyance i.e. so many of the first of them, who are unpaid, and when Debts will exhaust the present purchase money.

It is not usual in any case for Trustees to enter into any other Covenant that they have not any act to incumber; nor can they be expected or required to do more in the present case and especially as Mr Lawton is now to be a party to the conveyance.

I am not aware of any other conveyance having occurred in this case which it was incumbent on me to take notice of, but as what I have said may possibly under a different arrangement necessary for the purpose of completing this purchase, I have thought it better not to attempt to settle the [Deed?] of the Conveyance to Mr Caldwell, till the parties have agreed amongst themselves how the purchase money is to be applied, supposing I am right in my conjecture that the intention was not to have applied it in strict conformity to the Trust Deed. In consequence too of what I have said respecting – encumbrances, other parties may be requisite.

Henry Atherton

Line:

20th August 1789

 

 

 

 

25 November 1789.  Note regarding the Unitarian dissenters, rough handwriting.

This was occasioned by the general meeting of the Dissenters of this County relative to the Test Act. The resolution which you may have seen in the General Evening part were written by T. Aikins [Atkins?]

A Parody on the Anaereontic Song

Intended to have been sung at the Maids-head November 25, 1789

To the Angel of England who sat in high glee,

The sound Nonconformists addrest a petition

To beg he’d inspire Mother-church them to free

From the Tests that dishonour the holy religion.

My permission you have,

Was the answer he gave,

But such favours as these of the Saints you must crave

And I wish you success in attempting to yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak.

The news thro’ Empyreum incontinent flew

When old Peter pretended to give himself airs:

If these mortals are suffered their scheme to pursue

There can’t be a hierarchy left below stairs

Hark already I hear

With terrified ear

The Church is in danger! New Cromwells are near

For all the Dissenters are learning to yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak.

Thy creed, Athanasius, these men disavow;

And the thirty-nine articles read with a sneer.

The Episcopal bench will be tenantless now;

And the biforked mitre a fools-cap appear.

My spirit, no fear on’t,

Shall soon do its errand.

I’ll strait excommunicate Priestly, I warrant,

And trim his hot crew for thus daring to yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak.

The carrot-pate Andrew then said, “Pry thee cease,

Thou high-priest of the Saints, such vile vociferation.

Presbyterians in England ‘tis true you may tease.

But in Scotland you cannot deny them salvation,

There, over each head,

Is a covenant spread

And my sons from your bother no mischief shall dread

But at leisure proceed in contriving to yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak”

Next Patrick arose with his visible phiz

“By my shoul, brave St. Andrew, I’m all of your mind

St. George is a fool if he care for this Zuis,

My Test-act I gave long ago to the wind

Come St. George, be not jealous

Of these honest fellows

Low Churchmen are safer than those who are zealous

A bigoted Clergy’s unwilling to yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak.

My lads,” quoth St. George, “all the while I was young

St. Peter and I remain’d very good friends

Tis true we’d a quarrel two cent’ries agone

But by pleasing him now, I shall make him amends

When the Pope was in fashion,

I laught at the passion

Now that others dessert him, I yearn with compassion

And like him will oppose ev’ry sect, that would yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak.”


However, my friends let us join hand in hand

Preserve unanimity tol’rance and love;

‘Tis our to support what’s so happily plann’d;

Perseverance will win tho’ the great disapprove.

While thus we agree,

Our toast let it be;

May every fashion of Worship be free;

And Denominations all study to yoke

The palm of Religion with Liberty’s oak.”

 

 

 

 

1790  James Caldwell approx 30 years of age.

 

 

Note dated but before July 1791.  Letter to James Caldwell from his sister Ann.  She mentions her father and so the letter must be before he died in July 1791.


Mr Caldwell,
Newcastle.

I am unwilling to let Weaver go without giving you some little account of our strange bustling journey to Manchester. I told you on Sunday my Mother was not quite well and that we had some thoughts of staying here till Tuesday. On Monday she thought herself better and we all set off at nine o’clock. We got to Knutsford at two, and after we had sat there about half  an hour she was taken suddenly much worse, went to bed immediately and did not get up till nine the next morning. Again she was better, and again we proceeded on our journey. We got to Manchester to dinner, dined at the inn, and set off for Miss Meanly where we arrived at four and took our abode for the remainder of our stay. My Mother kept tolerable all the evening and I pleased myself with the hopes that her complaint was entirely gone off. In the morning I was determined to think her better, and formed several plans for our amusement while we stayed in M. I was not sooner got out with Nelly Meanly [Manly?] and Bessy, than I was called in again to attend to Mother who had been very indifferent all night and found herself unable to sit up at all. This you may be sure was a terrible stroke to me, but I was determined to call up all my reason and philosophy. After she was got to bed, and I had concluded she was going to have a very bad fever, I went and settled everything with Mrs Holland, that we might be ready to leave Manchester the next morning if my Mother was at all able to get up. About eight at night Mr Hassall came, and thought with me that it would be right to get home as fast as possible. Accordingly everything was [red wax seal in way] for our departure and if she was no worse we were to be in the [red wax seal on page] at two o’clock on Thursday afternoon. She had a good deal of sleep in the night and thought herself able to bear the journey. I cannot tell you how often we determined and undetermined about this important hazardous undertaking, everybody thought it was madness to go in the state my Mother was in, Mr Hassall was the only person that supported my scheme and as leaving a dozen people in consternation at our rashness, away we came about noon. Mr H came with us to Knutsford, drank a glass of wine and returned instantly to Manchester. My Mother bore her journey better than expectation, got a good night at Knutsford and the next morning at 9 we set off in good spirits for Nantwich. We came home to tea on Friday, and have continued mending ever since. She is but indifferent to day, but Mr Kent has ordered her the bath, and thinks the complaints she now has proceed entirely from the fatigue of her journey. It was hard upon poor Bessy to be left amongst a parcel of strangers when she was under such apprehensions on my mothers account. Mr H however, would bring her comfort from Knutsford and I wrote on Friday to tell her how much better we all were. I have not a doubt but she will be happy with Mrs H, she liked every body she saw, and seemed perfectly satisfied with the appearance of her situation. I shall see you soon, I think, at Newcastle. My father talks of going to London in a fortnight and I cannot then come to see Sally. My Mother and [mes?] join me in love to you. I am in a most violent hurry. Weaver will be gone to bed. You would wonder what was become of us all if I had not sent a line, but I believe you will find some difficulty to make out the meaning of my random espistle.

Every yours

A Caldwell

 

34-5915 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
No date. 1790ish?
Note from Mrs Elizabeth Caldwell to Mrs Wedgwood.  The note reads as follows:
Mrs Caldwell presents compliments to Mrs Wedgwood and is much obliged to her for the pig she was so kind to mention, and which Mr C has taken the liberty of sending for.  She will be happy to hear that Mrs Wedgwood is well and that the hooping cough has nearly quitted the family.  Mr Caldwell and Miss Stamford beg their compliments.
Linley Wood, Sunday Evening.

 

1790.  From the book "The Wood Family of Burslem" by Frank Faulkner, published 1912.  
Mr James Caldwell entered into partnership with Enoch Wood in 1790, taking, however, very little part in the technical management of the business, being a "sleeping or finance partner."  The name of the company was changed to "Wood & Caldwell".

 

Letter to James Caldwell from his sister Ann regarding the failing health of their father.  Probably dates to early 1791 as he died July 1791.

Mr Caldwell

Newcastle

Dear Brother,

When I wrote to you yesterday my father had just sent on a great hurry for Doctor C. and I had heard nothing said about it before; I am afraid I alarmed you as well as myself more than there was any occasion for. I had sat down to write to you and before I had made two letters, my mother came down in a violent agitation to tell Will he must go immediately to Chester. I was so frightened with hearing the message, that I wrote anything to you that came uppermost and there was not time to be particular as the bag was made up. I think I told you on Sunday my father’s complaint was a dizziness in his head. He was taken on Sunday morning. Mr Kent took a little blood from him, and he thought himself better till Tuesday night. After supper he was exceeding poorly in his head and so low he could scarcely speak. He got no sleep all that night and yesterday thought himself much worse. Mr Penlington told him he did not apprehend him in the least danger, but as he seemed alarmed about himself he had better send for Dr C. This was all concluded on while I went down to write to you and you may suppose I should be a good deal shocked to hear of a physician being sent for. He continued poorly till about five o’clock in the afternoon, but went better after drinking some tea. He had a very good night and is today a vast deal better. Dr [Curry?] came this morning to breakfast. He says [wax seal] not in the least danger, thinks his complaints are altogether nerves and has not a doubt but he will be quite well in a few days. I have been exceeding unhappy ever since my letter went. I know you will think my father worse than he really is. And as from what I said you might think it necessary to come over tomorrow. We determined to send Will early in the morning to prevent you, and to ease the anxiety you would be in. I can now assure you there is not the least reason to be alarmed. And if it is not convenient for you to come over tomorrow and stay with Mr Tomas, I would not have you think of it. We shall expect to see you on Saturday. And I would advise you not to let even business prevent you, for though I hope and believe there will not be the smallest occasion to come on my father’s account, yet I think he will be pleased to see you with Mr Tomas. It will be quite unnecessary for you to come before Saturday. I shall order Will to send this letter to you, lest you should be frightened to see him. Doctor Skerrett has been seeing his new sister today. He has been talking to my father about his complaints in terms too learned for us to understand. My mother and Bessy desire love, they are well. Will you overlook all the fault of these scrawls I am sending you every day; and impute them to the infirmities of your affectionate sister A Caldwell.

Be sure to give my love to Mrs W, and tell her she must not think of sending for Miss Willett a long time yet. My mother would have sent Will to you tonight. But I thought you might perhaps not get my letter than morning.

 

9 January 1791.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register
Baptism: Ann, daughter of Mr James Caldwell, born. 9 January.

 

15 June 1792.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.
Baptism: Margaret Emma, daughter of Mr James Caldwell.

 

28-20688 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
November 1792
Note as follows:
Messers E Wood & Co To Josiah Wedgwood
1791 Nov 25 To Interest of £2000 6 months £45
1792 Nov 25 To Interest of 4½ percent 12 months £90
£135

 

6 December 1792.  A bond of some sort was entered into where by Hannah Stamford (James Caldwell's wife's sister) loaned money to Enoch Wood, the elder.  Enoch Wood paid back to Hannah Stamford the sum of £3,111 and 11 shillings and 6 pence on 20 July 1821.  This appears to be shares of or a loan to the pottery company Wood & Caldwell.  See 28-20543 in the Wedgwood archive.

 

 

17 December 1792.  Copy of letter sent from Lieut Harrison to Thomas Ainsworth.

 Copy of a letter written and sent to Mr Thomas Ainsworth of Bolton, the 17th December 1792.  Lieut Harrison of Chorley.

Mr Ainsworth,

Sir,

I must beg leave to offer you my sentiments respecting the business Mr H-d-a was here upon, on Saturday last, for which I hope your excuse. It strikes me that every association ought to aim at the preservation of Peace, good order and universal good neighbourhood, and your association appears to be expressly for this purpose. How far then it is proper to interfere in other towns so as to cause a disagreeable division amongst the inhabitants, at present upon the most social agreeable footing, I leave it to your own judgement to determine. With me it appears in the most disagreeable point of view; and to think there may be the least possibility of any individuals being called upon in the characters of informers (a name detested by all respectable characters of any Party) is what must give the most disagreeable sensation to any man of sensibility. Also instead of conciliating differences in opinion; to proceed to any kind of individual prosecutions, is I think only tending to inflame: and in the present instance in my mind wholly unnecessary. There are few men but have particular political opinions, which it is impossible (nay, in some measure unjust) to deprive them off, so long as they do not interfere in any particular manner with the Constitution, and for any individual to suffer for a few inconsiderate words, spoken without any mischievous or bad intention, which (from the general tenor of the gentleman’s actions and known character both public and private) is generally believed would in my be very hard. It would also be a very great loss to the town to be without a Magistrate, and I do not believe we have another gentleman in the town who would accept the office.

Though the gentleman’s opinion and m—might differ with respect to the Form of Government we might fix upon, had we the formation of one; yet I must do him the justice to say, that I firmly believe we would never have the least idea, (and I absolutely think him incapable) of doing anything that he thought might affect the Peace and good order of Society. In fact, upon any occasion of disturbance, I am sure he would be one of the first to step forward to quell it by whatever party brought forward.

I sincerely hope all further thoughts upon this business may be dropp’d, as I am well convinced most of the Principal Inhabitants of this place are of the same opinion with me; and it would give me,  and I dare say them, much uneasiness to see any further steps taken.

I have only to add, that from the reasons stated, you will particularly oblige me, and I doubt not many of the Gentlemen of this place, if you will use your influence to stop any further procedures.

CH

Copy of a Declaration given to Mr Caldwell of Newcastle under-lym by Leit Harrison of Chorley, February 5th 1793.

“On the first of December last Abraham Crompton Junior Esq. who resides at Chorley in the County of Lancaster, being in the Coffee Room at Chorley, reading the papers, in company with Mr John Harrison, Mr James Smith, Mr Thomas Hindle, Mr William Hough, and Mr Herbert Edgar, all of whom are his neighbours and acquaintances, the subject of politics was started owing to some mention or other being made of Judge Ashurst’s Charge, when the conversation turning generally upon forms of Government, it was observed by somebody, that no moderate person could be for a Revolution; when Mr Comrpton said that he was for a revolution, upon which Mr Harrison observed, ‘That is a very undefined term, you would not mean by that to overset the present Constitution?’ Mr Crompton replied, ‘I would have no Lords.’ Mr Harrison then asked, ‘What! And would you have no King?’ Mr Crompton replied, ‘Yes, I would have no King; but if it was to be done it should be gradually, and when it appeared to be the general sense of the people to have it so.’ The conversation was here interrupted by the Mistress of the Coffee Room opening the door, and some other Gentlemen coming in, nothing more was said; but Mr Crompton afterwards declared to Mr Harrison that he wished to have explained himself further had he not been interrupted.

The foregoing is according to the best of my recollection the substance of what passed; but I considered and clearly understood it at the time as nothing more than mere matter of loose, private conversation on a general question of politics and government; and not at all as expressive on the part of Mr Crompton of anything personal or disrespectful to his present Majesty, or as conveying, or meant to convey that the idea of any wish or intention to disturb, weaken or reflect upon the existing Government.

I have known Mr Crompton for many years and have always considered him as a worthy respectable man and of unimpeachable character and conduct. Since he has been in the Commission of the Peace, he has uniformly acquitted himself, so far as I ever heard, or could judge, as an useful upright Magistrate, particularly vigilant and active in the discharge of his Office, and in enforcing the execution of and active submission to theLaws.

The letter, a copy of which is subjoined, and which was written by me on the 17th December to a Mr Thomas Ainsworth who is a friend of mine, and a Member of the Association established at Bolton for the Protection of Liberty and Property, will more fully explain my sentiments and impressions at the time, respecting this disagreeable and misrepresented business.

Signed

L H.

 

 

17 February 1793.  Letter to James Caldwell from Abraham Crompton junior.

Chorley Feb 17, 1793

Dear Sir,

I thank you very sincerely for your kind and friendly letter and for all your wishes and endeavours to serve me. With respect to the accusation against me for tearing down Judge Ashhurst’s Charge I have only to answer that it is totally unfounded laying my hand upon my heart and calling God to witness I solemnly declare that it was not my act and deed and that it was done without my knowledge, direction or consent on the contrary I was sorry to find it pulled down and expressed myself strongly to that purpose. A more unjust calumny could not possibly have been circulated. How wicked men can be when their hearts are bent on mischief. As to the other political outrages you mention I have not the most distant conception to what you refer and should be obliged to you to explain yourself more particularly. I have no doubt they will be found to have existed no where but in the black hearts of my malicious enemies, the number of whom I am sorry to find is greater than I had supposed. Do good Sir be kind enough to let me know what these outrages are. I mentioned your kind letter to Mr Harrison, one of the witnesses summoned against me who will take the liberty of troubling you with a line of explanation of the whole business as I wish to conceal nothing from you conscious to myself as I before said of no evil or seditious intention. With great respect I remain,

Your much obliged friend,

And humble servant

Abraham Crompton Junior. 

 

 

 

 

18 February 1793.  Letter to Sir Henry Houghton from ?

 

To Sir Henry Houghton Bart, M.P.

London

 

Chorley 18th February 1793

 

Sir, Mr Crompton having communicated to me a letter he received from you on Saturday last, I felt myself impelled to endeavour to clear him from some of these injurious charges laid against him. They, I trust from your known character, will be a sufficient apology for this intrusion. Judge Ashurst’s  most excellent charge had been put up in our Coffe Room, but that it was taken down by Mr Crompton, I may safely say, is absolutely false; which from the authority I have I am fully justified in doing; neither have I heard of any other instance of Political Outrage though I believe many injurious reports have been circulated, and very unjust aspersions cast upon him, in consequence of the very unfortunate (and as his friend I must say inconsiderate declaration of his Sentiments upon the different forms of Government.) and notwithstanding we may suppose a degree of impropriety looking upon him as a Magistrate; yet, if we consider him only as a private individual conversing upon any topic whatever in a mixed company, his arguments certainly ought not to be regarded further than any others of that Company so as to be censured particularly on account of his Magisterial capacity. And consequently in this point of view we may infer, the impropriety in a great measure as done away. That Mr Crompton has regarded himself in this light I have no doubt, as he has more than once declared to me, that when not absolutely acting as a Magistrate, he only considered himself as one of the Company he happened to be with, and consequently looked upon himself as having the same right to argue upon any subject and give his ideas at the moment with the same freedom as the rest. Yet in no other instance can I recollect the least impropriety or any circumstance tending to shew the least violence of Political Disposition.

As I think it necessary for Mr Crompton’s interest that you should be fully informed of the present unhappy circumstance exactly as it happened and as I am convinced it is Mr Crompton’s wish that I should give you this information. I will take the liberty to inclose a copy of a Declaration given and signed by me to Mr Caldwell (Mr Crompton’s Attorney) And also a copy of a letter written by me to a Gentleman at Bolton upon the occasion of an Attorney’s coming here with a view to obtain Affidavits upon the business. These will convey the best account, as also my impressions at the time, in as full a manner as I can give them.

I most sincerely hope your good and friendly Offices, (which I have no doubt will be executed in his favour) added to your interest with Lord Hawksbury, and a proper representation from you of the facts, may be attended with every success I wish, and that you will shortly be able to convey to Mr Crompton the [good?] news that this affair is entirely settled [hole in page] restore happiness to his family [hole in paper] Particularly Mr Crompton [hole]  in such an anxious uncertain moment as just given Mr Crompton, ad addition to his family the [hole] have felt severely, as well as Mr Crompton who notwithstanding every exertion to keep his spirits up, I am well convinced has suffered as much as from that uneasiness of mind naturally attended [hole] uncertainty, and the reflection of the pain [hole] his nearest and dearest relatives, through [hole] unthinking,  unfortunate moment.

I am sir, with greatest respect,

Your most – [hole

Jn.

 

 

 

Notes relating to James Caldwell defending his wife's cousin Abraham Crompton.
Abraham Crompton the younger of Chorley in theCounty of Lancaster Esq., maketh oath and saith that on the 1st day of December 1792 being the day on which his Majesty’s late proclamation ag” first appeared in London and therefore a considerable time before he this Deponent could have any knowledge, information that Chorley aforesaid being distant from London 200 miles upwards so this Deponent being in the Coffee chamber at Chorley aforesaid in company with Mssrs James Smith Gent., John Harrison, Cotton manufacturer, Mr [illegible] surgeon, Mr Hough Attorney at Law [Mr Berk?] Edgar, Liquor Merchant all of whom are this Deponents neighbours and acquaintances were the only persons in the room, the subject of politics and the nature and [menk?] of different forms of Government being started, he this Deponent, on its being observed by the said James Smith that no person of property could be for a Revolution was led in the course of argument and conversation inadvertently to say he was for a Revolution and on being asked by the said John Harrison whether he would have no Lords to reply that he would have no Lords and on being asked by the said John Harrison whether he would have no King hastily and unthinkingly to answer them he would have no King or the said Deponent used expressions to that effect. But this Deponent positively saith that he did not use such expressions with any wish or design whatever to excite the persons to whom he addressed the same to attempt or undertake any matter or thing for the subversion or disturbance of the present constitution nor did he mean thereby to show any slight or contempt upon his Majesty’s person or government but that the same were upon the subject of and in answer to the observation so made by the said James Smith and the questions so asked by the said John Harrison as [ap?] in which way alone he the Deponent having inferred it would that he was understood by all the parties present. And this Deponent further said that though he might in the cause of argument express such opinions “a proposit” as aforesaid yet that he this Deponent is not the less aware that many things abstractedly and theoretically considered may appear to be maintainable and right are in practice inexpedient, dangerous and this Deponent further saith that it was his wish and intention to have explained himself further upon the subject so as to have precluded any misconstruction or mistake had he not been prevented by the Mistress of the house and some other persons coming into the room whom this Deponent did not think it proper to resume the topic. And this Deponent further saith that some time after such conversation had been so held by this Deponent as aforesaid namely on the 19th of the same [month?] of December at about 10 or 11 o’clock at night he this Deponent was informed by the said Mr Harrison that he the said Mr Harrison together with the said Mr Smith and Mr Hough had been served with summons from the Rev Dr Master the Rev Thomas Baldwin two of his majesty’s [Justices of the Peace?] for the County of Lancaster to appear before them for the purposes therein mentioned and a copy of which summons and directed to the said John Harrison is hereto annexed * which summons as this Deponent was informed and understood had been issued with a view to an inquiry into the conduct of this Deponent and the conversation so held by him as aforesaid and this Deponent further saith that he this Deponent together with the said witnesses being much surprised by such proceedings as aforesaid and it being doubted whether the said witnesses were under any obligation to give their evidence under such circumstances as aforesaid but all the said [fates?] expressed their wish so to do what was most proper on the occasion it was proposed and agreed to have the assistance and advice of Counsel   

[Crossed out – Deponent further saith that Thomas Cooper Esq., Barrister at Law who resides at about 12 miles distant from Chorley aforesaid being mentioned  - with whom this Deponent had not any particular acquaintance he this Deponent expressed his wish that some other Counsel should be applied and if possible one who had not been much engaged in political controversies – with the said Mr Cooper -  - commissioned at 2 public turnpike road meetings which the said Mr Cooper also attended as commissioners]

And this Deponent further saith that it was thereupon proposed to send for John Adderson Esq., Barrister at Law who resides at [P-?] in the said County of Lancaster and who being approved of by all the said [masters?] was set for and attended at Chorley accordingly and this Deponent saith that the said Mr Cooper [crossed out] Barrister at Law did also attend as Counsel with the said Mr Addison at Chorley aforesaid owing to an application having been made to him as the Deponent was afterwards informed and [retained?] at the insistence of a friend of this Deponent who resides at Bolton which is near to Mr Cooper’s place of residence and to whom this Deponent had sent in consequence of the summonses which had been so issued [next page – crossed out] as aforesaid, but this Deponent saith that such application to the said Mr Cooper as aforesaid – [crossed out]

And this Deponent further saith that he hath been informed and [assured?] that the said Counsel did object to the witnesses being examined upon oath by the said magistrate unless they the Counsel were permitted to be present at such examine which being refused this Deponent has been informed and [?] that [illegible] this Deponent further saith in direct contradiction to what he understands has been most falsely imputed to him that this Deponent did not pull down or cause to be pulled down Judge Ashhursts Charge which had been stuck up in the Coffee Room at Chorley aforesaid but that on the contrary he this Deponent being informed that the same had been pulled down by some person did express his disapprobation thereof and his wish to have the same put up again [crossed out – this Deponent saith that he this Deponent did directly and immediately circulate and distribute  the pamphlet [more lines edited and crossed out]

Saith that so far from entertaining or having ever entertained any such design to subvert the present Constitution or disturb the government, he this Deponent should in perfect conformity to the real principles and opinions exert his utmost endeavour to prevent and defeat any attempt at the King and that he this Deponent hath on all occasions since he had been a magistrate for the County of Lancaster diligently and faithfully according to the best of the this Deponent’s knowledge and abilities enforced the Execution of and a due [submission?] to the Laws. And this Deponent further saith that from the sentiments which he this Deponent has been informed and understands that the gentlemen present at such conversation as aforesaid have concurrently expressed concerning the same as well as of this Deponent’s character and conduct both public and private this Deponent is unable to judge with whom and in what manner the Depending prosecution has originated unless that from the circumstances of this Deponent being a [protestant?] and the present ferment and animosity of the public mind in the neighbourhood where this Deponent resides against such Dissenters advantage may have been wished and attempted to be taken of him in consequence of some mention or other having been made of such conversation as aforesaid and some misapprehension thereof and which supposition he this Deponent is the more led to entertain from his having received on the very morning of such meeting of the Magistrates at Chorley as aforesaid a printed copy addressed to him this Deponent of a [Vailent, violent?] and scurrilous paper entitled ‘A Character of a Presbyterian & Justice’ and highly reflective upon the said with the most violent invective and abuse [ascribed to?] the character of the Protestant Dissenters of the Presbyterian Denomination  [crossed out – a copy of which can be produced].

 

Caldwell [copy of summons in two different handwritings.] relating to Abraham Crompton.

St. Hilary Term, 33rd George 1793

Lancashire, to wit Be it Remembered that Sir Archibald MacDonald, Knight Attorney General of Law present Sovereign Lord the King who for our present Sovereign Lord the King in this behalf prosecuteth in his own proper person comes here into the Court of our said Lord the King before the King himself at Westminster on Wednesday next after the Octavo of Saint Hilary in this same Term and for our said Lord and King giveth the Court here to understand and be informed that Abraham Crompton, late of Chorley in the County of Lancashire Esquire being a wicked seditious and ill disposed person and having no regard for the Laws of this Realm and most unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously and seditiously devising, contriving and intending to disturb the Peace and tranquility of our land, the King and of this Kingdom and to bring our Sovereign Lord the King and the Peers of this Realm and the Constitution and Government of this Kingdom as by Law established into hatred and contempt with the subjects of this Realm, and to asperse and vilify our said Lord and King and the Peers of this Realm and to alienate and withdraw the affections and fidelity of his said Majesty’s subjects from his said Majesty’s person and government on ye 1st day of December in ye 33rd year of the Reign of our present Sovereign Lord the King at Chorley aforesaid in the in the County of Lancashire in order to compleat perfect and bring to effect his most wicked and seditious contrivance and intentions aforesaid in the presence and hearing of diverse subjects of our Sovereign Lord the King  [ 3 words] wickedly, maliciously and seditiously did say, utter and publish of and concerning the Constitution and government of this Kingdom the scandalous and seditious words following, to wit, meaning himself the said Abraham, and for a Revolution meaning a Revolution in the Constitution and Government of this Kingdom and Imeaning himself the said Abraham would have no King or Lords meaning thereby that he would have no King or Lords meaning thereby that he would have no King or Peers of this Realm in the Constitution and Government thereof. In contempt of our Sovereign Lord the King and the Laws of this Kingdom to the great danger of our present happy constitution to the evil and pernicious example of all they in the like case affording and against the peace of our said present Sovereign Lord and King, his Crown and dignity. And aforesaid Attorney General of our said Lord and King for our said Lord the King with the Court here [furn?] to understand and be informed that the said Abraham Crompton being such a person as aforesaid and again unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously and seditiously devising, contriving and intending as aforesaid afterwards, to wit, on aforesaid 1st day of December in the aforesaid 33rd year of the reign of our said Sovereign Lord and King with force and arms at Chorley aforesaid in the County aforesaid in order to compleat, perfect and bring to affect his most his most wicked and seditious contrivances and intentions aforesaid in the presence and hearing of [diverse?] subjects of our Sovereign Lord and King unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously and seditiously did say, utter and publish of and concerning the constitution and Government of this Kingdom the scandalous and seditious words following, to wit, [Imeaning?] himself the aforesaid Abraham for a revolution, no King, no Lords meaning a revolution in the aforesaid constitution and government of this Kingdom and that there should be no King, or Peers of this Realm in the Constitution and Government thereof in contempt of our Sovereign Lord the King and the Laws of this Kingdom to the great danger of our happy constitution, to the evil and pernicious example of all those in the like case affording and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his Crown and dignity where upon the said Attorney General of our said Lord the King who for our said Lord the King in the behalf prosecuteth for our said Lord the King prayoth this consideration of the court here in the premises and that due process of Law may be accorded against him the aforesaid Abraham Crompton in this behalf to make him answer to our said Lord and King touching and concerning these [Premds?] aforesaid?     

 

 

 

About two months ago Abraham Crompton Junior Esquire who resides at Chorley in the County of Lancaster being in the Coffee Room at Chorley reading the papers with company with John Harrison, Mr James Smith, Mr Thomas Hindle, Mr William Hough and Mr Herbert Edgar, all of whom are his neighbours and acquaintances the subject of politics was started, owing to some mention or other being made of Judge Ashhurst’s Charges; wherein the conversation turning generally upon forms of Government it was observed by somebody present that no moderate person could before a Revolution when Mr Crompton said that he was for a Revolution upon which Mr Harrison observed, ‘That is a very undefined term, you would not mean by that to overset the present Constitution.’ Mr Crompton relied ‘I would have no Lords.’ Mr Harrison then said, ‘What, and would you have no King?’ Mr Crompton replied ‘Yes,I would have no King.’ Mr Hough then said ‘Republicanism (or a Republican Government) would never do for this Country.’ On which Mr Harrison observed that is could not, it had been tried. The conversation was here interrupted by the Mistress of the Coffee Room opening the door, and other gentlemen coming in nothing further was said; but Mr Crompton afterwards declared to Mr Smith that he wished to have explained himself further had he not bee interrupted.

The foregoing is as much as I recollect of what was said, though I cannot speak positively to it.

But I considered, and clearly understood at the time, to be nothing more than mere matter of lose, private conversation, on a general question of politics and Government, and not at all as expressive on the part of Mr Crompton, of any thing personal or disrespectful to his present Majesty, or as conveying, or meant to convey, the idea of any wish or intention to distress or reflect upon the existing Government.

I have know Mr Crompton for many years and have always considered him as a very worthy respectable man and of unimpeachable character and conduct since he has been in the Commission of the Peace, he has uniformly acquitted himself, so far as I ever heard or could judge, as an useful upright Magistrate, particularly vigilant and active, in enforcing the execution of, and a due submission to the Laws. In respect to politics I have always thought him moderate. When I have dined at his house, it was always his custom to give the King as his first Toast; and in case of any Riot or disturbance, I believe that he would be one of the first to step forwards to quell it, in whatever party or form whatever cause it might originate.

Witness

James Smith

James Caldwell

Signed at Chorley by Mr Smith

4th February 1793

On the first of December last, Abraham Crompton Junior Esquire, who resides at Chorley in the County of Lancaster being in the Coffee room at Chorley reading the papers in company with Mr John Harrison, Mr James Smith, Mr Thomas Hindle, Mr William Hough and Mr Herbert Edgar, all of whom are his neighbours and acquaintances, the subject of politics was started, owing to some mention or other being made of Judge Ashursts Charge when the conversation turning generally upon forms of Government it was observed by somebody that no moderate person could be for a revolution, when Mr Crompton said that he was for a Revolution, upon which Mr Harrison observed that is a very undefined term, you would not mean by that to overset the present constitution. Mr Crompton replied I would have no Lords. Mr Harrison then asked, what and would you have no King? Mr Crompton replied yes, I would have no King, but if it was to be done it should be gradually and when it appeared to be the general sense of the people to have it so. The conversation was now interrupted by the Mistress of the Coffee Room opening the door and some more Gentlemen coming in. Nothing more was said but Mr Crompton afterwards declared to Mr Harrison that we wished to have explained himself further had he not been interrupted.

The foregoing is according to the best of my recollection the substance of what passed but I considered and clearly understood it at the time as nothing more than mere matter of loose private conversation, on a general question of politics and Government, and not at all as expressed on the part of Mr Crompton of any thing said or disrespectful to his present Majesty or an conveying or meant to convey the idea of any wish or intention to disturb, weaken or reflect upon the existing Government.

I have known Mr Crompton for many years and have always considered him as a worthy respectable man of unimpeachable character and conduct. Since he has been in the Commission of the peace he has uniformly acquitted himself, so far as I ever heard, or could judge as an useful, upright magistrate particularly vigilant active in the discharge of his office, and in enforcing the execution of and a due submission to the Laws.

The letter a copy of which is subjoined and which was written by me on the Seventeenth December to a Mr Thomas Ainsworth who is a friend of mine and a Member of the Association established at Bolton for the protection of liberty and property, will more fully explain my sentiments and impressions at the time respecting this disagreeable and misrepresented business.

John Harrison

Signed in the presence of James Caldwell

Chorley

4th February 1792

Mr Ainsworth,

Sir,

I must beg leave to offer you my sentiments respecting the businesss, Mr Hardman was here upon, on Saturday last, for which I hope your excuse. It strikes me that every association might to aim at the preservation of peace, good order and universal good neighbourhood And your association appears to be expressly to this purpose. How far then it is proper to interfere in other towns so as to cause a disagreeable division amongst the inhabitants at present upon the most social agreeable footing; I leave it to your own Judgment to determine, with me it appears in the most disagreeable point of view and to think there may be the least possibility of any individuals being called upon in the character of informers (a name detested by all respectable characters of any party) is what must give the most disagreeable sensations to any man of sensibility. Also instead of conciliation differences in opinion to proceed to any kind of individual prosecutions is, I think, only leading to inflame and in the present instance in my mind wholly unnecessary. There are few men but have particular political opinions – impossible, nay in measure unjust to deprive them of so long as they do not interfere in any particular manner with the constitution. And for any individual to suffer for a few inconsiderate words spoken without any mischievous or bad intention which (from the general tone of the Gentleman’s actions and known character both public and private) is generally believed would in my mind be very hard.

It would also be a very great loss to the town to be without a Magistrate and I do not believe we have another Gentleman in the town who would accept the office.

Though the Gentleman’s opinion and mine might differ with respect to the form of Government we might fix upon, had we the Formation of one, yet I must do him the justice to say that I firmly believe he would never have the least idea (and I absolutely think him incapable) of doing any thing that he thought might effect the peace and good order of society. In fact upon any occasion of disturbance I am sure he would be one of the first to step forward to quell it by what ever party brought forward.

I sincerely hope all further thoughts upon this business may be dropp’d, as I am well convinced most of the Principal Inhabitants of this place are of the same opinion with me; and it would give me, and I dare say them, much uneasiness to see any further steps taken.

I have only to add, that from the reasons stated, you will particularly oblige me, and I doubt not many of the Gentlemen of this place, if you will use your influence to stop any further procedures.

Mr H begs to unite &c &c &c

Jn Harrison

December 17 1792

On 1st December 1792, Abraham Crompton Junior Esquire, who resides at Chorley in the County of Lancaster being in the Coffee room at Chorley reading the papers in company with Mr John Harrison, Mr James Smith, Mr Thomas Hindle, Mr William Hough and Mr Herbert Edgar, all of whom are his neighbours and acquaintances, the subject of politics was started, when Mr Edgar observed he was for moderate reform, when Mr Crompton said he was for a Revolution, upon which Mr Harrison observed that is a very undefined term, you would not mean by that to overset the present constitution. Mr Crompton replied I would have no Lords. Mr Harrison then said, what and would have no King? Mr Crompton replied ‘I would have no King.’ Mr Hough waited for some person to reply and then said ‘Englishmen will never – governed by a Republican Government.’ Mr Harrison observed ‘that system has been tried but it would not do.’  The conversation was here interrupted by the Mistress of the Coffee Room opening the door and other Gentlemen coming in, nothing further was said.

I considered and clearly understood what Mr Crompton said at the time to be nothing more than mere matter of loose private, inadvertent and unguarded conversation on a  general question of politics and Government, and not at all as expressive on the part of Mr Crompton of any thing personal or disrespectful to his present Majesty or as conveying or meant to convey the idea of any wish or intention to disturb, weaken or reflect upon the existing Government.

I have known Mr Crompton for many years and have always considered him as a worthy respectable man of unimpeachable character and conduct, and have had occasion often to go before him in his capacity of a Magistrate when he was vigilant and active in enforcing the execution of and a due submission to the Laws.

In respect to Politics I have always thought him moderate and have often asked Mr Smith his sentiment of Mr Crompton’s principles when Mr Smith uniformly told me he was for no more than for a moderate reform which every good subject could wish for. That at the News Room dinner which was on Thursday following the above conversation he gave the King for his Toast and I am confident in case of any Riot or Disturbance he would be one of the first to step forward and exert himself to quell it, in whatever party or upon whatever cause it might originate.

Chorley 4th Feb 1793.

William Hough

About two months ago Abraham Crompton Junior Esquire, who resides at Chorley in the County of Lancaster being in the Coffee room at Chorley reading the papers in company with Mr John Harrison, Mr James Smith, Mr Thomas Hindle, Mr William Hough and Mr Herbert Edgar, all of whom are his neighbours and acquaintances, the subject of politics was started and a general conversation took place upon the forms of Government in the course of which a Reform in this Country was mentioned when Mr Crompton said he thought there must be a Revolution or something to that effect, on which Mr Harrison observed ‘Why then Mr Crompton, you would have no King and no Lords,’ to which Mr Crompton replied Yes, but immediately added that he would not have a Revolution take place till every body was agreeable to it, and it could done without rioting and mobbing or used expressions to that effect. The conversation here interrupted by some persons coming into the room.

That is all that I particularly recollect of what passed, but I considered and clearly understood it at the time mere matter of loose private conversation and not at all personal to his present Majesty as conveying or meant to convey the idea of any wish or intention on the part of Mr Crompton to disturb, weaken or cast any reflections upon the existing Government.

I have known Mr Crompton for many years and have always considered him as a worthy and respectable man, and of unimpeachable character and conduct. Since the present questions of Politics have been agitate I have frequently heard his Moderation taken notice of by persons of what is called the opposition party, and during the time he has been in the Commission of the peace he has always acquitted himself, so far as I ever heard, or could judge as an useful, upright magistrate particularly vigilant active in the discharge of his office, and in enforcing the execution of and a due submission to the Laws. In case of any riot or disturbance I am persuaded that he would be one of the most forward in endeavoring to quell it, in whatever party or from whatever case it might originate

Thomas Hindle

Witness, James Caldwell

Signed by Mr Hindle at Chorley

4th February 1793

About two months ago Abraham Crompton Junior Esquire, who resides at Chorley in the County of Lancaster being in the Coffee room at Chorley reading the papers in company with Mr John Harrison, Mr James Smith, Mr Thomas Hindle, Mr William Hough and Mr Herbert Edgar, all of whom are his neighbours and acquaintances, a conversation on general politics took place arising from some mention or other being made of Judge Ashhurst’s Charge in the course of which something was said of King and Lords, when Mr Crompton observed that if he had a new Governemt to form he would have no King or Lords. Mr Edgar then observed that he was for reform to which Mr Crompton replied these are my sentiments, or that is my wish but I could have no robbing or rioting and if ever anything is done, it should be with the general consent of the people or the voiceof the Nation or that that effect.

The foregoing is all that I particularly recollect of what passed, but I considered and clearly understood it at the time mere matter of loose inadvertent conversation and not at all expressive on the part of Mr Crompton of anything personal or disrespectful to the King or as conveying or meant to convey the idea of any wish or intention disturb reflect upon the present Government.

I have known Mr Crompton for many years and have always considered him as a worthy and respectable man of unimpeachable character and conduct since he has been in the Commission of the peace he has uniformly acquitted himself, so far as I ever heard, or could judge as an useful, upright magistrate particularly vigilant active in enforcing the execution of and a due submission to the Laws. I have in some cases thought him rather too exact and in a matter of Revenue, leaning too much to the side of the King. I think no other Magistrate in this neighbourhood has taken the same pains in the discharge of his duty. I am confident that in case of any riot or disturbance Mr Crompton would be one of the foremost to quell it, in whatever party, or from whatever case it might originate.

Chorley 4th of February 1793

Herbert Edgar

In  confirmation of what is said by all the Gentlemen respecting Mr Crompton’s General character and conduct, the following copy of and letter from R Andrews Esq a Magistrate for the County of Lancaster with whom Mr Crompton has been in the habit of acting ever since he has himself been in the Commission of the Peace is added.

Rivington near Chorley.1793

Lancashire.

Mr Crompton of Chorley is a Gentleman of established good character in this neighbourhood and a firm friend to peace and good order. I have acted with him as a Magistrate some years and have ever found that he paid due attention and fidelity in executing the Laws of this Country to the best of his knowledge. He is a steady friend to the present form of Government and convinced I am that he would at this time be as ready as any person to put a stop to any Tumult or Insurrection that might arise.

R. Andrews.

February 21st

Observation

From a desire to do away with effects of that misrepresentation to which Mr Crompton finds himself expressed, as well as to present his being injured without cause in the esteem of those, whose good opinion it is his anxious wish to preserve, he has been induced to procure the foregoing Statements in order that the whole of this affair in which they relate, may be clearly and thoroughly understood. This he persuades himself is all that is requisite to his compleat vindication. But although satisfied of having committed no intentional offence and trusting therefore that he might with confidence look forwards to the determination of a Jury, Mr Crompton is still desirous to avoid be every honorable means, the being involved in a contention with Government.

It is unfortunate that the Gentlemen do not so fully and accurately recollect the general scope of the conversation as to convey more clearly the true import of Mr Crompton’s words, all that in point of substance he [affies?] did, or meant to say, amounted to nothing more than the expression of a bare opinion, resting wholly upon an Hypothesis namely, that if a Government was to be made anew then that it might be constructed in a better form than the present. Had not Mr Crompton been interrupted at the critical part of the conversation, by other persons coming into the room, there can be little doubt from the wish which he afterwards expressed to have had an opportunity of explaining himself further, and that he would have done it in such a manner as to have precluded the possibility of misconstruction or mistakes. So far indeed from entertaining any wish or intention to disturb the peace and order of Society Mr Crompton has no hesitation in declaring in the most explicit manner that he deprecates any attempt of the kind, and that if any such was made he should feel it to be his inclination no less than it would become his Duty, to use his utmost endeavours to resist and defeat it; being fully aware that what may in many cases appear to be abstractedly and theoretically right may in practice be highly inexpedient and unwise.

Any further or more particular observations may perhaps be deemed unnecessary, and take up too much time. It is only therefore submitted that from the – general tenor of the evidence it appears.

First, that the words spoken, were matter of private undesigning conversation only, in the course of a genuine argument between persons living in the same place, long known to each other, and amongst whom guarded and cautious language was deemed wholly unnecessary.

2nd. That these words were not used by Mr Crompton as part of any speech or declaration deliberately made or introduced by him with a view to excite or enflame the minds of the persons to whom he was speaking; but merely in hasty reply, to strong and leading questions, pointedly put, and were extorted therefore in some measure by the course of argument.

Thirdly. That from the concurrent Testimony of all the witnesses it is manifest that nothing of an inflammatory or seditious nature appeared to be intended on the one side, nor was understood on the other, and that so far from any contempt or disrespect to the present King and Government appearing to have been expressed nothing of the kind was even thought of by any of the parties at the time.

 

 

 

 

1793? Letter from Abraham Crompton to Mr White.  Not dated.

Mr Crompton presents his respectful compliments to Mr White and incloses a statement of his case together with a letter to the Attorney General which [‘he’ crossed out] of appended by him will make[?] himself still further obliged to Mr White to deliver [informally, conformably?] whilst he was so kind as to propose this morning?.

Mr Crompton begs leave to take this opportunity of expressing the high [enn?] he [entertains?] of the [‘Candor’ crossed out] liberality and polite attention which he has already experienced from Mr White on this disagreeable occasion.

[Rainbow?] Coffee House

King Street,

Covent Garden

Letters Ens

 

 

 

 

23 January 1793.  Note from the court regarding Abraham Crompton.

I, George the third by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, King, defender of the Faith to Abraham Crompton esquire, greeting and command you –ly injoining you that laying aside all excuses and pretences whatsoever you personally be and appear before us at Westminster on Tuesday next after the Octave of the purification of the [blessed?] Virgin Mary to answer to us touching and concerning those things which shall then and there be objected against you on our behalf and further to do and receive all and singular such Mallais and things as our Court shall then and there consider of concerning you in this behalf and this you are not to omit under the penalty of One hundred pounds to be paid on your goods and chattels, lands and tenements if you shall fail – witness – Lord King at Westminster the twenty third day of January in the thirty third year of our Reign,

By the Court

Templer

Sir Archibald Macdonald Knight, Attorney General of our Lord the King for our said Lord the King prosecuteth this Writ against the within named defendant upon an information [attributed by?] – him by the said Attorney General in the Court of our said Lord the King before the King himself for certain trespasses contempts and  misdemeanors whereof he is [impeached?].

 

 

 

 

Part of letter re Crompton case. 1793

Lord Hawkesbury present his compliments to Sir Henry Houghton and returns him the inclosed papers. It belongs to His Majesty’s Law Officers to judge, from the information they have received whether Mr Crompton ought to be prosecuted and in what manner; And it will be the duty of the Court and Jury before whom Mr Crompton is tried, to determine whether he is guilty, and to what Punishment he should be made subject; But Lord Houghton thinks it his duty as Chancellor of the County Palatine of Lancaster to say that if the conversation stated in Mr Harrison’s Declaration of the 4th February to have been held by Mr Crompton, shall be legally proved to have been actually held by him Mr Crompton (whatever his Character in other respects may be) is certainly unfit to exercise any Office of Magistrate under the Government of Great Britain according to the present Constitution.

Hertford Street

March 4 1793

 

 

 

16 March 1793. Draft note from Abraham Crompton.

[‘Immediately on being informed’ crossed out] In urgency of the Prosecution which has been commenced against me [‘in consequence of’ crossed out]  for some expression that I unguardedly made use of at Chorley I thought it my duty to wait upon Messrs Chamberlayne  - of [abtaining?] to them whatever may have been[advanced?] against me and of satisfying them that I intended no offence or disrespect to Government. Mr White having with equal candour and politeness attended to my representation I am induced to take the liberty of requesting [‘with the greatest deference’ crossed out] the favour of your perusal at the statement I have now the honor to enclose [being according to the best of my recollection a just account of the whole affair] at the same time of expressing my hope that any thing that I may have improperly said will be attributed to its true and inadvertence only what to my best intentions or design whatever. Under these circumstances should it be thought proper to [‘proceed no further in the present’ and ‘drop any further’ crossed out] drop any further Prosecution. I beg leave to add that [- ] to any thing that may be required on my part, consistent with my Honor and my feelings as a Gentleman. I have the honor to be sir,

Your most Obedient and humble Servant

Abraham Crompton

King Street

Covent Garden

16th March 1793

 

 

 

 

Letter to Mr Caldwell

Solicitor

Newcastle under Lyme

Staffordshire.

The King v Crompton

Sir,

Mr Attorney Fould[?] has not yet come to any determination relative to this prosecution, this moment he has been assured I will acquaint you the Rules to [pleed?] are unnecessarily given in order that we may, in case it shall eventually be found expedient, be entitled to proceed to Tryal at this Sessions Assizes or have a Judgment by default. I am sire your most humble servant.

Jos White

No. 6 Lincoln Inn

29 [March?] 1793

 

 

 

 

Letter to James Caldwell from Abraham Crompton Jun. Very find script handwriting.

Chorley 9th May 1793

Dear Sir,

I was surprised to receive you letter this morning. I was over at Bolton on Sunday and as Miss Noble was writing to H. Stamford I got her to mention that I should let Judgment go by default which is the determination we have come to. I wish you would send me an account of what money you paid in London and likewise a copy of the Memorial and other proceedings which we had when together. I cannot add anything more but Mrs C and my love to you.

AC jun. [Abraham Crompton Junior]

 

 

 

28-20689 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
1793
Bill mentioning James Caldwell, E Wood and Sparrow & Caldwell, 1792-1793 £504:19:8

 

34-5914 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
16 June 1793
Note from James Caldwell to Mr Pierpoint, Etruria, regarding an outstanding amount of £4:9:0 for oats sown and ploughing, owing to Humphrey Ratcliffe, who was the tenant of the Stoke Lane Estate, recently purchased by Mr Wedgwood.

 

2 November 1793.  Josiah Wedgwood writes his last will and appoints his son John Wedgwood joint executor with James Caldwell.

 

 

1 December 1793.  Copy of summons in two different handwritings.  Relates to Abraham Crompton.

Caldwell

St. Hilary Term, 33rd George 1793

Lancashire, to wit Be it Remembered that Sir Archibald MacDonald, Knight Attorney General of Law present Sovereign Lord the King who for our present Sovereign Lord the King in this behalf prosecuteth in his own proper person comes here into the Court of our said Lord the King before the King himself at Westminster on Wednesday next after the Octavo of Saint Hilary in this same Term and for our said Lord and King giveth the Court here to understand and be informed that Abraham Crompton, late of Chorley in the County of Lancashire Esquire being a wicked seditious and ill disposed person and having no regard for the Laws of this Realm and most unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously and seditiously devising, contriving and intending to disturb the Peace and tranquility of our land, the King and of this Kingdom and to bring our Sovereign Lord the King and the Peers of this Realm and the Constitution and Government of this Kingdom as by Law established into hatred and contempt with the subjects of this Realm, and to asperse and vilify our said Lord and King and the Peers of this Realm and to alienate and withdraw the affections and fidelity of his said Majesty’s subjects from his said Majesty’s person and government on ye 1st day of December in ye 33rd year of the Reign of our present Sovereign Lord the King at Chorley aforesaid in the in the County of Lancashire in order to compleat perfect and bring to effect his most wicked and seditious contrivance and intentions aforesaid in the presence and hearing of diverse subjects of our Sovereign Lord the King  [ 3 words] wickedly, maliciously and seditiously did say, utter and publish of and concerning the Constitution and government of this Kingdom the scandalous and seditious words following, to wit, meaning himself the said Abraham, and for a Revolution meaning a Revolution in the Constitution and Government of this Kingdom and meaning himself the said Abraham would have no King or Lords meaning thereby that he would have no King or Lords meaning thereby that he would have no King or Peers of this Realm in the Constitution and Government thereof. In contempt of our Sovereign Lord the King and the Laws of this Kingdom to the great danger of our present happy constitution to the evil and pernicious example of all they in the like case affording and against the peace of our said present Sovereign Lord and King, his Crown and dignity. And aforesaid Attorney General of our said Lord and King for our said Lord the King with the Court here [furn?] to understand and be informed that the said Abraham Crompton being such a person as aforesaid and again unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously and seditiously devising, contriving and intending as aforesaid afterwards, to wit, on aforesaid 1st day of December in the aforesaid 33rd year of the reign of our said Sovereign Lord and King with force and arms at Chorley aforesaid in the County aforesaid in order to compleat, perfect and bring to affect his most his most wicked and seditious contrivances and intentions aforesaid in the presence and hearing of [diverse?] subjects of our Sovereign Lord and King unlawfully, wickedly, maliciously and seditiously did say, utter and publish of and concerning the constitution and Government of this Kingdom the scandalous and seditious words following, to wit, [Imeaning?] himself the aforesaid Abraham for a revolution, no King, no Lords meaning a revolution in the aforesaid constitution and government of this Kingdom and that there should be no King, or Peers of this Realm in the Constitution and Government thereof in contempt of our Sovereign Lord the King and the Laws of this Kingdom to the great danger of our happy constitution, to the evil and pernicious example of all those in the like case affording and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his Crown and dignity where upon the said Attorney General of our said Lord the King who for our said Lord the King in the behalf prosecuteth for our said Lord the King prayeth this consideration of the court here in the premises and that due process of Law may be accorded against him the aforesaid Abraham Crompton in this behalf to make him answer to our said Lord and King touching and concerning these [Premds?] aforesaid?   

 

4 January 1794.  Letter from James Caldwell to Messers Peakes.

Caldwell 4/6 January 1794

Montpelier.

Messrs Peakes

Newcastle, 4th January 1794

Sometime after I purchased the Estate called  Montpelier from the Trustees of Mr Lawton, I requested the Honour of you to search the Rolls for Judgments that might be entered up against him from April 1773, the date of his Purchase Deed, to December 1778, the date of the Conveyance to Messrs Bate and Yoxall the Trustees; when you informed me by the letter which I send herewith, of among others, one at the suit of Samuel Hooker in Michaelmas Term 1777 in the Kings Bench without it appearing for what sum. On application being made to Mr Lawton, I was informed that he never had executed any Warrant of Attorney to, or had any transaction with any person of that name; on which Assurance I rested satisfied, concluding that there must have been some mistake as that such Judgment was against some other John Lawton. But as I have lately laid out, and am still laying out considerable sums of money in building and other improvements on this Estate, which I mean to make my residence, I wish to do away if possible the shadow of doubt upon the silly, and I shall therefore be obliged by your searching the Rolls again from the time of the purchase to that of the next Deeds.

This I apprehend will be sufficient; as I presume, that Judgments entered up against Mr Lawton before he purchased, or after he conveyed his Estate to [Churley?] could not affect an intermediate purchaser, but this I submit to you. From searching the Treasury Roll you find Hookers [Hockers?] Judgment regularly docketed, the Attorney’s name will of course appear (by his Entry in the Office of the Clerk of the Judgment). By a cautious reference to whom you may easily learn whether this Judgment is against John Lawton of Lawton. The Judgment entered up in 1775 is accompanied by a Grant out of the Estates and this Annuity is now regularly paid. The other Annuities of 50 and 100 to Bigg and Broomhead have always been represented to me as secured only by Bronds and Judgment, on which Mr Lawton has been taken, vis now charged with a Ca.Sa. But in case of the death of Mr Lawton in Execution, could any other Execution be afterwards sued out against my Estate? You will recollect that it was bona fide purchased under a Deed for the benefit of payment of creditors, which seems to bring it completely within - - [word rubbed out] the Proviso in the Act of James the First I shall esteem myself much obliged by your early and careful attentions to this business, as it has cost me some uneasiness and should you think it necessary to take the Advice of, or lay the papers before Counsel, I wish you to do it. I have sent the papers with Mr Attherton’s opinions and the Draft of the Conveyance as executed to me, which will make you compleat masters of the whole case. No Sum being specified in the Entry of Hooker’s Judgment, would this affect a purchaser? Please to search the Treasury Roll in each of the Courts as far as you think needful, and it will perhaps be right to see what Executions are taken out against Mr Lawton.

I am

Dear Sir,

Sincerely yours.

James Caldwell

PS. I shall be obliged by a line as soon as possible.

 

15 June 1794.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.

Baptism: Louisa Catherine, daughter of Mr James Caldwell, born 6 June.

 

 

16 January 1794.  Letter to James Caldwell from Thomas Peake.

Single

Mr Caldwell, Attorney at Law

Newcastle

Staffordshire.

5

Mr Caldwell

D of – Bgs 16 January 1794

We have searched the Kings Bench Common Pleas and Exchequer from 1772 to 1778 both inclusive and cannot find any more Judgments against Mr Lawton than what we informed you of before. We have found at your Inrolment Office an Inrolment in 1778 of a Deed dated in March 1775 [X] whereby Mr Lawton granted to Mr Broomhead an annuity of 100L to be issuing out of his land in the Parishes of Lawton and Bartomley in the County of Chester and Wolstanton in the Court of Stafford, as the [living?] Act did not commence till 1777 it certainly was not necessary to enroll the Deed of 1775, the above annuity is also secured by Judgment. We have also found the enrolment of an annuity of 100L granted by Mr Lawton to Mr Broomhead in 1777 and another annuity of 50L granted in 1777 to Mr Biggs; both these last mentioned annuities are secured by Bonds and Judgments only. We cannot find out any name of Hookers Attorney till the Term [Robert?]

Thomas Peake

We will make an effort to find only a name of Hooker’s Attorney

[X] Entered in the King’s Bench in 1775 for 1200L debt 63/- damages

 

2 January 1795.  Josiah Wedgwood dies.  His executors are his son John Wedgwood and his solicitor James Caldwell.

 

10 April 1795.  Part printed form with handwritten infills.

Five Per Cent Annuities

Received 10 day of April 1795 of Mr Thomas Jackson the sum of Three Hundred and eighty one pounds 10/ being the consideration for Four Hundred pounds

Interest or Share in the Capital or Joint Stock of Five Cent Annuities, (erected by an Act of Parliament of the 24th Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George III, intitled, An Act for granting Annuities to satisfy certain Navy, Victualling and Transport Bills, and Ordnance Debentures, and by other subsequent Acts) transferable at the Bank of England, together with the Proportional Annuity attending the same, by me this day transferred to the said Thomas Jackson Witness my Hand, J Paycroft.

 

25 December 1795.  Recorded in the Staffordshire Advertiser for 6 February 1796. 

THE PARTNERSHIP lately subsisting between JAMES CALDWELL, late of NEWCASTLE-UNDERLYME, in the county of Stafford, ATTORNEY AT LAW, and JOHN MARTIN of the same place, ATTORNEY AT LAW, was DISSOLVED on the 25th December last; Mr CALDWELL declined the Business in favour of Mr MARTIN, and by whom in future it will be carried on.  25th January 1796.

 

8 January 1796.  From the book "The Wood Family of Burslem" by Frank Faulkner, published 1912.

Mr Caldwell presided at a meeting of the Committee at the Legs of Man in Burslem on Friday the 8th day of January 1796 for the purpose of arranging a system of prices of pottery.  (Falkner p.65) comments: The fact that Mr Caldwell presided at this meeting confirms the tradition that his interests were mainly financial, and although not a practical potter he was recognised as a man of business capacity and of influence.

 

4 July 1796.  Very ragged letter addressed to James Caldwell.  Large sections missing.

Mr Caldwell

-wton, 4th July 1796

-Mr Bate, Mr Robert Cox (one of Mr Lawton’s Tenants and the Director of his Family Business) –ere together, and have determined that the –ed Montpelier which you some time ago –ed after, shall be sold.

If agreeable to you, Mr Bate and I will submit the value of it to Mr Honshall of Long Port and Mr Cox, which if agreed upon by them and you approve, we will use our utmost endeavours to prevail on Mr Lawton to accede to, with all the expedition in our Power.

My respectful compliments

I am Sir, your obliged and most obedient Servant,

William Yoxall.

 

WM 1565 Keele University Library.
18 August 1796
Letter from Josiah Wedgwood to James Caldwell

 

WM 1565 Keele University Library.
23 August 1796
Letter from Josiah Wedgwood to James Caldwell

 

WM 1565 Keele University Library.
30 August 1796 
Letter from Josiah Wedgwood to James Caldwell

 

WM 1565 Keele University Library.
19 September 1796 
Letter from Josiah Wedgwood to James Caldwell.

 

 

22 November 1796.  Letter to James Caldwell from Thomas Hinkley.

James Caldwell Esq.

Linley Wood

Newcastle

Sir,

I am directed by the Lord Lieutenant to inform you, that your appointment of Deputy Lieutenant for this County, has been executed, and is now deposited in the Clerk of the Peace’s Office in Stafford. It is necessary to observe, that you should within six months take the oaths, and subscribe the declaration, as directed by the 13th Section of the Militia Act of 26th of this present Majesty, unless you have already complied with those forms.

I am, Sir

Your very obedient

And humble Servant,

Thomas Hinckley

Stafford, 22nd Nov 1796

 

1797?  Partnership between William Bent and James Caldwell, regarding their Brewery business.  William Bent was a younger son of Dr. James Bent who built Basford Hall, c. 1781. He built a Potworks on the site of the present Borough Arms Hotel in 1790 or 1791.  The concern did not prosper and in 1797 the partnership of Bent and James Bulkley, who supplied the capital, was dissolved.  Shortly afterwards William Bent converted the pottery into a brewery.  This new venture was a great success.  William Bent died on the 24th of February, 1820, aged 56, and was buried in St Giles's churchyard, Newcastle.  The brewing concern run in partnership with James Caldwell consisted of 4 breweries in Newcastle-under-Lyme, Shrewsbury, Macclesfield and Liverpool.  The brewery was put up for auction in 1824 but failed to find a purchaser.  It was let to tenants and by 1836 had been sold to Messrs Rogers, Baker & Hindle.

 

 

28 January 1797.  Letter from Abraham Crompton to James Caldwell

James Caldwell

At Linley Wood

Near Lawton, 5 [miles?]

Cheshire

Chorley

January 28th 1797

Sir,

Your [Fav?] of the 17th inst received, was glad to hear of you all being very well. As to myself, I have for a couple of months past been very much indisposed and stirred not much out of doors, and could for weeks not write at all, nor weigh Gold for about a fortnight past, been much better and do now stir out, up the street. Have had some time ago great deafness in my ears which is very troublesome, that can scarce understand people when they talk to me and do not expect any relief than warmer weather comes on. There has been here for months past a general sickness of various illnesses amongst most people, as the weather has been so severe. I do think you have judged right in purchasing the lands contiguous to your country seat; if you want any assistance of money or on the occasion, can do it for you any time. All well at Chorley Hall. They desire their respects, my nephew is in Liverpool, expect his return on Monday next, and Doctor Crompton with him. What stay he will make we know not, they speak of Mr Francis coming soon for a few nights, my nephew sometimes ago began to build some walls in the yard but dropt proceeding farther at present for the winter season. He began it wrong end of they year for such operations. Expect you visiting us sometime next summer and shall be glad to see you when convenient. It’s quite entertaining taking a circular journey and did last year, if I do, should do it to know your healths, should make a shorter stay than what I made last summer as I then saw all curiosities necessary. I need not to see them over again, shall be always glad to hear your good healths when at leisure to write to me; my dear respects to you all in general from,

Sir your humble servant,

Abraham Crompton Senior

 

 

Letter to James Caldwell from Abraham Crompton

James Caldwell

At Linley Wood

Near Lawton

Cheshire

Chorley  February 12th 1797

Sir,

Was mighty glad to hear by Doctor Crompton of you all being in good healths, wish a continuance of it, they leave Chorley Hall in the morning to return to Derby, will spend a couple nights at Liverpool. My nephew and niece will company them thither for day or so longer. Story in my Manchester newspaper this morning by Crowdry and Boden was the bad and shocking accident that lately happened near you at Burslem. When Niece Stamford visits Mrs Hardman at Manchester please send me without noticeing to others (your Family excepted), the names of all your children, birthdays and ages. Also the Inscription on the Tomb or monument near your garden. Am not in the least hurry of them, but a letter sent by Niece Stamford, will afterwards be sent by Mrs Pilkington to Bolton and to me from there to Chorley. Relations with us are tolerable well and you will be informed by the Doctor. My respects &c to you all in general. Am using my Pen by candlelight which I do not often do, am better considerably than what I was for some months past, my deafness very bad, that I can scarce understand people when they talk to me except I sit very near them, do not expect much amendment of them until warm weather comes on.

I am

Sir

Your humble servant

Abraham Crompton Senior.

 

20 June 1797. From the book "The Wood Family of Burslem" by Frank Faulkner, published 1912.  
Mr James Caldwell presided at a meeting of the inhabitants of the parish of Burslem held at the Legs of Man Inn on the 20th day of June 1797 for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of forming a Volunteer Corps within the said parish.  It was unanimously resolved that a volunteer corps of Infantry be formed within the said parish in case the same shall hereafter be thought expedient.  All applications to be made to the Lord Lieutenant of the County.  Such Corps not to go out of the parish except by their own accord. (Falkner p.67).

 

34-5916 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
13 November 1797
Letter from James Caldwell to Mr Byerley of Etruria regarding the estate of Thomas Wedgwood.

 

34-5917 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
11 January 1798
Letter from James Caldwell to Mr Byerley regarding the late partnership of Sparrow & Caldwell and a payment of £50 made by Mr Wedgwood to John Sparrow 25 July 1785.

 

12-2252 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
7 April 1798
Bill of Sale of French Grey Ware from Wood & Caldwell to Josiah Wedgwood and Byerley £12:13:8

 

12-2253 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
28 April 1798
Bill of Sale of French Grey Ware from Wood & Caldwell to Josiah Wedgwood and Byerley £2:10:8

 

34-5918 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
30 November 1798
Letter from James Caldwell to Mr Byerley regarding a dispute over a lease of some land for railway building.  The lease in question being between Mr Wood and Josiah Wedgwood.  James Caldwell threatens legal action.

 

Illegible note regarding a drawing being paid for by Hannah Stamford for £3.

Thornhaugh, Bedford Square, London 26th, ?, 1799.

 

 

 

7 August 1799? Letter to James Caldwell from Atherton Greaves and Denison but not dated.

Mr Caldwell

Mr Lawrence’s

Digbeth

Birmingham

Birmingham.

James Caldwell Esq,

Sir,

Mr Crompton of Chorley Hall has been here this day with the [approbates?] of all the [trustees?] conveyed has ordered the money transfers from the 30 June [-] his own Legacy [ - - ] for [-] in lieu thereof we have given him our acknowledgement bearing 4 per C Interest, same as the one we now enclose for you and Mrs Caldwell’s signature [with?] another for Miss Stamford which you will please return to us when signed. I think we should [-] the Legacy and [& Derby?] of 4 per Cent being £813.10 [-] which we should [- - ] £616[?] that since then Mr Crompton [-] a  £430 more which makes £750[?] [-] whereof will agree with the [ - ] £4174.9.10. We are much obliged by your [-] giving us notice when you [ - ] part of the money [ - - ] a week or ten days previous intentions which will oblige.

Sir

Your very humble servant

Atherton Greaves and Denison

7 August 1779.  Letter from James Caldwell to Abraham Crompton.

Abraham Crompton

Chorley Hall

Chorley

Lancashire

Dear Sir,

Mr Caldwell has shewn me Mr Crompton’s letter of Wednesday last, and as the Doctor is not [here?] to take the money in the manner preferred [hole in letter] I think the arrangements you have made with the Preston Bank highly proper and that if you will take the trouble of getting the money from Heywoods so that it may be divided with the others the business will be much facilitated. As the Act of Parliament imposes a penalty of 10 per cent on any executor or administrator who shall pay any legacy or residue without taking such a Receipt as that which I inclosed to you, it will be necessary that on the 1st [instant?] each party gives such a Receipt, whether they received the money in Bank notes, or leave it in Messr’s [Allerton, Albert?] own hands. The letter of which will be the case in respect to Miss Stamford and Mrs Caldwell’s shares. When, however, it is settled whether Heywoods [Hagwoods?] Money will be divided or not at the time of the first installment of Athertons, I shall be much obliged to you, or them to inform me of the gross amount of such installment in so far that I may fill up two Receipts accordingly and which I will send duly signed to Messrs Athertons who will perhaps take the trouble of paying the Legacy duty upon each parties Installment and returning the Receipts to the Distributor of Stamps at Preston. The business will be so far correct and the same course may be pursued in respect to the future installments. I have not yet received the Bills for the Administration but as soon as I do, I will send them either to you or Mr Leigh. Mrs Caldwell and Miss Stamford beg to [join?] their kind respects to Mrs Crompton and yourself.

With Dear Sir

Yours sincerely

James Caldwell

Linley Wood

7th August 1799

P.S. I presume that it will be sufficient if you and Mrs Caldwell addressed letters to Messrs Atherton & Co., requesting them to make the payments on the 1st August and [sent?] as soon as it is determined whether Heywoods [Hagwoods?] money will be divided on that day or not, they had better send such Order as they may judge to be signed by you and Mrs C. I perfectly agree with you in opinion as it is better for such of the Parties as choose to receive the Shares in Bank notes to attend at Preston for the purpose, than that they should apps through the hands of the Administrators.

27 June 1799.  Letter to James Caldwell from Atherton Greaves and Dension.

James Caldwell

Linley Wood

Near Lawton

Cheshire 3

Preston June 27th, 1799

[to] James Caldwell Esq.

Sir,

We beg your [reforms?] to our respects of the 16th Inst have now to advise Mr Crompton of Chorley hall has been here this day, for the payments of the late Mr Crompton’s property now in our hands to be [ - ] forwarded this[-] to you.

1000 to the 1st August

1000 to the 1st September

1000 to the 1st October

1000 to the 1st November

Mr Cromptons does not take away his £ 4,000 and [desires?] the same to be [b—d] to his   - you will beg the same manner might be prepared with the Bank Notes accordingly we are at your convenience all much obliged.

Your most Humble Servant,

Atherton Greaves and Dension

 

 

8 June 1799.  Recorded in the Newcastle Parish Register.
William Turner of St Andrews, Newcastle upon Tyne married Jane Willets, of Newcastle under Lyme; Witnesses: James Caldwell & Ann Willets.

 

12-2254, 2255, 2256 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Notes from Wood & Caldwell  to Wedgwood, regarding need for clay and the possibility of purchasing some from Wedgwood.

 

28-20691 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
October 1799
Bill of Sale from Wood & Caldwell to Messers Wedgwood and Byerley (Thomas Byerley 1747-1810) for £16:8:10

 

October 1799.  Note to James Caldwell from Atherton Greaves and Dension.

James Caldwell Esq,

[from] Preston, October -th 1799

Sir,

Agreeable to your favour of the – Inst we this day met our draught at ½ months [fod?] £1800 – to Messrs Vine & Co of the - - of Newcastle - -

Sir

Your most humble servant

Atherton, Greaves & Denison

Crompton Esq., leg ads Rep

An understanding from my Agent Mr. Peake that on the 17th instant a Rule to plead was given on this matter which will expire on the 5th May. I take the liberty of enquiring whether the Attorney General has yet taken any notice of Mr Crompton’s Representation of his case which you was so obliging as to deliver, or whether the Presentation[?] is still intended to be carried on  - - in which Mr Crompton --  sufficient.

[on back – A.C. 24th April 1793]

 

1800 James Caldwell approx 40 years old

 

1800-1810? Letter to Mrs Caldwell. Undated.  Could be a draft? Pencil note ‘From Mr Rymsdyk, Dancing Master to Mr Caldwell.’

Madame,

To preserve my Character from any reproach Credit has induced me to address this to you. As I do not expect to have the honor of attending your family above once more or perhaps not again, with your permission humbly request the favor and honor of your Note impartially to mention wether have given satisfaction during the time I had the honor of attending.

As I shall find them to my friend Mr – and Mrs Degville in town hope I shall not do him any discredit. Mr D Edgville and my friends would feel perfectly happy if  I gave satisfaction with the greatest submission and respect to Mr Zuchelli, late assistant. I beg leave to subscribe myself your most devoted obedient and humble Servant.

J Rymsdyke

Hope I have improved the young ladies dancing.

As I shall endeavour to preserve a little business by Degrees in Town on my own account, if you should come to town I shall be very happy to have the honor and encouragement of attending your family at any Hotel you may be at, or anywhere in town you might think proper. In town I should there teach to my own method and in the present fashion, that is if you will be so kind as to confer me the honor and preference of a stranger would try to expect to merit your approbation it might be in your power to recommend me to any little school or family or any triffle which I would be very thankful for the such honor conferred on me as every body must have a beginning would endeavour to procure myself credit from your recommendation.

I have inclosed the address of my Attorney whom I am obliged to call upon frequently (respecting a [edit?] in Chancery). Be got that it at any time it may be in your power to serve me to honour me with your introduction to any body and to anything. Any note can be forwarded to me for my Attorney till I am settled in town when I can then acquaint you otherwise.

For my address

Mr J Rymsdyk

To be addressed at

Mr Smarts Attorney

Clement Inn

London

My terms for Ladies Schools in or near Town One Guinea for Quarter. To private lessons or families about 7or 10-6 for lessons. Can teach any thing in Dancing may be wished for of Fancy Dances of one two five three or more likewise with Single Scotch Dances or anything in the most genteel manner in the Profession which I mostly learnt from late master Mr Zuchelli from the Opera as I have already given up my attention to the higher parts of Dancing and encouragement or communication will esteem great honor and be very thankful for. Pray pardon the haste I write in.

J Rymsdyk

 

22 January 1801.  James Caldwell appointed Recorder.

22 January 1801: Mr Thomas Fenton gave Notice that he should move at the next Assembly that the rights and privileges of this Borough be granted to James Caldwell of Linley Wood Esquire as an Honorary Burgess And that he should also move that the said James Caldwell be appointed Recorder of this Borough in the place or stead of George Embury Tollet Esquire who hath now resigned the said Office.

 

14 February 1801.  James Caldwell’s daughter Frances died, aged 5.

25 February 1801.  Letter to James Caldwell from T Armistead on behalf of Mrs Tollet.  Relating to the death of James’s daughter Frances Caldwell who died 14 February 1801 aged 5.

James Caldwell, Linley Wood.

From

Betley Hall, February 25th 1801

Sir,

Being now at Betley Hall Mrs Tollet desires me to write to you to say, that she very sincerely condoles with Mrs Caldwell and yourself in your afflictions. She will be happy to see you here either when Mr Tollet comes over, or at any other time that you can make it convenient. She would have written to you herself but her eye-sight is so bad; and her feelings on the occasion much as to render her unequal to doing it. She will be happy to hear that Mrs Caldwell and you are as well as can be expected. Permit me to add that I truly feel for you in your present situation, and am now sir

Your obedient servant.

T. Armistead.

 

10 March 1801. Election of James Caldwell to Recordership for Newcastle.

Election to Recordership


Borough of Newcastle under Lyme

Assembled in the Guild Hall of the said Borough all or a major part of the Common Council present the 10th day of March 1801 according to the liberties and privileges of the said Borough.

I pursuance of the Notice given at the last Assembly Mr Thomas Fenton now moved that the rights and privileges of this Borough be granted to James Caldwell Esquire as an Honorary Burgess and the same were granted to him accordingly

And also in pursuance of the like Notice he also moved that the said James Caldwell be appointed Recorder of this Borough in the place and stead of George Embury Tollet who hath resigned which motion was by the Corporation unanimously agreed to.

Ordered. That the appointment and recommendation to his Majesty the Corporation of the said James Caldwell to the said Office of Recorder be sealed with the Common Seal of the Corporation.

 

22 April 1801: At this Assembly James Caldwell Esq. appeared and took the Oath of an Honorary Burgess according to the liberties and privileges of the said Borough granted to him by the last Assembly.  Ordered That the appointment of the said James Caldwell to the Office of Recorder of this Borough at the last Assembly in the place and stead of George Embury Tollet Esq. who resigned and which appointment is now produced and read be sealed with the corporation Common Seal of this Borough And that the recommendation to his Majesty for his Royal approbation be also Sealed with the said Common Seal and presented accordingly And at this Assembly the said James Caldwell took the Oath of Office of Recorder and the other qualifying Oaths enjoined by Law.

 

12-2258 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
8 May 1801
Bill of Sale for some Wood & Caldwell table ware to Wedgwood & Byerley.  24 Bowls.  £2:3:11

It should be noted that, in the Wedgwood archive, there are quite a few bills of sale for Wood & Caldwell wares to Wedgwood over quite a considerable time period.

 

12-2259 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
22 May 1801
Bill of Sale for some Wood & Caldwell table ware to Wedgwood & Byerley.  Some Bowls.  £0:5:8

 

22 January 1802.  Recorded in the Newcastle Corporation Order Book.  
James Caldwell is appointed Recorder for Newcastle.

 

 

22 June 1802. Note confirming James Caldwell appointed as Recorder for Newcastle under Lyme.

James Caldwell Esq.

Recorder of Newcastle under Lyme

Approbation

George R [signature]

George the third by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King Defender of the Faith &c. To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting: Whereas the Mayor, Sheriffs and Capital Burgesses of Our Borough of Newcastle under Lyme, or the major part thereof, have by an Instrument under their Common Seal bearing date the Twenty-second day of April 1801, humbly certified unto Us, that they have unanimously elected and chosen James Caldwell of Linley Wood in the County of Stafford Esquire to be Recorder of the said Borough in the room and stead of George Embury Tollet Esquire the late Recorder thereof who hath resigned, and have besought Us to approve their said Election; We being well satisfied of the Loyalty, Integrity and Abilities of the said James Caldwell have thought fit to condescend to their request; And We do by these Presents according to the Power and Authority reserved unto Us by their Charter, for Us, Our Heirs and Successors approve and confirm him the said James Caldwell to be Recorder of Our said Borough of Newcastle under Lyme Given at Our Court at Saint James’s the Twenty-second day of June 1802 in the Forty-second year of Our Reign. By His Majesty’s Command

Pelham

 

 

24 December 1802.  James Caldwell and William Bent buying land.  Large parchment document in the Staffordshire Record Office D593/B1/13/63/1.  Dated 24 December 1802.  Charlotte Susanna Beard of Chester, only child of the late Nathaniel Beard of Newcastle-under-Lyme, sold land for £420 to Messers James Caldwell of Linley Wood, William Bent of Newcastle, John Barrow of Newcastle.  The land concerned was Red Flatt, Brampton.  It had been previously owned by Thomas Emery.  Also sold was Kings Field part of which had previously been under the tenure of John Mason, Victualler and another part under the tenure of John Beckett, Grocer.  The land is described in the document as being "six several days work of land in the Brampton and Kings Field within the Borough and Parish of Newcastle-under-Lyme.  The actual sale is recorded as being to " Mr Thomas Sparrow in trust for Messers Caldwell, Bent and Barrow".

 

 

1803.  Printed leaflet for Panorama ‘View of Paris’ shown at Leicester Square.

 

Panorama, Leicester Square in the Lower Circle is represented a most magnificent view of Paris and in the Upper Circle the superb view of Constantinople for a short time. 1803.

Mr Barker, inventor and proprietor of the Panorama, Leicester Square, where a succession of views will be contained as usual, has no connexion with the Panorama in the Strand, nor with any other Painting in London.

In order to preserve from destruction some of those interesting Paintings which have met with general approbation, at the Panorama, Leicester Square, Mr. Barker wishes to dispose of them, in such proportions as Gentlemen may choose, according to the length and height of the place the intend to occupy. Beautiful views may be obtained, of a reasonable size, for a Hall, Gallery, Staircase, or Termination of a Walk,without injuring the effect of the Painting; and would prove an acceptable and valuable present to any corporation, for their hall, or other pubic place, in town or in the country.

Open from ten till Dusk. Admittance to each painting One Shilling.

 

 

28-20582 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
1803
Letter from James Caldwell to Mr Tompkinson.

 

10 February 1803.  Recorded in Harold Blakey, Sun Fire Insurance Policies, Volume 53, Policy 744679.  
James Caldwell of Linley Wood in the Co. of Stafford, Esq.  On his dwelling house situate as aforesaid, brick and tiled, not exceeding Y800.

 

 

30 March 1803.  Printed note.

Wednesday, 30th March, 1803.

In Compliance with a respectable Requisition to me for the Purpose, I do hereby appoint a Meeting of the Inhabitants of this Borough, at the Guildhall, on Friday next, at Twelve O’clock, to take into Consideration the Propriety of Presenting a  Congratulatory Address to His Majesty on his escape from the Treasonable Conspiracy formed against his Person and Government.

John Smith, Mayor.

Smith, Printer, Newcastle

 

22 April 1803.  Letter from Thomas Fenton to Robert Lawley.

Lichfield April twenty two 1803

Thomas Fenton Esq

Newcastle underLyme

Staffordshire

From Robert Lawley.

Canwell 22nd April 1803

Dear Sir,

I have received a letter from Mr Bootle informing me that he has desired Mr Egerton to attend Mr Caldwell to the Levee’s. Perhaps in that case Mr Caldwell would excuse me going with him, as my strength does not increase in the proportion I could wish, and I really should dread the chance of renewing my illness by a journey to London.

Will you permit me to trouble you so far as to learn if this will not be very disagreeable to Mr Caldwell, or inattentive to the Burgesses of Newcastle, because if in either case you think it is, I am ready and determined to go at all events.

I have mislaid Mr Caldwell’s letter and therefore do not know his address, or else I certainly should write to him upon the subject; will you have the goodness to give my complements to him and inform him of what I have said, but beg him to say if he had rather I should accompany him.

I remain

Dear Sir

Your obedient servant,

Robert Lawley

 

 

25 July 1803.  James Caldwell and William Bent buying land.  Large parchment document in the Staffordshire Record Office D593/B1/13/63/2.  Dated 25 July 1803.  This seems to be a lease of some land owned by the Third Friendly Society.  The document is headed "The surviving trustees of the Third Friendly Society in Newcastle-under-Lyme to Mr Thomas Sparrow in trust for Messers Caldwell, Bent & Barrow".  "Convergence by Feoffment of four days work of land in the King's Field in Newcastle-under-Lyme and Assignment of a term of five hundred years to attend the Indenture £215".

 

28 July 1803.  From the book "The Wood Family of Burslem" by Frank Faulkner, published 1912.
"On the 28th July 1803, Mr James Caldwell presided at a meeting at which it was resolved unanimously That at this important crisis we feel ourselves indispensably called upon as Men and Britons to stand forward and make most active exertions for the defence and preservation of our King and Country.  Signed by Enoch Wood and others. (Falkner, p.67).

 

 

26 August 1803.  Letter to Lord Uxbridge from James Caldwell.

Lord Uxbridge

26 August 1803

 

Linley Wood near Newcastle

26th August 1803

My Lord,

I am unwilling to omit the very earliest opportunity of returning to your Lordship my most respectful acknowledgements for the letter which I had the honour to receive from your Lordship this morning, in consequence of Colonel Sneyd’s obliging communication of the Resolutions of the Inhabitants of Burselm; and I beg leave to inform your Lordship, that a Meeting has been appointed to be held, on Monday next, (being the earliest day that circumstances would admit) for the nomination of Officers, when, I flatter myself that a sufficient number of proper and respectable persons will be immediately found, to take the charge of three full and select Companies; and whose names I shall have the honour to transmit to your Lordship, for His Majesty’s approbation.

May I be permitted to assure your Lordship that the Inhabitants of Burslem, together with myself, most deeply and sensibly feel, the distinguished honour, as well as the high obligation, which your Lordship has been pleased to confer by so early and polite an attention to the intended Companies, and I have the honour to be, with the greatest respect,

My Lord,

Your Lordship’s most obedient

And

Most humble servant,

James Caldwell.

Earl of Uxbridge.

 

 

 

 

10 October 1804.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.  James had accompanied his son to begin at Cambridge University.

Mrs Caldwell

Linley Wood

Lawton

Cheshire

Cambridge October 10th 1804

If you could know my beloved Eliza, how selfishly I am following the impulses of my own heart in writing to you from this place, you would have little to thank me for, on the score of compliance with the wish, which you so kindly expressed before I left Linley Wood. Separation, my Eliza, I still find, as of old, to bring all its train of dear recollections and anticipations; and no sooner am I parted from you, than my thoughts turn, as if by some magnetic attraction, to the loved and valued objects that I have left behind. How it may be with others I know not, but for myself, I can only say that I have yet to learn (what I believe I shall never learn) that it is in the power of any lapse of time or advance in age, to abate the force, or blunt the edge of the strongest and the tenderest feelings of [my?] affection. Such be assured, that whilst a pulse beats, I shall ever experience towards you. We arrived here last night after a very pleasant journey; and as I have not time to enter into details of our proceedings, I shall only say that I have just left Mr Cotton with whom I am most entirely pleased and satisfied, after making choice of rooms, in which respect Stamford has been very fortunate, and providing Tea [keale?], gown and cap, and all the other important etceteras of college house keeping. Me Catton had very obligingly engaged us to dinner today but understanding that it would not be disagreeable to me to be introduced to Herbert Marsh, the celebrated scholar and historian of the politics of England and France, he has very obligingly changed the appointment till tomorrow, when we are to be introduced to each other. Cambridge, though certainly not so striking as Oxford, is nevertheless a fine place; nor will any accusation be against the Muses for having made the banks of the Cam one of their favourite abodes. Kings College went beyond my expectations. It is unquestionably the finest thing of the kind that I ever saw. It is 290 feet long, 78 feet high and 45 feet wide; all in the best style of the rich and ornamented gothic. But of all this when we meet. I have not yet totally abandoned the idea of returning by London though [Saturday?] will intervene, which is a [holiday?] in the Metropolis. I think that I shall give it up. If I go however, [wax] write again. Mr Ball[?] supped with us last night and has shewn us the most kind, pointed and unremitting attention. He will be a valuable acquaintance for Stamford, and is spoken of by Mr Catton in terms of great respect. Upon the whole everything wears as promising and comfortable appearance as one could wish; and we will therefore indulge the hope that the same kind power that has hitherto blessed our efforts for the happiness and welfare of our children will continue to us and to them his favour and protection. Next to him, what work as a Father and a Husband, do not I owe to you? My heart at this moment swells with gratitude, respect, esteem and love. Accept my Eliza all that these powerful sentiments and feelings can dictate, and share between you and my good and beloved girls my most tender and true affection. As Stamford is writing a line to you I shall leave him to speak for himself. Farewell, dear friend and partner of my heart and think of me ever as the most grateful and fondly affectionate of husbands.

James Caldwell

 

 

12 March 1805.  Letter to James Caldwell bill for wine.

James Caldwell Esq

Linley Wood

Talk on the Hill

Cheshire

A List

Of the Best Foreign Wines

Imported and sold by

John Ridings, Wine-Merchant

Wholesale and Retail

etc

James Caldwell Esq.

 

Bas. Of John Ridings

12th March 1805

6 Dozen best old port 47/-      14.2.0 

72 Bottles ref Hamper[?] 7/-   1.8.-

                                                £15.10.-

[letter half lost due to hole in paper.]

The two hampers of port were - - did and I hope will arrive safe – both pack’d and can vouch for the - - reiv a to Twiss.

- of this wine I am convinced you - - approve and although it has more aged - - than we generally can get, you will still find improvement by keeping.

I beg to be remembered to Mrs C and your family,

Remaining, yours sincerely

W Hindley

Manchester 12th March 1805

 

34-5919 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
26 May 1805
Letter from James Caldwell to Josiah Wedgwood welcoming him and his family back to the area.

 

 

14 October 1805.  Concert

Concert

At the Town Hall, Burslem

On Monday 14, October 1805.

Scheme of Performance.

Act I

Overture – Vanhall.

Song, Mr Ward

Glee, Calcot

Quartello, Pleyel

Song, Mrs Burrows

Overture Sampson, Handel

Act II

Overture, Occasional, Handel

Song, Mr. Burrows

Glee, Calcot.

Song, Mr Ward

Overture, Ditters

Song, God Save the King.

Verse and Chorus

Between the Acts, a Hunting Duet.

Song, Mr Ward – Handel:

Love found th’ Alarm, and fear is flying,

When Beauty’s Prize, what mortal fears dying?

In defence of my Treasure I bleed at each vein,

Without her no pleasure, for Life is a Pain.

[Other songs written up][

God Save the King.

God save great George our King,

Long live our noble King,

God save the King;

Send him victorious,

Happy and glorious

Long to reign over us-

God save the King

O Lord, our God arise,

Scatter our enemies

And make them fall:

Confound their politics,

Frustrate their knavish tricks,

On George our hopes we’ll fix,

God save the King. &c.

 

13 June 1805. Letter and receipt to James Caldwell from the London tailor W Broklesby regarding clothes for James Caldwell and his son James Stamford Caldwell.

No.66 Margaret St, Cavendish Square

Londno

James Caldwell Esq.

To W & C Broklesby

29th Sept 1804

Making an olive coat lapelled and materials -                         -

2 ½ yards superfine Cloth                                           23/-      2./

20 Coat 4 Breast bust treble gilt buttons                    3/6       -6

A pair of superfine blue cloth Pantaloons lined compleat      1/

Box &c                                                                                    -

3rd January 1805

Making a blue coat lappuled and materials                             -19

1 1/2yards superior blue cloth                                     25/       2-

20 Coat 4 Breast best tuble gilt buttons                     3/6       -6

A superfine white diamante quilting Waistcoat                     1 /2-

A pair of best drab patins and Breeches. Lined                     2/-

Box &c                                                                                    -/2/3

16 March 1805

Making a black Court lapelled and materials                          1/1/-

2 ½ yards superfine Cloth                                           23/       2/9/-

A fine black cashmere waistcoat                                            1/2/6

A pair of do. Breeches, lined                                                  1/7/6

Box &c.                                                                                   -/2/3

18 June 1805

Making a black coat lappeled and materials                           1/1/-

2 ½ yards superfine Cloth                                           23/       2/9/-

A rich black with Carathee Waistcoat                                    1/12/-

A pair of drab double milled cassmere Breeches, lined          1/12/-

A pair of superfine pants Do. lined.                                       1/3/6

Box &c.                                                                                   -/2/3

                                                                                                £27/2/4

Amount Bill sent                                                                     £13/2/6

                                                                                                £40/4/6

J.S. Caldwell Esq.                                                                   £20/1/6

Received overpayment of last account                                   £60/5/6

J.S. Caldwell Esq.

16th June 1804

A superfine blue cloth coat lapelled compleat                        -

Bset gilt anox buttons for ditto                                              -4/6

A superfine white diamond quilting waistcoat                       1/1/-

A fine buff printed quilting ditto                                           1/1/-

A pair fine drab cassmere breeches                                         1/7/0

Box &c                                                                                    -/2/-

Oct.1804

A superfine brown cloth coat lapelled compleat                    3/6/-

Fleurs faced silk                                                                      -/1/6

A fine white diamond quilting waistcoat                               1/1/-

A stripe torlmets ditto bound silk                                           1/1/-

A rich black silk waistcoat                                                      1/0/6

A pair of rich black silk breeches                                            2/6/-
A pair of fine drab cassmere ditto                                          1/7/6

2 pair of white silk stocking a per                                           1/12/-

1 pair of rich black silk ditto                                                   -/16/-

Box &c                                                                                    -/2/-

                                                                                                £20/1/-

An

By Bill remitted 25th September

Bill

London 13 June 1805

Sir,

I received your letter and was much surprised and very sorry to find you did not receive the box in time. I have ever endeavoured to be punctual as possible to your time, but was most particularly so then on account of its being mourning. I received your letter on the 15th and the box was delivered the following afternoon, the 16th by 5 o’clock and I have the receipt of the clerk at the Golden [Lion?], Charing Cross for the same, and although your disappointment was as bad from whatever cause it arose yet I am happy to think it did not originate from any inattention on my part but was owing to the negligence of persons belonging to the Coach. You may rely in the orders you may please to [furn?] me with being forwarded to your time, all possible exertions shall be used to prevent any disappointment. I have made the Breeches out of milled cassmere as you say the last are too slight than most are a sort now most generally worn.

I have included your sons account up to the end of the last year. The present year is placed to himself as he desired. The box contains your last order was sent to the Inn to by Mail last Wednesday and hope it is safely arrived.

I remain Sir

Your humble servant

W Broklesby.

 

 

? July 1805.  Bill for James Stamford Caldwell.

Mr Caldwell’s Bill for the Quarter ending at Midst 1805

                                                £. s. d.

4th Month,       {Commons      2.11.11

{Sizings           1.11. 8

5th Month        {Commons      2.11.11

{Sizings           1.  4.  8

6th Month,       {Commons      1.19.4½

{Sizings           1. 8.11

Fellow’s Butler                       1.10.-

Cook                                       1.10.-

Professor Faresh                      3. 3.-

Bedmaker                                -.18.-               

Laundress                                1.10.-

Chamber                                  1.10.-

Tuition                                     2.10.-

Cash                                        3.-.-

Barber                                                 -.-.-

Chandler                                 1.10.-

Coal Merchant                                    2.9.10½

Bookseller                               6.14.6

Draper                                     -.-.-

Taylor                                      12.5.3

Milliner and Hosier                 1.18.11

Shoe-maker                             1.10.-

Breeches-maker                       -.-.-

Hatter                                      -.-.-

Brazier                                     -.-.-

Smith                                       -.-.-

Upholsterer                             -.-.-

Glazier                                     -.5.-

Apothecary                             -.-.-

                                                £53.13.-

Deduct Scholarship                 £5.1.4

Remains due                           £48.11.8

Mr Catto [hole in paper]
Mess Thomas [hole in paper] Co
Strand [hole in paper]

 

 

7 November 1805Letter from H Hindley in Manchester to James Caldwell at Linley Wood.

 

To James Caldwell Esq

Linley Wood

Talk on the Hill

Cheshire

Manchester

7th November 1805

Dear Sir,

I was unexpectedly obliged to go out of town on Tuesday evening and could not see to the forwarding the first and last night. I left particular orders about it and find that a cod, sparlings, couple of rabbits and shrimps were forwarded by Mail. All very fine indeed, but I am much disappointed at the lobsters not being sent. I had a positive promise of them but there was not a single one came to town, or any good oysters. I shall be glad to hear all come in time and was approved.

I debit you for the amount £3.16.6.

And now let me congratulate you upon the glorious news of the day, it is of so different a Mach to what we have been accustomed to hear for some days back that the people are almost frantick. I hope Lord Nelson may be safe, but it is reported he died soon after the action.

Believe me dear sir,

Yours truly

H. Hindley

Best respects to Mrs Caldwell and family.

 

12-2260 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
31 January 1806
Bill of Sale for large amount of Wood & Caldwell table ware to Wedgwood & Byerley.  £29:19:6

 

12-2261 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
1 February 1806
Bill of Sale for some Wood & Caldwell table ware to Wedgwood & Byerley.  £0:18:0

 

12-2264 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
8 February 1806
Letter from Wood & Caldwell to Wedgwood & Byerley requesting help regarding the need for some paving stone for a flint pan.

 

12-2262 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
7 March 1806
Bill of Sale for some Wood & Caldwell table ware to Wedgwood & Byerley.  £0:2:0

 

 

26 March 1806.  Printed note with hand written additions relating to prisoners in the county jail.

Staffordshire.

Lent Assizes, March 26, 1806

Calendar of the Prisoners

For Felony and Misdemeanors

In the Gaol for the said County

William Phillips Inge Esq. Sheriff

Convicted Prisoners

Jane Soulby – Convicted Lent Assizes 1805,

Joyce Taye – Convicted Midsummer Sessions 1805

James Hollins – Convicted Summer Assizes 1805

Edward Oliver – Convicted Summer Assizes 1805

John Hassall – Convicted Michaelmas Sessions 1805

Thamas Martin – Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

Remain to be Transported according to their respective Sentences.

John Bartlay – Acquitted Lend Assizes 1805, on account of Insanity, ordered to remain in Gaol until his Majesty’s pleasure respecting him be known.

Francis Paddy – Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1805

Mary Bratt – Convicted Lent Assizes 1805

Letitia Aston – Convicted Lend Assizes 1805

William Bennitt – Convicted Midsummer Sessions 1805

Frances Bird – Convicted Midsummer Sessions 1805

Edward Priest – Convicted Summer Assizes 1805

Bagnal Beech - Convicted Summer Assizes 1805

James Whitehouse - Convicted Summer Assizes 1805

Elizabeth Pinches - Convicted Summer Assizes 1805

Edward Lea – Convicted Michaelmas Sessions 1805

John Jones - Convicted Michaelmas Sessions 1805

William Wagstaff - Convicted Michaelmas Sessions 1805

Benjamin Cartwright – Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

George Heaton - Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

Thomas Cotterill - Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

William Hamlett - Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

Sarah Handley - Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

Catherine Betts - Convicted Epiphany Sessions 1806

Remain at Hard Labour according to their respective Sentences

J.W. Caldwell

[Page 2]

Prisoners for Trial

1.         Penelope Edwards aged 19 – Indicted at the last Assizes, for the murder of Elizabeth Adams, but it appearing to the Court, she ought to have been indicted for Pettit Treason, she was ordered to remain. - JB

2.         John Kelsall aged 19 – Committed August 26th, by T.Fenton Esq. one of the Justices for the Borough of Newcastle; charged with being an accomplice with Joseph Hackley, in feloniously getting possession of a draft or bill of exchange, of the value of fifteen pounds, inclosed in a letter, delivered by the Postmaster of Newcastle to the said Joseph Hackley, and with receiving part of the said money for his own use.

3.         Samuel Baggaley aged 51 – Committed September 21st, by Charles Oakes, Esq. Mayor or Tamworth; charged with stealing a bay mare, the property of Thomas Holloway. T:B:

4.         John Mackdonald aged 30 – Committed October 19th, by the Rev. Mr. Granville; charge with stealing a black mare, the property of William Kenright. T:B:

5.         Thomas Clark aged 24 – Committed December 11th, by the Rev. Mr. Haden; charged with having cut and wounded with a sharp instrument George Hall, in breech of the peace. - No true Bill

6.         David Jones aged 25 – Committed December 21st, by the Rev. Mr. Higgins, and the Rev.Mr. Whitby; charged with stealing one ewe sheep, the property of Francis Wedge. T:B:

7.         John Boughey aged 30 – Committed January 4th, by Francis Eld, Esq. and the Rev. Mr. Whitby; charged with having feloniously assaulted and ravished Honor Cotton, against her will. T:B:

8.         Catherine Rogers aged 64 – Committed January 8th, by the Rev. Mr. Haden; charged with stealing from the dwelling house of Isaac Spragg, a seven shilling piece of gold, and with burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling house. T:B:

9.         Daniel Flavel aged 33 – Committed January 20th, by the Rev. Mr. Cartwright; charged with assaulting on the highway Daniel Blackham, and feloniously stealing from him two fowls, his property. T:B:

10.       Abraham Jones aged 60 – Committed January 27th, by the Rev. Mr. Cartwright; charged with stealing a large iron bar, the property of Messrs. Hawkes, Wainwright, and Hassall. T:B:

11.       Benjamin Foster aged 48 – and

12.       Edward Careless aged 41 - Committed January 29th, by the Rev. Mr. Haden; B. Foster charged with stealing half a dozen padlocks and keys, the property of Joseph Tarratt, and E.Careless with receiving the said padlocks and keys, knowing them to have been stolen. T:B:

[Page 3]

13.       Francis Latham aged 17 – Committed January 29th, by the Rev. Mr. Haden; F.Latham charged with stealing a quantity of flour and three loaves of bread, the property of Samuel Peard, [‘and S.Baker with receiving part of the said flour, knowing it to have been stolen’ crossed out] T:B:

14.       Sarah Baker aged 29 – [above]

15.       John Tonks aged 30 – and

16.       William Pritchard aged 41 - Committed February 13th by the Rev. Mr. Waltham; charged with stealing one ewe sheep, the property of Henry Holford, and Joseph Halford. T:B:

17.       Esther Pritchard aged 49 – Committed February 13th, by the Rev. Mr. Waltham; for want of sureties for her appearance to give evidence against John Tonks, for sheep stealing. T:B:

18.       Joseph Badderley aged 21 – Committed February 16th, by William Miller Esq. Mayor of Newcastle; charged with stealing one cock fowl, the property of Joseph Lees. [‘two cocks’ crossed out] T:B:

19.       James Pitt aged 24 – Committed March 5th, by the Rev. Mr. Haden; charged with burglariously breaking into the dwelling house of William Pickerill, and stealing therefrom a new pair of shoe, a chawl of bacon, and about three pounds weight of cheese, the property of the said W. Pickerill. T:B:

20.       Japheth Cotton aged 30 – Committed March 8th, by the Rev. Mr. Haden; charged with not having surrendered himself  to be examined before the Commissioners named and authorized in a commission of Bankrupt, issued against him.

[handwritten below] No Bill 21.Charlotte Groves, Mary Groves – for stealing 3pd of stockings the property of Smith.

T:B: 22 James Pascoe – Assault William Mason, Wolverhampton.

Morgan Press, Stafford

No.9 Prosecutor had sworn positively before the Magistrate to the identity of the Prisoner, Before the Grand Jury, would not swear positively, but said he believed the prisoner to be the man.

Judge seemed to find the Bill.

Penelope Edwards, Edward Foley – Sold Prisoner and ounce or two, cannot tell which, of white Arsonick.

Adams Hubert of the [defendant, deceased?] Prisoner acted as a Servant, [and Governess?] a year. Potatoes found [harper?] All sick, Penelope sick also.

The Bill against Penelope Edwards having been returned to the Judge at his lodgings who was then alone and the [complaint?] requiring two persons would to be found,Mr [Bacon Sutton after the [heat?] had  - - and the case of this informality and that on consulting with M J. Larimer[?] the [Menl?] put beg &c novo but that he would send over the Evidence to the Witnesses as he had taken it for their conformation with L-ts for the Counsel for the Prisoner to ask any questions.

Sir George Littleton Bart.

Sir James Wootherly Bart

Geroge Chetwyn

Edward Blount

George Blount

Dyatt

 Clifford

John Lane

Edward Groves

Phineas Huttes [Hussey?]

Mr Bainbridge

Moreton Walhouse

James Eld

Watler Wh

Const D Eves

George Moliner

 

 

April 1806.  Books at Linley Wood

Catalogue of James Caldwell's books at Linley Wood.  Noted as April 1806 in James Caldwell's diary (William Salt Library).
Including those bought from the library of the late Mr Bentley [Thomas Bentley]
DICTIONARIES & GRAMMARS
Johnson's Dictionary 2 volumes Qto. 1785
Ainsworth's Latin Dictionary 2 volumes Qto. 1783
Vocabolario Degli Academici Della Crusca 3 volumes Fo. 1691
Chamband's Dictionaire Francais Anglais Qto. 1778
Steven's Spanish & English Dictionary Qto. 1726
Scapulae Lixicon Fo.
Schruellus Lexicon Qto.
Le Grand Dictionalre de L'Academie Francolse Fo. 1695
Priestley's Theory of Languages Do. 1762
Rags Collection of English Words Do.
Wailly Principes de la langue francolse Do. 1777
Regissard Nouvelle Methode pour apprendre
De les langues francolse & Angloise Do. 1736
Priestleys English Grammar 1768
INTRODUCTIONS, GENERAL LEARNING & CRITICISM
Shaws Bacon 3b 4to. 1733
Bacons Adanamt of learning Fo. 1674
Descartes Dinoners de la Methode    ------ ? 12o. 1724
Gassinde, Philosophie par Bernier 12o. 1684
Lami. Elemens des Sciences 12o. 1706
Bielfields Emdition complete 12o. 1768
Nouvelle Encyclopedie portative 26 12o. 1766
Bibliotheque Choisie 27 Tomes 12o. 1712
Bibliotheque ancienne 20 12o.
Monthly Review from 1749 to 1806 (two volumes wanting, 50 & 51) (Gentlemans Magazine from 1 764 to 1770
EDUCATION, SPEAKING, READING & WRITING
Quintilien, de l'Insitution de l'Oraleur par Gedoyn  4to. 1718
Locke on Education
Priestley on Education
Barron on Education
Edgeworth on Education
Rousseau Comile

 

12-2263 © WEDGWOOD MUSEUM TRUST 2004.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
1 May 1806
Bill of Sale for some Wood & Caldwell table ware to Wedgwood & Byerley.  £0:7:0

 

 

16 September 1806.  James Caldwell and William Bent thanking those who helped during a fire.  Broadsheet published after a severe fire at the Brewery.

Mr Bent and Mr Caldwell are desirous to lose not a moment in returning their most hearty thanks to the Volunteers, to their friends and neighbours, and to the inhabitants of the town of Newcastle, and the Potteries in general, for their kind and ready assistance, as well as great and effacious exertions on the calamitous accident with happened last night; and of which Mr Bent and Mr Caldwell beg to assure them that they shall ever retain grateful remembrance.  Brewery, Tuesday Morning, September 16th, 1806.

 

 

30 September 1806.  Vote of thanks to James Caldwell.

30 Sept 1806

Vote of thanks transmitted by Mr MillerEsq, Mayor.

Borough of Newcastle under Lyme

Assembled in the Guild Hall of the said Borough all or a major part of the Common Council present the 30th day of September 1806 according to the liberties and privileges of the said Borough

It was Unanimously Resolved

1st. That James Caldwell Esq., the Recorder of this Borough be requested to accept the most cordial expressions of the grateful sense which this Court entertains, not only of the unremitting zeal and ability displayed by him in the punctual discharge of the Duties of that Office, and in his constant and ready attention to the public prosperity of this Corporation and Borough, but of his uniformly polite conduct and urbanity, to the individual members of this Court.

2nd. That the thanks of this Corporation, in particularly, be offered to the Recorder, for his distinguished Exertions, which have proved so honourable to himself and to the Borough, upon the late occasion of the visit of their Royal Highnesses the Prince of Wales and Duke of Clarence.

3rd. That the Mayor be requested to sign and transmit to the Recorder a copy of the foregoing Resolutions.

Miller.

 

 

4 October 1806.  Copy of a letter sent by James Caldwell to ?

Linley Wood, 4th October 1806

Dear Sir,

I received last night the favour of your letter inclosing a copy of the Resolutions of the Common Council of Newcastle assembled in their Guild hall on the 30th September; and can only lament my inability to express in any adequate terms how deeply and sensibly I feel this additional [ashchequers?] and most flattering mark of their partiality and attention. Regarding as I ever have done, and as I ever shall, the Office which I have the happiness to fill of their Recorder, as the prime, no less than the most dearly valued honour of my life, I cannot but be proportionately gratified by the hope which it is thus allowed me to indulge of having been able on any occasion to discharge the duties of it in a manner satisfactory to them, to whom I am not only attached by every sentiment of [public?] consideration and respect, but by the warmest sense of gratitude for the amiable and unceasing proofs that I receive of  individual kindness and friendship. Permit me, sir to assure you, and through you the gentlemen to whom I am so highly indebted that I feel, as I ought to feel on this occasion, and that associating as I ever do the happiest recollections of my first life with my Communications with the Borough of Newcastle, it shall be my anxious and unremitting endeavour, though what remains of it, to prove myself not altogether unworthy of that good opinion and esteem which I value more than life itself, on which should I be happy enough to [prove?] it will do so much honour to my memory when in the grave.

Give me leave to return your friendly by but thanks for the [very but?] thanks for the very kind and friendly manner in which you have been pleased to communicate to me the resolves of the Canal Committee, and to assure of the serious respect at which it will [? – very scrawly draft writing]

Your obliged and faithful servant

James Caldwell

 

7 March 1807.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth. 

 

Mrs Caldwell

Linley Wood

Lawton

Cheshire.

(to be sent up immediately without fail)

Bedford Hotel

7th March 1807

My dear Eliza,

One line and no more. The Committee have decided in favour of the Sitting Members. The Petition not frivolous or vexatious. This, indeed, could not be expected as the whole was resolved into a point of Law. The point which I ventured to describe. I believe that the evidence I gave made a strong impression on the Committee; and I understand that Mr [Seytons?] (Mr Fletcher’s Counsel) spoke of my conduct in very complimentary terms in his summing up. Peake with whom I dined yesterday told me that Mr Porley on his return from Newcastle without knowing that he and I were aquainted, spoke most highly and warmly of the manner in which the Election had been conducted by me. Will you believe that though a very long examination and cross examination, an hour and a half or two hours, before the Committee, not a nerve shook; but I was as recollected and as much master of myself as if I had been amongst the trees and sheep of Linley Wood. You may suppose, however, that these great efforts cost something but I have been resting myself all day today in my private room, where I have coolly [hole in letter, wax seal] –ted the event. I am afraid Mr F L- [hole] –‘s character no good. I understand that Mr Dallas one of our Counsel said that if the Agreement to close the [Pall?] should be proved against him he could never be considered as a Gentleman or a man of Honor. It was so proved clearly and undeniably. But of this say nothing. It is a pity he should have been in the hands of such bad advisors. I shall stay in town tow or three days longer. Tomorrow I propose calling at Lord Staffords. I am so [feared?] of losing the Post that I can only say I will write again tomorrow. God bless you my ever dear wife. Divide my tenderest love and affection among our dear children and be assured that if any circumstance seems to render me at all satisfied with myself, its highest gratification is derived form the idea of being more worthy of you, ever yours.

James Caldwell

 

 

Note presumably written by James Caldwell relating to some voting which took place 9 May 1807.

James Caldwell of Linley Wood in the County of Stafford Esquire saith that he is Recorder of the Borough of Newcastle under Lyme having been appointed to that office in the year 1802. That he has since attended on three Elections at the request of and for the purpose of rendering his entirely gratuitous assistance to the Returning Officers; and particularly at the late Election of 1807. That the Poll was taken by the Seat Roll; which this Witness has been informed and believe to have been the invariable custom in the Borough of Newcastle, with the exception only of the Election of 1792. That the Roll is called over three times, and the name of every person who does not appear; called thrice each time. That the last Election commenced on Wednesday the 6th May 1807, and concluded on the Saturday following [the 9th] at about half after four o’clock in the afternoon. That 622 Burgesses appeared and voted, being 67 more than polled in 1802, and as this Witness has been informed and believe 53 more than ever polled at any former Election. That the Election proceeded in an orderly manner and without any interruption or disturbance from either party, beyond what commonly and perhaps unavoidably and excusably arises on such occasions. That on the morning of Saturday the 4th day, as soon as the [Cavit?] was met, all the parties joined in a request to the Returning Officers, that they would if necessary sit more than the customary hours, it being their unanimous wish that the Poll might at all events close that day. That this was immediately agreed to by the Returning Officers and this Witness. That the Election then proceeded and the contest was for several hours extremely close and severe between Mr Macdonald and Mr Fletcher; but at length Mr Fletcher said, that he did not wish to give Mr Macdonald any unnecessary trouble, and should therefore decline, or expressed himself to that effect. That all the candidates then shook hands, and the Witness supposed the business was over. That Mr Macdonald was only a few votes ahead. That at this time there were three votes which in the course of the Poll had been tendered for Bootle and Macdonald but which being objected to by the Counsel on the other side remained undecided; it having been agreed that they should stand over to the last on account of some evidence which was expected to arrive. That Mr Bootle requested that these votes might now be investigated and decided upon; but which [according to this Witness’s recollection] was objected to by Sir Thomas Fletcher, the father of the Candidate, and as this Witness thinks by Mr Fletcher himself: but the conversation having taken place across the table, this Witness cannot state the Particulars of it. That Mr Bootle continuing to urge the point, and stating it to be the earnest wish of the voters, or of one of them at least, to have the question of the legality of their votes decided upon, this Witness thought it to be the duty of the Returning Offices to comply;  particularly, as the votes had been previously tendered and only stood over by consent. That the cases were accordingly argued, and two of the votes proving good were put upon the Poll. That the other was rejected. That a vote which had been tendered for Mr Fletcher and Mr Minett was then argued and Counsel heard; but this was also rejected. That during the discussions [outcry?] was raised in the Hall of fresh Voters X [‘That one John Glen then ordered his vote, to the validity of which no objection being made, he was immediately admitted to Poll, and which he did for Mr Boottle and Mr Fletcher’ crossed out] That several other persons afterwards tendered their votes, all of which according to the best of this Witness’s recollection were rejected except two. That a cry was also raised, and which in this state of the Poll excited much agitation, that a voter in the interest of Fletcher and Minett was detained by force in the House of a Mr Hill, and prevented from coming to vote. That the Returning Officers and this Witness immediately expressed their indignation at any such attempt; and the Mayor offered to go in person and bring up the voter. That it was then agreed that the two Fletchers, attended by the High Constable, and one person of each party, should be dispatched for the voter; who shortly after appeared on the hustings. That in the meantime it had been settled, that nobody should speak to the voter but the Witness, who immediately informed him, that that was the time for him to vote, and which he was at perfect liberty to do in what manner he thought best: when the voter said he would rather not vote at all, or expressed himself to that effect, and after repeating this once or twice, in reply to questions distinctly put to him by this Witness, he quitted the Hustings without voting. That this was the only complaint of the kind that this Witness heard of throughout the Election. That it being now not even pretended by either side that there was a single other voter in the town who had not voted [except one who was dangerously ill in bed, but whom, as it was known that he would Poll for Mr Macdonald called upon the Returning Officers to close the Poll and make their Return: but to which Mr Fletcher and Mr Minett strongly objected, alleging, that they had received a letter [and which this Witness thinks one of them held in his hand] with an account of other voters being upon the road who would be ready to vote on Monday; and therefore called upon the Returning Officers to adjourn the Poll till that day, the next being Sunday. That this Witness also recollects Mr Fletcher saying, that he had two or three voters to be made free, and that he required a hall to be held for that purpose; but this Witness heard no name mentioned, nor were any votes tendered. That this Witness understood that several halls had been held in the course of the Election, and particularly one on that very morning for the purpose of making Burgesses, and that no hall could be held without an adjournment to Monday, the custom of the Borough requiring as this Witness has always understood, that Notice of a Hall should be given the night preceeding. That much debate arose, the Candidates on the one side strenuously insisting on, and those on the other as strongly protesting against, the closing of the Poll. That under these circumstances the Returning Officers referred themselves to this Witness; when, after looking into the Acts of Parliament and Books relative to the proceedings at Elections, then in Court, and maturely and with great anxiety weighing the question in his mind, and more particularly taking into consideration, that all the requisite and accustomed forms had been punctually and carefully gone through, that it was not even contended that there was another voter in the town, [‘or stated to be at any other specified place, or within any specified distance’ crossed out] ready and desirous to vote. That there was no evidence even of voters being any where upon the road, further than what arose from a mere letter said to have been received. That it is the duty of Returning Officers to finish the Poll with all dispatch consistent with the rights of parties, and the allowance of a reasonable time for the Electors to come and vote. That ample opportunity for this had already been afforded, the Poll having then continued open four entire days. That it is not encumbent upon, nor the duty of Courts of Justice to procrastinate or delay their proceedings from any consideration arising from the negligence or remissiveness of parties and that in point of fact a much greater number of voters had then actually polled than had ever polled at any former Election. On these and such like points this Witness was of opinion that the Poll was legally and duly finished, and that the Return ought to be made. That this Witness was the more confirmed in his opinion, from the circumstances of the learned Counsel for Mr Minett, who had taken no part in the argument, declining to give any opinion on the point, though, from greater caution, particularly requested by this Witness so to do, as Amicus Cuvua and from whence this Witness concluded that he concurred in opinion with himself as to the proceeding, and which he had the satisfaction afterwards to find from that gentleman was the case. That the Mayor then more than once cried out aloud, that they would still wait till the seven hours were expired, at the end of which, if no voter came in, they would close the Poll. That the Witness cannot speak with certainty as to the length of [‘the interval’ crossed out] time but thinks [‘it must have been an hour or something more’ crossed out] from the time of the last vote having been given. That on the expiration of the time and after the usual Proclamations by the Town Cryer, the Poll was closed and the Return made: and from the mention which the candidates were pleased to make in their Addresses to the Electors, of the honorable manner which the Poll had through out been conducted, this Witness went away under the fullest impression and conviction that all parties were satisfied in respect to the business and regularity of the Proceedings and the Justice and Legality of the Determination. 

X – one John Glen then tendered his vote. That Mr Macdonald –y to any fresh voters being permitted to poll, on the – of the Poll having been already closed by consent and that the votes which it had been determined to investigate had been tendered previous to that circumstance, but there being no objection to the validity of Glen’s vote this Witness was of opinion that the proclamation had not been made and as the Court was then sitting he ought to be admitted to Poll, and which he did for Bootle and Fletcher

More notes handwritten in pencil around the edges but very difficult to read.

-          think Mr F had the letter or paper in his hand. Mr Minett afterwards and at this perhaps just after the Mayor had declared that – 7 hours.

 

 

17 January 1808.  Letter to from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

Mrs Caldwell

Miss Caldwell
Nantwich

Linley Wood

Monday one o’clock

17th January 1808.

My ever dear Eliza,

It is a great mortification and disappointment to me not to be able to come to Nantwich today, but being obliged, from the extreme roughness and slipperiness of the roads, to walk a good deal yesterday, and having been detained longer at Newcastle than I expected, I felt so much fatigued that I thought it better to take my breakfast in bed this morning particularly as I have engaged to set off with Mr Bent to Liverpool on Wednesday morning, and you know, I must be at Newcastle the greatest part of the day tomorrow. Having been writing now since I got up, the time has insinnably[?] slipped away, and on looking at my watch, I find that it will now be impossible for me to get it answered in time for Mr Jos Garnett’s dinner, of which I should on every account have been most particularly happy to have partaken; and of this be so good as to assure him from me. I find all our dear girls well and rendered happy beyond expression, as you may well suppose, by the account I brought of their tenderly beloved Aunt. Mary seems better in every way, and in good spirits. The servants seem all to have behaved extremely well, and to have shewn the utmost attention. The four male servants waited regularly every day at table; which I suppose must have been rather amusing to all the party, and particularly I believe to Mr Charles. I thought it best to open the inclosed letter from Mrs Crompton, not knowing whether it might not contain some intelligence that it might be proper for me to be acquainted with. If your sister and Eliza do not bring the most favourable account of your very dear Patient, I will at all events come to Nantwich this evening. Express to her from me every thing that is most tender, sympathizing, and affectionate; not forgetting too our dear Bessy who if possible possesses a higher place than ever in my affection and esteem. And, would to God, my more than ever loved and valued wife, that I could find terms in which I could convey to you but a faint idea of the tender fervent, and grateful affection with which my heart at this moment throbs at the thought of you. Every fresh occasion, seems only to afford a fresh opportunity for evincing that high and solid [merrit?] which while it commands my admiration, my respect and my esteem, nourishes the warmest flame of love and pleasure, and will ever preserve it, in unabating ardour. I hope and trust that our dear Ann’s recovery will proceed so as to admit of you meeting me at Linley Wood on Sunday evening, which will be as early as I shall be able to get back; as we propose stopping at Macclesfield on our return, and getting that business done. I hope that our dear boy will be of the party, and that it will to us all afford the best and purest joy on earth, unmixed domestic love and happiness. Be so good as to say everything that is kind from me to Mr Atkinson, and assure him that it is a most real disappointment to me not to be able to see him; but the circumstances under which I am placed will I trust sufficiently account for it. The chaise is just arrived, and the account it brings has indeed made me more completely happy. You must not blame your daughter for disobedience of [boredom?] about the birds. I have insisted on the Snipes going, which I hope you and Bessy will agree about the division of, and to make all things straight, we have kept the Partridges at Linley Wood. God bless you! My dear wife. Take care of yourself; for on you more than on all the world besides depends the earthly happiness of your ever most tenderly affectionate and grateful husband and friends.

James Caldwell 

 

 

4 March 1808.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.  Written from London.

Mrs Caldwell

Linley Wood

Lawton

Cheshire

Bedford Coffee House

Friday 4th March 1808

My ever dear Eliza,

On my return home from the House of Commons I have this morning received your letter which could never have come at a better season, as this is the third day that I have been dancing attendance in the Lobby from ten o’clock in the morning till three in the afternoon. I was amused at finding written in pencil on one of the Pillars “Another Misery of Human Life – Obliged to dance attendance in this Lobby for ten days waiting upon an Election Committee.” Mr Fletcher’s Counsel finished their Case today, and I trust that tomorrow I shall get unburthened of a lot I have to say. The whole question is reduced to the single point of the Opinion which I gave to the Returning Officers to close the Poll; so that you see I must stand the [Rub?] to the Cash. I would not have anything said about it, but it will be I know a great satisfaction to you to know that I have reason and hope that there is no doubt of the result. Indeed every lawyer I believe agrees that I was right. My decision was important, as it will set a precedent in future in all Elections. But to have done with this hateful subject. It will be a much greater satisfaction to you my beloved wife, to know that although not perfectly stout[?], I feel nothing materially amiss and that I am upon the whole considerably better than when I left home. It is merely to say this that I write a line by this night’s Post for as to any attempt to caress the emotions of tender and grateful affection all which your kind, soothing and animating expressions fill my heart, that would be now impossible. I will endeavour to believe that your union with me has been a source of the happiness which you describe, for of all reflections that will ever be to me the dearest and most delightful. I have seen nobody since I came to Town. I had an invitation to dine at Mr Macdonalds at [hole in letter due to wax seal] and at Mr Boothes today, both of which I declined, preferring the quiet even of a solitary room in an Coffee house to going into any company till our business is finished. Dr Crompton left London before I arrived. I think the decision a hard one upon the individual; but very well as a check upon the needless protraction of contested elections; by withholding voters unnecessarily and only to open at time[?] Pray let me know in your next whether be any little thing that will be acceptable to you or any my very dear girls. I forget to mention this to you before I left home I know to what to turn my thoughts? Pray give me a hint. I have not yet called upon Stodhart, and leave you with which I trust will be by the first opportunity said on the direction of Mr Cooper. I am pretty sure I met Mr Gaskell twice in the Lobby but as he did not seem to recognize me, I took no notice. I can say nothing at present of any Returns; but trust it cannot now be long. Lord Stafford’s Gallery will be opened purposely on account of his [Staffordin?]. Remember me in the tenderest manner to my dear Stamford and his dear sisters and ever think of me as your tenderly affectionate and grateful husband.

James Caldwell

 

 

9 March 1808.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth, written from London

Mrs Caldwell

Linley Wood

Lawton

Cheshire

Bedford Hotel

9th March 1808

Though our main business is over, my beloved Eliza, yet I have had such a number of things relating to the Navigation &c to attend to today, that I have almost suffered the time for the Post to elapse before I could sit down to write but if it be only a line it will be sufficient just to let you know that I am much better than when I wrote last and trust that I shall once more enjoy the heartful and blessing and delight of rejoining my tenderly beloved family on Sunday night. This however will in some degree depend upon a letter which I expected to receive today and conclude that I shall certainly receive tomorrow from Mr Sparrow of [Brighton?] The morning of yesterday was spent in viewing the north Gallery of Pictures at Lord Staffords. Both Lord and Lady Stafford received us themselves, nor could anything be more kind and obliging than their manner. Lady Stafford made repeated enquiries about you and all at Linley Wood and was indeed extremely obliging. She took me into her private room where I had the pleasure to sit with her some time. Of the pictures it is impossible to speak in any adequate terms and my observations must be reserved till we meet. Tell your daughters that I have this morning settled with Mr [Hodhart, Stodhart?] about a Pianoforte which he had himself selected and which appears to me to be of very superior tone and excellence. Mr Wedgwood having also called this morning I mentioned the subject and he very obligingly said that he would get a Lady of his acquaintance, a very finished performer to call and try the touch. I have also called at Mrs Newhams and Mr Salmon’s. The former I found complaining but to appearance full as well as could be expected. The latter said he had written to Mr [Yates?] and that the business will be fully made out [hole in letter] at Lady Day. And so much for business. Thank you my ever dear Eliza for the letter which I received this morning and which like every one that I receive from you operated like a [cordial?] to my heart. Distrust not the power you [‘have’ crossed out] possess to keep alive in breast the warmest and the steadiest flame of that of the tenderest passion, confirmed by the best exercise of judgment, and more than twenty years to dear and happy recollections can confirm. You are indeed, Eliza, the friend and partner of my very soul, now so intimately interwoven with every thing that renders life happy and desirable, that the thought even of existence without you is insupportable. But away with all the glooms. I trust we shall soon again meet not hastily to be parted. The Post Bell rings. Farewell. Distribute amongst our dear children all the tender love and affection that a father’s heart can feel, and ever think of me as your own most tenderly affectionate and grateful husband, J Caldwell.

 

 

 

 

 

29 July 1808.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.  Written from London.

Letter to Mrs Caldwell

Linley Wood

Lawton, Cheshire.

From Bedford Coffee House

29 July 1808

Knowing well, my beloved Eliza, how desirous you will be to received the earliest intelligence of me, I will not let the Post depart without letting you know that I now safely arrived at this place, where I have met with most comfortable accommodation as to rooms [les?] and certainly not the worse for my journey, though every step that we advanced seemed to increase the painful reluctance that I felt at being thus dragged as it were from every thing that renders life valuable or desirable to me. Most deeply and ardently do I hope that our separation will be of no long continuance. The Agents here seem to speak with great confidence of the event of our business; but such has been the extreme capriciousness of the determinations of the Committee of the House of Commons on Election Petitions this Session of Parliament, that no confidence ought to be indulged till all is over. I shall, however, be detained here a short time after the Election matters, Mr Sparrow of [Brighton, Bichton?] who I saw in our journey up, being desirous that a general meeting of the Noblemen and Gentlemen interested in our Navigation Questions, who are now in London, should be held whilst I am here in order that I might attend. This, you see, will be another arduous effort to go through. But no matter. Useful, honorable and active life has ever been my object, nor shall I now depart from my system. London is full of people. We slept at Coventry the first night, at [Brinet?] last night, and arrived here between and twelve this morning. I have an airy, quiet back sleeping room and a good sitting room up stairs to the Covent Garden which is lively and pleasant. Do not fear but that I will take every care of myself. Do the same and let me indulge the [luxuriant, happiest?] thought of finding you on my return well and in spirits. Indeed my beloved wife, we have abundant reasons to rejoice in the felicity which we enjoy; and I already feel the bitterness of self reproach from the recollection of the, I fear, too painful feelings that I have lately occasioned you. But on that kind indulgence in which I have so often found refuge, I must again rely, if I have been too hasty or too earnest. But you know well in what feelings and convictions all has originated. I shall depend of a reserving a line on Thursday morning. Remember me in the kindest manner to Stamford and all very dearly beloved girls and think of me as ever as your most tenderly affectionate and grateful husband.

James Caldwell

 

 

 

9 January 1809.  Letter to from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

Mrs Caldwell

Dr Cromptons

Eton House nr

Liverpool

Linley Wood, 9th January 1809

I know how it is, my beloved Eliza, but somehow or other, you always continue to “better expectation,” and avail yourself of every occasion that offers to strengthen your claims to my highest approbation and esteem, no less than my tenderest and most grateful affection. Most joyfully and thankfully did I receive your kind and early communication; which, from the account it brought me of yourself and your dear and interesting companion, relieved me from one anxiety at least, and seemed to dart like a ray of light and comfort across the gloom that has lately hung about me. It will, I know, make you happy to hear that I am today most materially better; and feel, almost like another Being, to what I have done for some time past. The pain in my side has in a great measure left me, indeed, I felt a sensible and almost immediate alteration, when the change in the weather took place, at what is become with us quite mild and temperate. I have been today at Burslem in consequence of a letter from Mr. Wood, and a question of considerable importance that has arisen namely the Rating of Coalmines and the Poor; and I propose setting off in the morning to Macclesfield, for which I assure you that I feel fully equal though the occasion is certainly not a pleasant one. However, I will try to probe things to the bottom, and then “let the galled Jade wince.” Mr Bent dined here yesterday. We had a very pleasant and [unresroed?] discussion of the subject of his purchasing Mr B’s share in the Newcastle Brewery, and which, though the parties are at present at arms length, will I think be finally effected. I am more and more convinced of the propriety of Mr Bents taking it, and of my having nothing to do with it. He spoke with great hope and confidence of the Liverpool Undertaking; and for myself, I need not say to you, that I scarcely know anything that will afford me more real joy and satisfaction than to find this speculation, on which you well know how much I have bestowed my best and most anxious consideration and attention, eventually was [wearing?] the views and expectations of our dear and valued friends at Eton. You may be assured, at least, that I will continue, as I have hitherto done, to contribute every effort in my power, towards its final and complete success. Little crossings and jostlings will in some shape or other, always attend important business, particularly amongst men of ardent mind and intent pursuit; but the best way, at least, as I have always found, and according to which, I believe that I have almost invariably acted, is to disregard trifles; sometimes not to see, and sometimes not to hear but never to permit ‘Mole Hills’ to become Mountains. These dear and interesting children are most assiduous in using every effort to fill the void occasioned by their mother’s absence; and by this sweet and unceasing attentions draw my best and wisest thoughts to the contemplation of that solid fabric in our domestic bliss and happiness, which whilst it is yielded to us, makes me almost blush to think that I can permit any other circumstance to disturb or weaken the enjoyment of. But you, my ever dear and valued wife, will never fail to make every indulgent allowance, for my too apprehensive imagination, and over harassed mind. But to have done with all this. I fear, that anxious and impatient as I shall be to hear from you again, this cannot be, till on my return from Macclesfield the earliest time of which will be Thursday. It would afford me extraordinary pleasure to join you at Eton; but on Saturday I must go to Hanley to inspect the arms of the volunteers &c. And by a letter which I have received from Mr Breck, there seems to be such a succession of meetings on the Tax, Militia &c as coupled with my Navigation engagements will not leave a sufficient interval for the purpose. As what I know will be most interesting and important to you, I repeat and truly assure you, that I am at this moment better than you will perhaps believe; and therefore intreat you that you will not think of me in any arrangement that you may judge it best to make either on our dear Mary’s account or otherwise, as to your stay at Eton. When I am writing to you, my pen, which certainly is not in general a ready one, runs so fast, that it often brings me to the end of my paper, before I have attend half the dictates of my heart. But what pen can write, or language express what I feel towards you? No, my Eliza, this can be known only by the sympathy of our own minds. All here are well and join in every kind and affectionate remembrance. Remembrance to the family. Farewell my dear loved and valued Eliza and think of me as I ever have been and whilst life continues I ever shall be your most tenderly affectionate and grateful husband, James Caldwell.

 

 

 

6 February 1809.  Letter from James Stamford Caldwell to his sister Anne Caldwell (later Mrs Marsh Caldwell).  James was 21 and Anne was 18.  Letter addressed to Miss Anne Caldwell, Linley Wood, near Newcastle, Staffordshire.  Postmarked 7 Feb 1809.  Noted as answered.  The handwriting is crossed making it difficult but it reads as follows:

Edinburgh February 6 1809
I date my letters. Do date yours, all of you, like good girls for it is very inconvenient to men of business.
My dear Anne
Your letter received today made me most happy by telling me that the home fireside was so comfortable by the good spirits of dear Mary [his sister] and better health of my father.  I hope every future letter will strengthen  . . . [keep?] agreeable tidings.  I wish to know however to what you allude when you say, your words are not without meaning when you talk of apparent Affluence and real misery.  I must have no secrets.  You know the agreement when I left home.  If I ever find that anything unpleasant has occurred of which I am not made the partaker I cease to write in confidence supposing that you take me for a sunshine brother who can bear only to hear of gaiety.  Do you allude to our own domestic affairs.  I hope I have been aconomical here.  Haygaith said the other day he . . . [heaer?] you any young men care so much about money.  Do let me have all cleared up immediately for ambiguity I cannot bear.  As for visiting E [Edinburgh?] they certainly do not take up much of my time here.  I have dined out once and supped out thrice been to two Assemblies and the plays.  This is the whole of my enjoyments since I came to Edinburgh except breakfasting with Leslie however I have not lost time.  Gibbon, Blackstone, Robertson, Life of Sir William Jones, etc etc, besides French have kept me in full employ together with lectures.  . . . [Dugold Heavant?] recommencing tomorrow.  During part of his absence a Dr Brown gave some lectures in his place.  I went once but thought I could employ myself better at home so have staid away and read Law instead.  Two opposition Revelies to the Edinburgh are setting off in town.  One by Canning, Walter Scott & the other by Cumberland.  Many people here have given up the old . . . [Beaeier?] in consequence of the Brome's paper in the last Number on Spanish Affairs.  I got today at last one letter of introduction from Burrow to an Advocate a Mr Grahame Author of the Sabbath etc etc, but as it pleased my lucky stars, I believe he is in a very bad state of health consequently I fear sees no company.  Am not I thoroughly unfortunate?  Burrow had sent me a packet before & some money enclosed to pay for some books for him prose.  This has been lost long ago!!  I really am glad that the Fletchers are made happy but having this . . . [sacae?] son.   I had hear the news however by the London papers 4 or 5 days before.  I can only wish that Boughey ever he  is a father may be more popular in his neighbourhood in order to pave the way for Sir Something Baughey.  I had very sincere pleasure in hearing of James Bent's safety.  I felt very anxious about a man with whom I had spent so many happy hours and whom I like so much.  If he is not a favourite with all of you now you don't deserve husbands that's all.  I wished to know but you will not answer my questions; who  . . . [every?] stewards at the last Assembly.  I found out that Powys was one from your letter but the lady I know nothing about also who are appointed for the next.  I also have asked two or three times about home affairs how Mr John's shapes etc etc.  That same word home has a magical influence even when I see it on paper.  What feelings I experience when I can write the letters that compare it.  When you are at a distance you will know what consequence one attaches to the minutest trifles which relate to the scenes of early youth.
Even the loud torrent and the whirlwind's roar.
But bind him to my native mountains more.
Those lines of Goldsmith [The Traveller] applied to the . . . are peculiarly happy.  Even the rudest features of the . . . of home form most powerful bonds of Attachment.  Now delighted I shall feel when I get once more a little into female society.  You know how fond I am of it, however I must always feel peculiarly obliged to the . . . [Tytlers?] for their frank easy good humoured manner towards me.  The other morning when I called I had the good fortune to find Miss Isabella (my prime favourite) along in the drawing room.  We had a tete a tete for some time.  At last her younger sister a very nice girl came in.  I enjoyed myself amazingly and staid I believe longer than I ought to have done.  The Glee ringing which I have heard by these three girls and Col . . . [Tytler's?] daughters, was delightful.  The family of Lord . . . [Woodhousele?] are very domestic.  Miss Isabella told me that generally only one went out to the parties by twins and that the two other sisters go up to help her to dress to console her for the loss of a home fireside.  After all nothing like domestic happiness, hard labour till 5 or 6 oclock, dinner and a family fireside.  I hope mine will not always be a solitary evening fireside.  Time will show whether plenty of serious consideration upon what a man ought to be in the married state will make a good husband.  But this is perhaps nonsense.  I know to whom I write or I should leave out the perhaps.  I assure you I shall hardly know how to look or speak in company soon.  I am afraid I shall soon be as tongue tied and modest blushing a young Gentlemen as I was 8 years ago.  My stupid bowel complaint has I hope left me, but the night before last it gave me a considerable . . . [dyece?] of pain.  Today however I am perfectly well and hope it was a parting . . .   But I believe I should make a very bad . . . [Russian?].  Cold I can well stand.  I rather think this has been, if not the foundation of my illness, at least an impediment to my cure.  The expense I care for most.  I went to the Courts to hear Jeffery speak the other day.  His figure is small but his eye and expression are certainly those of a chair man.  He kept it up the preceding day for four hours.  This day only an hour and half.  The judge before he began said "now do have mercy upon us Mr Jeffery we shall lose the use of our limbs" (I suppose the Man of Law meant by sitting so long).  I am going a . . . into Spain tonight with Mr Townsend and have also yet to read Blackstone.  I can spare no more time for scribbley nonsense & I cannot help sending you the following sentence from a letter of Sir William Jones which exactly accords with my designs "The most anxious wish of my heart is after having run my career with . . . to . . . in advanced age life to the beloved retreat of (Linley Wood) not with a . . . to indulge myself in indolence  which my disposition  abhors, but to . . . a dignified leisure in the uninterrupted . . . of letters".  May this be my lot!
Dear love to all the dear circle, my Father, Mother, Aunt & Sisters and believe me to be, dear Anne ever most affectionately your brother
J Stamford Caldwell.
I hope you will be able to read this. 

 

 

3 October 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth re his daughter Anne and Caroline Wedgwood being in a thrown out of a gig when returning from Hanley Church. Anne got a broken arm and possibly a rib. Caroline Wedgwood had more serious injuries.

Mrs Caldwell
John Wedgwood Esq

Etruria

Staffordshire

Liverpool, Tuesday 3rd Oct[?], 1809

Mr Bent kindly spared me till five minutes before the arrival of the Post this morning the intelligence which you have with so much tenderness and kindness, my beloved Eliza, communicated. My first impulse, as you may easily imagine, was that of immediately joining you that I might take my full share in the painful and trying circumstances under which you are placed, but on taking a little time for recollection and finding that as it is now Noon, I could not possibly reach Etruria at any reasonable hour. I have determined, however great the effort, to remain here today, and set off as early as possible in the morning so that you may depend upon seeing me in the course of the day. Mr Bent makes his arrangements so to accompany me home and I know not that I have ever given you a stronger proof of that implicit confidence which I repose, than by this delay, as nothing but the full and long proved experience that you will never deceive me by too favourable representations on occasions like these could have kept me from you and home[?] The first shock of the intelligence was as you may well believe, [severe?] but in gratitude that things are not worse, I hope that I have composed myself as much as could be reasonably expected and that you will find me prepared for whatever painful feelings await me. Express to the sufferers about you my tenderest sympathy and deep concern for what has befallen them. Then on occasions in which it is in vain to endeavour to describe what one fails, nor would like it if [hole in letter] avail. How thankful ought we to be that our dear Mary was not even a witness of the accident. My sweet Ann does not surprise me by the satisfaction which she expresses at her [injuries?] she suffers [other?] than her sister. It is like herself and adding a tenfold interest to her misfortune. It is useless to write more. I hardly know indeed what I have written but I thought it best at all events to apprize you of my plans. For ourselves, my sweet, my kind and affectionate friend and wife, we can only indulge the gratifying thought that by the full and tender participation of affection we can alleviate in some manner at least [Calarenc?] misfortune. Distress in whatever forms prescribed [hord?] find one unfailing source of thankfulness to God, for having first united and long procured us to ourselves and to our beloved children. Say everything they that is most kind and sympathizing from me to Mr Wedgwood and believe me with a force of feeling that never can be expressed ever your most grateful and tenderly affectionate husband. James Caldwell

 

 

17 November 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

Mrs Caldwell

No. 44 Margaret Street

Cavendish Square

London

Linley Wood, 17th November 1809.

In the first place, my beloved Eliza, let me thank you for your kind and considerate remembrance in giving me such early and comfortable intelligence of your journey, about which I could not but feel a good deal of anxiety, though the weather was certainly as favourable as at this time of the year could be reasonably expected. I hope and trust everything will continue to go on well with you on this interesting expedition, and that I shall ere long receive a comfortable account of our dear girl, who with yourself, are the two [ideas?] here always uppermost in my mind. We are going on here very well and every one of our daughters seems on the alert to make me as little as possible sensible of your absence. They are indeed very good, and I think exactly what one ought and wish them. Just as we were going to dinner yesterday, the two Mrs Wedgwoods drove up to the door on their return from Liverpool, and seemed much to enjoy taking a part of our family dinner. Mr Paske has I understand a favourable opinion of poor Bessy’s case, and Mrs Jos. Wedgwood takes her there again, in about a fortnight. They were only at Liverpool one day and did not see the Ladies from Eton, but Mr Jos. Wedgwood dined there with the Doctor. In your next letter I hope you will be able to give me some account of Stamford, and that his situation promises the advantages which he hoped to desire from it. If there be any thing material perhaps he will write a line himself; though I can easily conceive that the whole of his time is fully taken up. If he proposes going into another Office on the expiration of his year with Mr Bradby, I think Mr Abbots the most eligible that he could have solicited. Anne continues to go on well, though she felt sensibly the severe cold of the frost. It has set in again here last night, but has not affected her so much. Indeed she is gaining ground every day as fast as can be reasonably hoped or expected, and will I trust be soon restored to perfect health and happiness. In spite of myself, I cannot help already beginning to anticipate the happy moment of our reunion, and to which I look, my beloved Eliza, with a tenderness and fondness, that I should in vain endeavour to express, but which you I trust will not be disposed to blame. Age, may mellow, indeed, but believe me, it can never chill the love and friendship to which I bear you. Remembrance of the past would close [wax seal hole] the fire and preserve it in unabating warmth, ours is no common attachment, and will know neither decline nor change. Pray take all possible care of yourselves and regard nothing but making your anxious and interesting situation as easy and light as possible. When you can want a recruit in your finances let me know, and do not let any consideration of this kind interfere with any advice or other step whatever that it may [offer, offend?] you even in imagination only a satisfaction to take. This I now charge you not on your obedience my beloved wife but as another proof of your confidence and affection. In consequence of your sister’s message I have spoke to Thomas and agreed with him again. He behaved very well and said that his wages did not allow him to save anything at all and keep himself so neat as he wished. I fixed eighteen pounds for the ensuing year, which I hope your sister will approve, and if he continues to give her satisfaction perhaps she will not object to the Guineas for the year following that. You will be glad to hear that I have let the Alsager Estate to Mr Jackson to my satisfaction. Mr Skerrett came with him the day you left and we soon settled the business. He takes both Michd farm and Cashmores, and will I dare say prove a comfortable tenant. You may mention this to Stamford. Thank you my dear wife, for you kind remembrance of us in the [Larks?]. What a valuable thing is real love in having the power to impart even to trifles the means of giving happiness. Farewell, the paper is done and as I cannot read, so I shall not attempt to write cross ways. All the dear girls unite with me in everything most kind and affectionate to yourself and beloved Mary and your sister, not forgetting Stamford. Pray write to me immediately, every and more than ever your own,

James Caldwell

 

 

25 November 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

25 Nov 1809

Letter to Mrs Caldwell

No.44 Margaret Street

Cavendish Square

London

I do not know, my beloved Eliza, that I ever felt more depressed than on reading your letter, which arrived only by the last nights Post though it appears to have been written on Wednesday. The still greater uncertainty in which it seemed to leave the case of our sweet girl, came like a heavy cloud across my mind, and darkened at once all those pleasing hopes, which I have of late so fondly cherished of her speedy and entire recovery. The gloom, however, was happily, in some measure dissipated, by the better account which her letter to Ann conveyed, but deeply anxious indeed shall I remain till I hear from you again, and learn more particularly the opinion of Dr Bayley; who I can only trust and hope, may on a second visit, see reason to retain the favourable one which he seems to have expressed. On these unhappy occasions, one thinks, and hopes, and at last believes, that every care and caution have been used, and yet how necessary is it to account nothing done, whilst any thing remains that can be done, and to sound the depths even of possibility itself? We may declaim against anxiety so much as we please, but how rarely in human affairs can it justly be accounted error. And how often does it not prove the source of safety? How thankful ought we in the present instance to be, that the opinions of Mr A and Dr B have been taken; if for no other reason at least, for the satisfaction of reflecting that nothing that the extremist caution could suggest has been neglected. I do, however, now feel satisfied that every aid that human skill can supply will be afforded; and we have only therefore humbly to hope and fervently to pray that its efforts may finally be successful. As to my own opinion, for which you ask, it is to adopt whatever plan Dr Bayley may advise, and place implicit confidence in him. It is an additional satisfaction to find that there is some coincidence in his opinion and Mr [Luranorus?]. I need not, I am sure repeat it to you to disregard all thought and consideration of expense in whatever form it may present itself, and in your stay in London, must I find be frustrated, I can only enjoin you to employ every means, not only of rendering it efficacious for the great end in [brew?], but as far as circumstances will admit, most comfortable and happy. This longer separation, I shall indeed myself most sensibly feel; but you and I, dear friend and partner of my heart, have not now the lesson to learn of losing all consideration of ourselves in the dearer interests of our beloved children. You would receive a letter this morning from Eliza which I much fear might excite some uncomfortable feelings. It would be affectation to deny that the subject to which it principally relates, not only surprised but [hole in letter] me so much indeed that two half written [wax rip in letter] [hole in letter] thrown into the fire; so little had I the f- [hole in letter] expressing myself to my own satisfaction. Present circumstances, however, seem to have put the matter beyond question, and therefore I will dismiss it without further observation, leaving to you however, entire discretion to do what you think best. Stamford little knows what moments he costs me, in subjecting me to the painful struggle [‘between’ crossed out] when judgment compels me to restrain the will to meet all his wishes. I tremble only lest he should deceive himself. But of this no more. This is a time, only beloved wife, when your mind should be soothed and comforted instead of being agitated; and I am half disposed at the moment to let this letter have the fate of those that should have preceded it. Be assured that we are going on here as well as you yourself could wish. It is impossible for me to do justice to the unremitting and minute attention which all these dear girls shew to whatever they think can in any way contribute to my ease and comfort; and I believe it would to them be the highest of all rewards to know how deeply and sensibly I feel all their sweet solicitudes, and how they gratify and delight my heart. Ann keeps going on well; but I have some little fear for the perfect straightness of her arm. It can be nothing however of the smallest consequence. Indeed as the swelling is not entirely subsided, it is impossible to judge with certainty. I must however conclude, and yet I seem to have said nothing, at least compared to what I seemed to have to say, when I began to write. Prey let me hear from you by the return of the Post from the receipt of one letter to the arrival of another time clings with me with a heavy and leaden pace. Farewell, accept in one word all that my heart can dictate, or yours can wish to receive. Give all our best and kindest love and remembrances to our dear dear girl, to your sister and Stamford, and ever, ever my beloved wife, regard me as your faithful and most tenderly affectionate husband. James Caldwell

 

 

3 December 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

Mrs Caldwell

No.44 Margaret Street

Cavendish Square

London

Linley Wood, 3rd December 1809

It was my full intention my beloved Eliza, to have written a few lines to you yesterday, but having only returned in the afternoon from Sandon, where I had been most laboriously employed the whole of the preceding day, as well as that morning, on the reference between Mr Hill and Mr Heathcote and Mr Wood (who is still here coming to dinner) I could not bring it in; and I was the less solicitous about it, as I found that Eliza was writing. Inclosed is a Bank Post Bill for ten pounds, and the sinister half of another for twenty. The other half I will send you by the first letter that goes from Linley Wood. When you want more let me know, and remember my former injunctions. You may well suppose, that we shall all wait with the greatest anxiety and impatience for your next letter, which will I trust bring us a good account of Mr Home’s second attempt. It is grievous that it shall be necessary to repeat the operation; but let us profit by the hope that is afforded us that our endeavours will ultimately be crowned with success, and the happy circumstance that the pain and suffering of our dear, dear girl was not greater. It would, indeed, be a heartfelt satisfaction to me to see you all, though but for a few minutes. Of my thoughts, I need not say, that you have full possession; and in my dreams you are indeed all before me. You will be glad to hear, that I have brought this Talk Reference to an end; Mr Harvey and I having executed our Award about six minutes before twelve o’clock Friday night; that being the last hour that was allowed us. Mr Harvey was most particular in his enquiries after, and expressions of kindness towards you all, and seems sincerely desirous for further communication with us. He had not a single unpleasant word through the whole discussion, though it certainly was one of the most perplexing harassing and arduous matters that I ever was engaged in. I am going to Stone on Tuesday, to attend a Select Committee meeting, and shall be detained there that, and the following day. Most unfortunately Mr Wedgwood has fixed Tuesday for coming to Linley Wood; so that I shall [ton?] so much of the company of our good and kind friends, but hope they will make it up by a protracted stay. Early in the next week I must go to Nantwich on the old business between Sir Rd [Richard?] Broughton, Mr Penlington and Mr Salmon; which, bad as the Talk business has been, will, I fear, so far as relates to me at least be only passing (to use a homely expression) from the frying pan into the fire. However, I must make the best of it; and when this matter is ended, I do seriously intend to close any Books; and look a little more to my own comfort, and a little less to the interests and concerns of other people. It will please you to know that on the Talk business I accomplished every thing to my entire wish and satisfaction; and believe that substantial justice has been done to all parties; but whether this is what will exactly satisfy them; I neither know, nor care so far as relates to myself. Every day’s experience proves to me the wise and good sense of the Fable of the Painter, who in endeavouring to please everybody, pleased nobody; and if it were left to [me] to infuse into the minds of men, what would most of [hole in letter] a hindrance to their interests, as well as happiness, it would be a few additional drops of common candour. A simple and unexpensive prescription, my beloved Eliza, but such as, if in worldly matters there be a Panacea, will be found to contain it. I will not ask you to write to me immediately because I know, that the pleasure of writing to and receiving each others letters is completely reciprocal. Tell my dearest Mary to accept my tenderest love and sympathy and that I hail the moment, when she will sing to me again with an interest that it has never yet possessed, the song that is often vibrating in my ears, and on every string on my heart “Cease thy Anguish, Smile Once More.” To see her indeed, wear again the smile of perfect health and happiness will be a bliss that however fondly I hope to experience, I should vainly endeavour to express. Of your dear good girls at Linley Wood, I cannot say too much. They gain on my affection any approbation, and esteem, as circumstances [could?] to develop their understanding and their hearts. How blest, how unspeakably blessed are we in our dear children. How vain and empty is every other earthly good compared to this? Farewell, dear and beloved mother of them, and may you long, long enjoy the fruits of these seeds of virtue and if happiness which you have sown in their hearts and which have hitherto so happily grown with their growth, and strengthened with their strength. Receive in one word, all that diverse the most tender and in friendship and esteem affection can distill. Our dear girls here join me in every fond and kind remembrance to all about you and believe me, that I truly am more and more, your own grateful and affectionate husband.

James Caldwell.

 

 

18 December 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.  Post mark 20th Dec 1809.

Mrs Caldwell

No. 44 Margaret Street

Cavendish Square

London

Linley Wood, 18 December 1809

On my return home, my beloved Eliza, from Nantwich yesterday, I found your letter of the 14th. The hope of meeting with me on my arrival, had cheered and animated my ride, which was otherwise uncomfortable enough, as I was on horseback and the roads are in the most miserable state. That I may lose no time in sending the money you mention, I have procured a Note for £60 from Mr Kennerly which you will receive inclosed, and be kind enough to apply as follows, £25 to Stamford being in full of his Quarters allowance.

22.10 to your Sister being Mr Skerretts Interest, and the remaining Balance of 12.10 you will take to your own occasion letting me know when you have learnt the amount of Mr Home’s demand, what more you will want, and which you may be assured shall not only be most cheerfully, but gratefully sent. And here, my beloved wife, would I willingly stop, nor fair you and my reply adanting[?] to that part of your letter which relates to Stamford’s advance and which he [implies, misplace?] his allowance, if I did not feel it to be my duty, not to conceal the surprise and regret which it has excited in my mind. After all that I have done and all that has so recently been settled on this subject of his Allowance, I must be excused if I say that I begin to feel something very like being trifled with or at least to apprehend that I never am to be at rest from the miserable harass of mind and spirits arising from being thus perpetually obliged to object to schemes and arrangements professing to have for their end the welfare and happiness of those I am most anxious to serve and to oblige, but the futility and increased [contempt, ?] of which it is impossible for me not to see, what indeed can I, or that could any man of common sense, foresight and discretion think of any plans which proceeds upon the idea of the whole of a years income being advanced and appropriated within 9 months or three fourth parts of the time? As to laying on a stock of wine, I really am at a loss what to understand by this, unless I am to infer, that the same expensive course is to be pursued in London which was followed at Cambridge, I may at once prepare myself to endure as well as fear, the total loss of all comfort and ease or quiet or mind. It signifies not, making us of words, as well I therefore agitate your mind or my own further than to say that £300 a year paid quarterly is all that my circumstances will admit of my allowing Stamford. That this too cannot be done without great inconvenience and privation on my part as well as some injustice to those who have equal claims with himself on my affections and my consideration and my kindness. That circumstanced as I am I know it to be a truly liberal and bountiful allowance and such as perhaps not many fathers would make, and if therefore it is not sufficient to enable him to live entirely in the way that he may wish, it is his first duty to contract his plan, and square it to his means. He will do me great wrong if he thinks that any thing that I have said proceeds from anger. My sensation at this moment, and indeed of a very different cast; it is grievous in any case to find one’s utmost efforts still fall short of their aim; but fortunately so when they have for their object the contentment of those whose happiness as well as welfare it has been one unremitting endeavour to promote. If you think proper to mention the subject to Stamford, I wish you to say only what you may yourself think right; without the smallest regard to what has fallen [hole in letter] me, further than what may be necessary (if he ig- [hole in letter] again be) to apprize him of his own real situation [hole in letter] mine. I have never yet deceived him by [hole in letter] fallacious hopes or expectations; and an only [hole in letter] he may not deceive himself by the indulgence of a [hole in letter]. The three girls dine today at Etruria and go from thence [hole in letter] Mrs Wedgwood to the Assembly: but I am myself un- [hole in letter] at home with our dear little [Lonis, Loris?]for my only companion. I shall wait with great anxiety and impatience for your next letter, from a kind of hope, that it may give us some intimation of the time of your return. Happy indeed will be the moment when I shall again fold you to my heart for never was one animated by a more sincere and tender affection. Ann and Bessy will come here some day in the middle or later end of the Christmas week, but the particular one is not yet fixed. Mr Skerrett is not very well and talks of going to London ere long to consult Dr Bailey. They all desire me to send their kindest remembrances when I wrote, which I told them I should do today. And here am I yet to the end of my paper, without one word to my dear dear Mary. She has not however been the less in my thoughts, to which she is indeed almost always present. Give my tenderest fondest love to her and tell her how delighted I shall be to escort her to the next Newcastle Ball: for which I hope she will be fully qualified both in health and spirits. What a Lady like appearance Emma would make on the road today! A carriage to herself with two servants? Farewell dear friend and partner of my heart, remember me in the kindest manner to your sister and Stamford and think of me ever as your most tenderly affectionate and grateful husband.
James Caldwell

 

 

20 December 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

Linley Wood, 20th Dec 1809

As we are sending away a parcel containing the Probates of the Wills &c which your Sister is in want of, I cannot let it go, without inclosing to you one line, if it be only in return for the kind and comfortable letter which I received from you last night. I do indeed begin now to indulge the best hopes for our beloved girl, though in a case so deeply interesting and where disappointment would be so bitter, I will not suffer them to become too sanguine. When I wrote to you last I was pinioned to the armchair with the same kind of rheumatic, or as Mr Skerrett seems to think, gouty rheumatic attack, with which I was affected two or three years ago. Putting out of consideration the pain, however, which to own the truth was pretty severe, I dare say that I shall in the end be much better for it; and though I do not think it quite prudent to go out of door today, yet I have no doubt but that I shall be able to do it tomorrow with perfect safety. I really consider this attack as having come most opportunely for deeply should I have been mortified to have had you meet anything like sickness on your return or, indeed my beloved Eliza any other cloud to dim the happiness which you reappearance will diffuse amongst us. It has besides afforded you girls and opportunity of trying their skill at amusing one; and at which I think they are just as good adepts as at other things. Louisa and I had it to ourselves the whole of Monday; but we got through incomparably well. I was so extremely well the two days that I passed at Nantwich that I could not help more than once suspecting it to be the insidious harbinger of some change. It is impossible, indeed, to be better than I am now, with the exception only of a little pain, and that is too trifling to notice. Indeed, I should not have mentioned my indisposition at all if it had not been that you may always feel satisfied when you are away, that I conceal nothing from you, but give you a full true and particular account of everything and especially of what relates to me, who has so much reason to value himself, from the dear and gratifying idea which he is allowed to indulge of being valuable to you. I need not say how anxiously I shall wait for your next letter. Tell May, that [Canteb?] is in excellent order and good humor, and if he could know all, would I am sure feel proud in contributing his services towards the restoration of her health. The girls seem to have enjoyed themselves much during their excursion and had a very pleasant assembly, which was fully attended, all the Newcastle people being there. I find that I am nominated Manager for the next with Mr Halsell, to my great delight as you will easily conceive! But as Mrs Powys has sent a very particular request that I would undertake it, I suppose it will not do to refuse particularly as things are circumstanced in respect of the Room. In the letter which I wrote on Monday, I hope you would not think that I expressed myself too strongly. It certainly, my beloved Eliza, is in every account highly requisite and right, with say, indispensable to the future comfort of all, that the point to which it relates should be clearly and finally understood; and the door for ever shut, against the irksomeness of solicitation on the one part, and the pain of nonaquiescence on the other. All that I could do, I have done, all that I am able to do,  I am willing to do, not only for his eventual welfare and success, but for his present comfort and engagements. The limit, however, which my own sense of rectitude and prudence prescribes, cannot, must not, ought not to be transgressed. It would be worse than folly, it would be injustice. Economy, by which I intend not only the accommodation of expense to means but the judicious and considerate application of means to really useful ends, can do much [much crossing out of words here], is the duty of all, as is in all, respectable; if for no other reason, at least for this, that it constitutes the vital principle of genuine [more crossings out] independence. Money, in any case, spent in non-essentials, is for the most part money thrown away; and I believe,non-essentials upon a fair investigation be found to amount to greatly more than may perhaps be imagined or allowed. Let me not however hazard the imputation of preaching or declaiming. I would rather wish to act like the skilful and judicious person whom you have had before your eye, and do in critical cases, can touch the morbid part with a concerned and gentle hand, but if [held he?] with that salutary firmness which may minister to it cure. I conclude from what you say, that the money which I sent on Monday added to what you will receive from Mr Salt will meet all your occasions, should not you stay in London be protracted, otherwise, I would have sent you more herewith. I believe Ann is writing to Mary, so she will convey to her all the kind and tender remembrances of herself and her sisters. Give my dearest love to her, and ever, my beloved and valued wife and friend, ever think of and regard me as your most tender and affectionate and grateful husband, James Caldwell.

P.S. You must on no account forget to bring something for all these dear girls. Should your cash fall short, I suppose credit may for this purpose supply its place.

 

 

 

25 December 1809.  Letter from James Caldwell to his wife Elizabeth.

Mrs Caldwell

Mr Lawrences

Digbeth

Birmingham

Linley Wood, 25th December 1809

Though it might possibly be unreasonable, my own dear Eliza, yet I could not help feeling a little disappointment at not receiving some intelligence from you by the last night post; but I console myself by concluding from it that your stay in London is not protracted, and that you are now on your road to Birmingham; where, as I well know that it will be a satisfaction to you to meet with a line from me, I will not suffer the Post to depart tonight without one, though it be only to tell you that I am perfectly recovered from my late attack, and that you maybe quite comfortable and at ease on my account during the time you stay. Need not attempt to express to you, with what extreme delight we all anticipate our approaching meeting. Most joyful, indeed, will it be, if it be crowned with the prospect of the recovery of our dear girl; and most happy the moment, when with such hopes and expectations, we once more draw all together round our own fireside. Eliza had a letter from Ann Lawrence a day or two ago, giving us reason to hope for the pleasure of seeing her tomorrow at Linley Wood, but speaking of only staying one day, this arrangement you will probably alter. Miss Wedgwood is also coming to dinner tomorrow, and will stay all night. This visit is for the purpose of a grave Law Consultation with me, upon some knotty or point or other, about which she says, she can get no satisfaction from any body else, and so as she expresses it “like the rest of the Country” she is coming to me. I do not know whether if things continue to go on as they have hitherto done, I may not in time obtain the honour of a kind of Whitworth Doctor like fame in Law, at least whilst they continue to take small [hus, issues?] and I take none we shall probably not want practice, and that serves to keep up a sort of reputation whatever may be its solidity. If you stay at Birmingham, as you propose, and which will as Mary dearest be very prudent and proper, you will, I hope, give me a line by the return of the Post, as we shall all be impatient to know on what day we may expect you. It is very fortunate that the weather continues so mild. We [hole due to wax seal] Church this morning, and are give [wax seal] roast beef dinner today. One at the farm, and one at the Hall, as I suppose our guests will call it. Your girls are all well, and I believe I may add all happy. Mrs Beardmore is to drink tea with them; so you see we endeavour to let people suffer as little as possible by your absence. But be not afraid, my beloved wife, nothing in this world can ever make up the worst of your absence. At best it is to me scarcely life without you. I should unwillingly think of our ever being again separated for so long a time. But let me not cloud the dear and happy hope of our so soon meeting, with the comfortless idea of future partings. All these dear good girls join me in every tender and kind remembrance of yourself and your two companions, and you will also present our kindest regards and remembrances to all our friends at Birmingham. Should you not particularly mention [affix?] something about their coming to Linley Wood? Farewell dear friend and partner of my heart, and ever regard me as your most tenderly affectionate attached and grateful husband.

James Caldwell

 

 

 

1810  James Caldwell now 50 years old

 

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