Portrait of Adm Sir Graham Moore.
Click for larger image.

 

 

Adm Sir Graham Moore

1764-1843

Portrait of Adm Sir Graham Moore.
Click for larger image.

Born: 1764 and died 1843
Son of: Dr John Moore (1730-1802) and Jean Moore (nee Simson, 1735-1820).
Brother of:
1. Jane Moore (1758-1843).
2. Lieut-General Sir John Moore (1761-1809).
3. James Carrick Moore (1762-1860) who married Harriet. Henderson (1779-1866).
4. Charles Moore (1770-1809).
5. Francis Moore (1767-1854) who married Lady Eglinton.
Graham married: Dora Eden (1789-1875), in 1812, daughter of Thomas Eden of Wimbledon, deputy auditor of Greenwich Hospital.  Dora was a neice of Lord Auckland.
Graham and Dora had issue:
1. Capt John Moore RN (1822-1866?).

 

Adm Sir Graham Moore: An Overview

We know about Graham from many sources including:
1. The book "Records of the Carrick Moore Family" by George Heath, 1912.
2. The book 'A Memoir of Admiral Sir Graham Moore' written in 1844 by Major General Robert Gardiner.
3. The book 'Frigate Commander' by Tom Wareham, 2004.

 

Admiral Sir Graham Moore, G.C.B., G.C.M.G. (1764-1843) entered the Navy in 1777 and was made Lieutenant in 1782. Promoted Commander in 1790 and Captain in 1794, he enjoyed a colourful and distinguished career during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars which included the seizure of four hugely valuable Spanish treasure ships in 1804, the safe escort of the Portuguese royal family (fleeing from the French) to Brazil in 1807-08, the Walcheren expedition of 1809 and finally command of George III's yacht Royal Sovereign in 1811. Made Rear-Admiral and C. in C. Baltic in 1812, he later served as C. in C. Mediterranean and also at Plymouth. Appointed K.C.B. in 1815 for his wartime services, he was upgraded to a G.C.B. in 1836 having previously been created G.C.M.G. in 1820. A Lord of the Admiralty from 1816-20, he received his last promotion as Admiral of the White in 1841.  He retired to Brook Farm near Cobham in Surrey.

Portrait of Adm Sir Graham Moore.
Click for larger image.

 

 

Admiral Sir Graham Moore
as a midshipman

Attributed to John Opie

Further information can be found in the book 'Frigate Commander' by Tom Wareham.  This book is based on the journal of Sir Graham Moore.

If any one would like to write a biography to go here I would be very pleased to hear from you.

Letter from Adm Sir Graham Moore to George Heath regarding his son Leopold Heath who had just finished his course at the Royal Naval College.

 

Letters written by Graham Moore

Letter from Adm Sir Graham Moore to George Heath regarding his son Leopold Heath who had just finished his course at the Royal Naval College.

Addressed to: Mr Serjeant Heath, 18 Gower Street, Bedford Square, London.
[no postmark as this letter was carried by a servant]

Brook Farm, 
Cobham,
Surrey
Oct 12th 1831

My Dear Sir,
I enclose a letter from Julia [Graham's neice] to which this, as my answer, I sent to you.  I conclude that your son has finished, or will have finished, his course of study at the College before Sir John Gore sails; in which case, as he will then be entitled to the advantages resulting to those who have passed through the College I think it a most desirable circumstance that he should go out with Sir John Gore.  The East India station is a very good one, particularly in peace and I believe as healthy as any other.  Captain Loring is a most respectable worthy man and it is very much to your son's credit that he has made a friend of him.  With regard to the objection Julia mentions of the Flag Ship being more in harbor than other Ships, Sir John Gore can lend your son to any of the Cruisers under his orders which obviates it entirely.  I used to send my young men out in this way in the Mediteranean to give them sea experience retaining them still on the Books of the Flag Ship.  Accept the offer by all means.  I will write at more leisure to Sir John Gore whom I know.  Your servant awaits so excuse this hurried scrawl.  Your's very sincerely,
Graham Moore.

 

Letter from Adm Sir Graham Moore to George Heath regarding his son Leopold Heath who had just finished his course at the Royal Naval College.

Addressed to: Mr Serjeant Heath, 18 Gower Street, Bedford Square, London
[postmark B 26OC26 1831]

Brook Farm,
Cobham,
Surrey
Oct 25th 1831

My Dear Sir,
I think it will give Mrs Heath and you pleasure to know part of the contents of Sir John Gore's answer to my recommendation of your son, "My old shipmate Loring spoke so highly of young Heath's character and abilities that, without any other knowledge of him I desired Captain Hart to apply for him to be discharged into the Melville, and, when Mr Sergeant Heath told me that he was a protégé and relative of your's, it gave me additional pleasure that I had it in my power to do so, and you may rely on it, to shew [show] my sincere regard for you, I will do all that may lay in my power for this youth.  We start upon an excellent foundation for when I left Mr Heath last Monday, it was to attend Sir Thomas Foley and Sir Michael Seymour on an enquiry at the College: the Boys of the first Class having struck work.  We found that young Heath was an exception pointed out by Dr Inman and Mr Mason the head and 2nd Masters, consequently, instead of being included in the List to lose one month's time, he received an encomium and he was placed at the head of the class".  I think, as I before stated in my letter to you in answer to Julia's, that your son begins his Naval career under most promising circumstances and it ought to be much more satisfactory to you than if he had been placed with Sir John Gore in consequence of family, or any other connexions [connections].  My wife joins in kind regards to you and Mrs Heath and I remain, my Dear Sir, very faithfully your's.
Graham Moore.

 

 

If you have any information to add to what is listed please contact me on jj@jjhc.info

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